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Courses of Instruction | College Catalog

Although there is variation by department, freshman courses are generally numbered 100–199; sophomore courses 200–299; and junior and senior courses 300–499. Graduate courses are num‑ bered 500‑699. Course numbers and descriptions listed herein apply to the 2016–2017 academic year.

Each course title includes a department abbreviation and course number. In the case of courses that satisfy specific categories of general education, the following letter designations may appear just after the course number: “W” for “Writing Intensive,” “E” for “Ethical Reasoning” and “X” for “Experiential Learning.” Courses always offered as Honors Courses will have a letter designation of “H” just after the course number. To the right of the course title, there appears another number, indicating the number of semester credit hours granted for the course, and one or more letters indicating when the course is offered: “F” stands for “Fall Semester,” “I” for “January Interterm” and “S” for “Spring Semester.” The College reserves the right to alter the schedule of courses as circumstances dictate.

Except for internships, independent studies, research, honors projects, interdisciplinary studies and foundational general education courses, the courses of instruction are organized by academic division and by department. Opportunities for qualified students to engage in internships, inde‑ pendent studies, research and honors projects are available in each department.

Division of Communication Studies, Fine Arts and Literature

Division Head: Dr. Jeff Pierson

Division of Humanities and Social Sciences

Division Head: Dr. Harriett Hayes

Division of Natural Sciences

Division Head: Dr. Phil Spickler

Division of Professional Studies

Division Head: Dr. Barbara Long

Interdisciplinary and Independent Studies

PDP-150 Critical Inquiry in the Liberal Arts 3 Credits F, S

Taught in the style of a seminar: a small group of students learn critical thinking skills through discussion, debate, peer review and brainstorming. Content varies from section to section. Incoming students rank topic preferences and then are assigned to a section. Focuses specifically on two key areas of personal development: (1) intellectual growth is stimulated through systematic critical questioning, and (2) a sense of community involvement and responsibility is developed through classroom group work, collaborative learning and a class community engagement project. The course also contains success skill exercises and college orientation information, including an introduction to the portfolio program.

General education: master core skills

PDP-350 Integrating the Liberal Arts 3 Credits F, S

Introduction to the academic community of Bridgewater College, the liberal arts and the skills of critical thinking specifically designed for transfer students. Taught in the style of a seminar: a small group of students engage in discussion, debate, peer review and brainstorming. Content varies from section to section. Incoming students rank topic preferences and then are assigned to a section. Focuses specifically on two key areas of personal development: (1) intellectual growth is stimulated through systematic critical questioning, and (2) a sense of community involvement and responsibility is developed through classroom group work, collaborative learning and a class community engagement project. The course also contains success skill exercises and college orientation information, including an introduction to the portfolio program.

General education: master core skills

PDP-450 Integrated Senior E-Portfolio 1 Credit F, S

The culminating experience for the Personal Development Portfolio program. Students create a senior e‑portfolio, which demonstrates and documents their experiences and growth over the four years, integrating both curricular and co‑curricular experiences, as well as experiential learning experiences, and discussing shortand long‑term goals and aspirations for the future. A passing grade, as determined by faculty evaluators from a variety of disciplines, is a requirement for graduation.

General education: integration of skills and ideas

IDS-100H, IDS-200H, IDS-300H, IDS-400H Course Linkage 1 Credit each F, S

Examination of the relationships and connections between two courses in different disciplines. Students complete a major paper or project that integrates concepts and themes of the two courses. One desiring to pursue a course linkage must submit a completed application at the time of registration.

Prerequisites: membership in Flory Honors Program and approval of instructors of both courses

IDS-201 Leadership Development Seminar 3 Credits F

Designed to help students become better leaders. Students come to understand, develop and apply the knowledge, skills, attitudes and vision associated with effective, socially responsible leadership.

IDS-311, IDS-312 Leadership Skills I, II 1 Credit each F, S

Provides the student with background information and practice opportunities for skills of leadership such as team building, goal setting, interpersonal communication, decision making and conflict resolution.

Different sets of skills are developed in Leadership Skills I and Leadership Skills II.

Prerequisites: sophomore standing

IDS-470H Honors Capstone Seminar 3 Credits S

Senior capstone experience for students in the Flory Honors Program, emphasizing the nature of scholarly inquiry and the interdisciplinary, liberal arts experience.

Prerequisites: membership in Flory Honors Program

480 Internship 3 Credits F, I, S

Provides an opportunity for a student to gain field experience in an area related to the student’s concentration or career goals. Supervision of an intern is provided by an appropriate faculty member and by a staff member of the agency or business in which the student is an intern. A student who wishes to engage in an internship must consult with the appropriate faculty member at least eight weeks in advance of the start of the term in which the internship is to be completed. A description of the internship, signed by the student and the faculty sponsor, must be filed with the director of internships by the first day of the semester prior to the start of the internship. Approval of each application for an internship is made by the director of internships based upon policies and guidelines as approved by the Council on Education and the faculty. To be considered for an internship, a student must have junior or senior status and at least a 2.00 grade point average. Internships are graded on an S or U basis. A student may enroll in an internship program for 3 credits per semester, and internship credit may be earned in subsequent semesters subject to the limitations that no more than two internships may be pursued in any one agency or business and a maximum of 9 credits in internships may be applied toward graduation.

490, 491 Independent Study/Research 3 Credits F, I, S

Upon approval of the department and the vice president and dean for academic affairs, a student with a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 or better may engage in an independent study or research project. One desiring to pursue independent study or research must submit a written description of the proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the provost and vice president for academic affairs prior to the last day of the drop and add period for the semester in which the study is to be conducted. At the end of the semester, the supervising professor files with the registrar a grade for the student and a description of the work accomplished. Credit may be received for not more than three independent studies or research projects.

499 Honors Project 3 Credits F, I, S

An honors project is one in which a student researches a subject, by examination of relevant literature or by experimentation or both; the student reports the results in an accurately documented and well‑writ ten paper or appropriate representation of the work. Whenever the study deals with the subject of an established course, the student is expected to go well beyond the usual work of the course in research and in assimilation of the results as revealed in the report. Juniors and seniors with a cumulative grade point average of 3.40 or above may register for an honors project. One desiring to pursue an honors project must submit a written description of his or her proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the provost and vice president for academic affairs prior to the last day of the drop and add period for the semester in which the study is to be conducted. Upon the completion of the Honors Project, the student must present an oral defense of his or her project. The final grade must include a satisfactory performance on the oral defense, assessed by a three‑faculty member team. The Project Advisor will authorize the make up of the oral defense team and will assign the final grade on the project. The honors project title will be noted on the student’s transcript. It is the student’s responsibility to provide a copy of the written paper or appropriate representation of the work to the library in compliance with specifications approved by the Council on Education. The library director arranges for binding and storage.

Flory Honors Program—see page 34.