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Majors and Minors in Health and Human Sciences

Majors List

Athletic Training | Family and Consumer Sciences (General) | Health and Exercise Science | Health and Physical Education | Nutrition and Wellness


Minors List

Coaching | Equine Studies | Family and Consumer Sciences | Nutrition and Wellness

Specializations List

Family and Consumer Sciences Education


Additional Information

Pre-Professional Programs and Articulation Agreements

General Education Requirements

Athletic Training Major

Consists of 56 credit hours in the following courses:

ES 249 Nutritional Concepts in Exercise Science
ES 250 Emergency Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries
ES 251 Basic Concepts in Athletic Training
ES 252 Clinical Affiliation I: Introduction to Athletic Training
ES 301 General Medical Conditions
ES 320 Kinesiology
ES 335 Physiology of Exercise
ES 351 Athletic Injury Evaluation
ES 352 Clinical Affiliation II: Lower Extremity
ES 353 Clinical Affiliation III: Upper Extremity
ES 354 Therapeutic Modalities
ES 355 Therapeutic Exercise and Rehabilitation
ES 356 Management Concepts in Health Care
ES 450 Advanced Clinical Evaluation Training
ES 451 Clinical Affiliation IV: Equipment Intensive
ES 452 Clinical Affiliation V: General Medical
ES 453 Counseling and Pharmacology
BIOL 112 Human Biology
BIOL 305 Introduction to Human Anatomy
BIOL 314 Human Physiology

For individuals looking to prepare for an allied health career in athletic training. In addition, the major provides an added avenue for students interested in pursuing graduate studies in physical therapy or occupational therapy.

Students are required to maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 and complete the application process to the department of health and human sciences (Jan. 15 is the deadline). Additionally, students must complete their clinical experience under the supervision of an approved clinical instructor and successfully complete the Clinical Competencies and Proficiencies and the five clinical affiliations.

Admissions Standards

Admission to the athletic training major is regardless of sex, race, color, national or ethnic origin or disability. Only applicants who have met the minimum requirements established below will be considered for a position. The admission process will be competitive for limited positions. Admission packets may be requested from the director of the athletic training program.

Understand and sign the Technical Standards Form for the athletic training program.

A complete application—submitted before January 15 of the application year.

Three letters of reference—stipulating academic and leadership potential and overall character of the applicant—from the faculty at Bridgewater College.

Completion of a minimum of 200 “pre-placement” hours with intercollegiate athletics at Bridgewater College. These hours are used to familiarize the student with the athletic training profession and the practical requirements of the program.

Successful academic performance resulting in a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5.

Successful completion of ES 250, ES 249 and BIOL 305 (final grade of C- or above).

Self-direction essay (500 words or more).

All students meeting established minimum requirements will be interviewed by the Curriculum Admission Committee.

The Curriculum Admission Committee will interview and rank candidates based on objective criteria. Admission will not exceed a ratio of more than eight students per licensed athletic trainer. Letters of admission will be sent to applicants prior to February 1.

Technical Standards Information

The Athletic Training Educational Program at Bridgewater College is a rigorous and intense program that places specific requirements and demands on the students enrolled in the program. An objective of this program is to prepare graduates to enter a variety of employment settings and to render care to a wide spectrum of individuals engaged in physical activity. The technical standards set forth by the Athletic Training Education Program establish the essential qualities considered necessary for students admitted to this program to achieve the knowledge, skills and competencies of an entry-level athletic trainer, as well as meet the expectations of the program’s accrediting agency (Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education [CAATE]). The following abilities and expectations must be met by all students admitted to the Athletic Training Education Program. In the event a student is unable to fulfill these technical standards, with or without reasonable accommodation, the student will not be admitted into the program.

Compliance with the program’s technical standards does not guarantee a student’s eligibility for the Board of Certification (BOC) exam.

Candidates for selection to the Athletic Training Educational Program must demonstrate:

  1. The mental capacity to assimilate, analyze, synthesize, integrate concepts and problem solve to formulate assessment and therapeutic judgments and to be able to distinguish deviations from the norm.
  2. Sufficient postural and neuromuscular control, sensory function and coordination to perform appropriate physical examinations using accepted techniques; and accurately, safely and efficiently use equipment and materials during the assessment and treatment of patients.
  3. The ability to communicate effectively and sensitively with patients and colleagues, including individuals from different cultural and social backgrounds; this includes, but is not limited to, the ability to establish rapport with patients and communicate judgments and treatment information effectively. Students must be able to understand and speak the English language at a level consistent with competent professional behavior.
  4. The ability to record the physical examination results and a treatment plan clearly and accurately.
  5. The capacity to maintain composure and continue to function well during periods of high stress.
  6. The perseverance, diligence and commitment to complete the athletic training education program as outlined and sequenced.
  7. Flexibility and the ability to adjust to changing situations and uncertainty in clinical situations.
  8. Affective skills and appropriate demeanor and rapport that relate to professional education and quality patient care.

Candidates for selection to the Athletic Training Educational Program will be required to verify they understand and meet these technical standards or that they believe that, with certain accommodations, they will meet the standards.

The Bridgewater College director of academic support services will evaluate a student who states he or she could meet the program’s technical standards with accommodation and confirm that the stated condition qualifies as a disability under applicable laws.

If the student states he or she can meet the technical standards with accommodation, then the College will determine whether it agrees that the student can meet the technical standards with reasonable accommodation; this includes a review of whether the accommodations requested would jeopardize clinician/patient safety, or the educational process of the student or the institution, including all coursework, clinical experiences and internships deemed essential to graduation.

Transfer Students

A student who has attended another accredited college or university and is in good standing may apply for admission to Bridgewater College. One who has attended an accredited two-year college may transfer as many as 68 credits in courses comparable to those offered at Bridgewater College. Transfer students applying for admission to Bridgewater College must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or above and be in good standing at the college they are attending. A transfer student applying for admission into the Bridgewater College Athletic Training Education Program must have a minimum of a 2.5 cumulative grade point average and must have completed the aforementioned admissions standards (Technical Standards Form, ES 249, ES 250, BIOL 305 observational hours, essay, application and interview). No student will be admitted into the program without successful completion of the pre-placement phase. Credentials collected for admission include all of those that are required for first-time entering students as well as a Dean’s Reference Form and an official transcript from each institution of higher learning attended since completion of the secondary program. Transcripts will be evaluated by the registrar on a course-by-course basis. Credit will be awarded only for those courses that a grade of C or above has been earned. The only course that may be transferred in within the athletic training major is ES 250. All other courses for this major must be taken at Bridgewater College. Other general education requirements may be transferred based on the above criteria.

Graduation Requirements

  1. Complete a minimum of 123 credits with a minimum of 48 credits chosen from junior-senior level courses.
  2. Complete general education requirements.
  3. Complete course requirements for the major.
  4. Earn a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.5 and a minimum grade point average of 2.5 in courses required for the major.
  5. Successful completion of the Clinical Competencies and Proficiencies.
  6. Successful completion of the five Clinical Affiliations (introduction to athletic training, upper extremity intensive sports, lower extremity intensive sports, equipment intensive sports and medical intensive rotation).

Following successful completion of this program, a student will be eligible to sit for the Board of Certification (BOC) exam.

Additional Requirements for Athletic Training

All students admitted to the professional phase of the program are required to attend pre-season training as early as August 1 each year.

Students admitted to the professional phase of the program may be required to complete their clinical affiliations during normal college breaks, e.g. spring break and holidays.

Additional fees for the program are announced in the athletic training student handbook and may include things such as the cost for class books, laboratories, clinical affiliations, criminal background check, medical examinations, CPR/AED/First Aid certification and clinical uniforms.

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Familiy and Consumer Sciences Major (General)

Consists of 32 credit hours in FCS courses including FCS 110 and 471 and at least one course in each of the five areas of family and consumer sciences: textiles/clothing; nutrition/foods; child development/family life; interior design/housing; and consumer studies/management.

Remaining required credits are to be selected in consultation with the student’s advisor based on career objective (e.g., PreK–6 certification, day care, community services, gerontology, fashion merchandising, housing and home interiors, family counseling, event planning).

Students not requiring FCS 400 for licensure purposes may substitute with PSY 370. Students may also select BUS 110 rather than FCS 425 for their consumer studies/management option.

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Familiy and Consumer Sciences Education (Specialization)

Designed for those seeking certification to teach in secondary schools with an endorsement in family and consumer sciences, grades 6–12. Consists of a minimum of 41 credit hours in family and consumer sciences including:

FCS 102 Introduction to Textiles, Fashion and Apparel
FCS 110 Foundations of Family and Consumer Sciences Professions
FCS 201 Principles of Food Science
FCS 321 Fundamentals of Housing
FCS 400 Child Growth and Development
FCS 412 FCS Curriculum and Instructional Methods
FCS 420 Occupation Program Management
FCS 430 Family Management
FCS 471 Senior Seminar

And one additional course in each of the five areas of family and consumer sciences: textiles/clothing; nutrition/foods; child development/family life; home interiors/housing; and consumer studies/management. (15 credit hours)

Students may substitute BUS 110 for FCS 425.

Separate admission to the Teacher Education Program (TEP) is a requirement for anyone wishing to graduate with a major in family and consumer sciences education. Specific admissions criteria for the TEP are found under the Education and Teacher Education Program (TEP) academics section. Consists of the following courses:

EDUC 140 Introduction to Foundations of American Education
EDUC 200 Psychology of Education and Development
EDUC 201 Field Experience I
EDUC 215 Diversity in the Classroom
EDUC 302 Field Experience II
EDUC 303 Field Experience III
EDUC 334 Reading in the Content Area
EDUC 370 Classroom Management
EDUC 380 Practicum in Current Teaching Techniques
EDUC 450 Seminar in Educational Philosophies
EDUC 470 Professional Student Teaching

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Health and Exercise Science Major

Consists of 52 credit hours in the following courses:

BIOL 112 Human Biology
BIOL 305 Introduction to Human Anatomy
BIOL 314 Human Physiology
ES 215 Research Methods
ES 230 Introduction to Health and Exercise Science
ES 249 Nutritional Concepts in Exercise Science
ES 300 Personal and Community Health
ES 320 Kinesiology
ES 335 Physiology of Exercise
ES 356 Management Concepts in Health Care
-or-
ES 360 Organization and Administration of Health and Exercise Science
ES 368 Psychological Principles in Physical Education and Sport
-or-
ES 367 Health and Exercise Psychology
ES 460 Senior Seminar

And 12 additional credit hours from the following courses:

BIOL 411 Advanced Human Anatomy
BUS 310 Principles of Marketing
CHEM 250 Fundamental Organic Chemistry
ES 260 First Aid and Safety
ES 325 Principles of Health and Physical Fitness Assessment
ES 342 Foundations of Strength and Conditioning
ES 345 Motor Behavior
ES 354 Therapeutic Modalities
ES 355 Therapeutic Exercise and Rehabilitation
ES 427 Health Promotion and Wellness
ES 491 Research
-or-
ES 499 Honors Project
MATH 200 Statistics
PHIL 320 Professional Ethics
-or-
PHIL 235 Bioethics
PSY 310 Abnormal Psychology
PSY 370 Developmental Psychology

This major introduces students to the sub-disciplines of health and exercise science, providing students with a sound preparation upon which to develop a career or to pursue graduate study in the discipline.

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Health and Physical Education Major

For the student pursuing a career in teaching health and/or physical education. Consists of 48 credit hours. Separate admission to the Teacher Education Program (TEP) is a requirement for anyone wishing to graduate with a major in health and physical education. Specific admissions criteria for the TEP are found under the Education and Teacher Education Program (TEP) academics section. Consists of the following courses:

ES 235 Introduction to Teaching Physical Education
ES 260 First Aid and Safety
ES 300 Personal and Community Health
ES 310 Movement Education
ES 318 Human Anatomy and Physiology
ES 335 Physiology of Exercise
ES 340 Health and Exercise Science Methods*
ES 345 Motor Behavior
ES 350 Tests and Measurements*
ES 360 Organization and Administration of Health and Exercise Science
ES 368 Psychological Principles in Physical Education and Sport
ES 370 Teaching Methods for Secondary Physical Education*
ES 385 Adapted Physical Education and Recreation
ES 426 Teaching Methods for Elementary Physical Education*
Three activity courses from ES 120–189
Minimum of 3 credit hours from ES 371–379

In addition to the major, the following courses are required for licensure/certification:

EDUC 140 Introduction to Foundations of American Education
EDUC 200 Psychology of Education and Development
EDUC 201 Field Experience I*
EDUC 215 Diversity in the Classroom*
EDUC 302 Field Experience II*
EDUC 303 Field Experience III*
EDUC 334 Reading in the Content Area*
EDUC 370 Classroom Management*
EDUC 380 Practicum in Current Teaching Techniques*
EDUC 450 Seminar in Educational Philosophies*
EDUC 470 Professional Student Teaching*

*Courses only offered to students accepted into the Teacher Education Program

Students wishing to pursue this major should declare their intentions early in their academic career due to the significant course loads required to graduate in four years and the need for careful planning and advising.

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Nutrition and Wellness Major

Consists of 49 credit hours in the following courses:

FCS 240 Contemporary Nutrition and Wellness
FCS 350 Lifespan Nutrition and Wellness
FCS 355 Nutrition for the Athlete
FCS 455 Community Nutrition
ES 300 Personal and Community Health
ES 320 Kinesiology
ES 325 Principles of Health and Physical Fitness Assessment
ES 335 Physiology of Exercise
ES 427 Health Promotion and Wellness
BIOL 112 Human Biology
BIOL 305 Introduction to Human Anatomy
CHEM 125 Fundamentals of Inorganic Chemistry
CHEM 250 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry
MATH 200 Introduction to Statistics
SOC 355 Counseling and Personal Development

The following courses are recommended electives to be chosen according to career objectives:

FCS 250 International Foods and Nutrition
FCS 460 Professional Family and Consumer Sciences Practicum
FCS/ES 480 Internship
BIOL 110 Principles of Biology I
CHEM 405 Biochemistry
And any fitness activity course

This is an interdisciplinary major offered for students interested in careers in wellness, health promotion and fitness leadership.

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Health and Human Sciences Minors

Coaching

Consists of 23 credit hours. The following courses are required:

ES 240 Introduction to Coaching
ES 260 First Aid and Safety
ES 325 Principles of Health and Physical Fitness Assessment
ES 345 Motor Behavior
ES 360 Organization and Administration of Health and Exercise Science
ES 368 Psychological Principles in Physical Education and Sport
ES 371–380 3 Teaching/Coaching Methods courses
ES 329 Practicum in Health and Exercise Science

This minor may be taken with a major in health and physical education or health and exercise science; however, there can be no overlap with electives listed on the health and physical education or health and exercise science plans of major.

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Equine Studies

Consists of 21 credit hours. The following courses are required:

ES 110 Introduction to Equine Science
ES 200 Equine Development and Behavior
ES 210 Equine Farm and Stable Management
ES 329 Practicum

Three additional courses chosen from:

ES 220 Theories of Riding
ES 305 Equine Lameness and Disease
ES 330 Conformation: Form and Function
ES 358 Equine Business Management
ES 364 Judging and Course Design
ES 400 Training and Schooling

This minor is designed as an excellent adjunct for students in several majors including business, biology and pre-veterinary science. In addition, students interested in pursuing further study and/or careers in various equine fields will benefit from the addition of this minor to their curriculum. Facilities that will be used in support of the equine studies minor include the Bridgewater College stables located on the eastern edge of the campus and the Bridgewater College Equestrian Center, located several miles southeast of campus and the home stable for the Bridgewater College Equestrian Program. A student pursuing the equine studies minor is required to take many classes to fulfill the minor off-site at the Bridgewater College Equestrian Center (BCEC). It is the responsibility of the student to secure transportation to the BCEC.

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Family and Consumer Sciences

Consists of 18 credit hours from FCS courses, nine hours of which must be chosen from courses numbered 300 or above.

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Nutrition and Wellness

Consists of 26 credit hours. The following courses are required:

FCS 240 Contemporary Nutrition and Wellness
FCS 355 Nutrition for the Athlete
CHEM 125 Fundamentals of Inorganic Chemistry
CHEM 250 Fundamental Organic Chemistry
ES 300 Personal and Community Health
ES 325 Principles of Health and Physical Fitness Assessment
ES 335 Physiology of Exercise
ES 427 Health Promotion and Wellness

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Pre-Professional Programs and Articulation Agreements

Majors in health and exercise science and athletic training can specifically prepare a student for graduate school admissions in the fields ofphysical therapy andoccupational therapy. The student should team with his/her advisor in order to devise a plan allowing the student to complete all prerequisite courses for graduate school admissions. An articulation agreement exists with Shenandoah University in physical therapy. Students applying to this program and meeting minimal requirements will be strongly considered for admission to the Doctorate of Physical Therapy Program. All questions regarding the articulation agreements should be directed to the student’s advisor or the department chair of health and human sciences.

General Education Requirements

In addition to major offerings, the department of health and human sciences contributes to the College’s general education program. All students are required to complete ES 105, and to develop skill in a physical activity by completing a one-credit activity course. No more than 4 credits in activity courses may be applied toward graduation. Activity courses meeting the College’s general education requirement are listed as follows:

ES 120 Bowling (1 Credit; F, S)
ES 123 Ballet (1 Credit; F, S)
ES 126 Aerobic Dancing (1 Credit; F, S)
ES 131 Lacrosse, Women’s Rules (1 Credit; F)
ES 135 Golf (1 Credit; F, S)
ES 141 Yoga (1 Credit; S)
ES 145 Handball-Racquetball (1 Credit; S)
ES 152 Snow Skiing (1 Credit; I)
ES 155 Snowboarding (1 Credit; I)
ES 162 Swimming (1 Credit; F, S)
ES 163 Aqua Aerobics (1 Credit; F, S)
ES 165 Tennis (1 Credit; F, S)
ES 175 Conditioning and Weight Training (1 Credit; F, S)
ES 177 Fitness/Jogging (1 Credit; F, S)
ES 180 Fitness and Weight Control (1 Credit; S)
ES 185 Horseback Riding (1 Credit; F, S)
ES 186 Medieval Swordsmanship (1 Credit; F)
ES 189 Ultimate Frisbee (1 Credit; F)
ES 362 Lifeguard Training (1 Credit; S)—successful completion leads to American Red Cross certification