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Communication Studies and Theatre | College Catalog

Majors

Communication, Technology and Culture
Theatre

Minors

Communication Studies
Theatre

The Department of Communication Studies and Theatre offers students the opportunity to study human communication practices in a variety of contexts. The department offers two majors—in communication, technology and culture and in theatre—and two minors—in communication studies and theatre—that each balance theoretical understanding with practical skills. The communication, technology and culture major focuses on ways in which ever- changing technological advances are impacting communication practices. The program provides a strong theoretical understanding of communication processes in a technology-based culture, including practical training that will allow students to become effective media practitioners. Courses examine both practical and theoretical approaches to the study of communication such as historical developments, policy implications, the influence of mass media and communication technologies, interpersonal relationships, and connections between communication and power relationships.

Students will learn how the methods of social science help us adapt messages across a variety of rhetorical situations. Communication courses are taught in an interactive manner combining lectures, discussion, in-class activities and hands-on experience. Students conduct theoretical and field research, write various types of academic and professional papers, design public relations campaigns, create blogs and deliver public presentations. In addition to working on their own, students in communication courses work in collaboration with other students gaining valuable teamwork skills.

Students majoring in communication, technology and culture are prepared for careers in a diverse group of occupations, such as public relations, advertising, sales, management, journalism and human resources. The major also helps prepare students for graduate studies.

The theatre major incorporates both theoretical and practical application of theatrical study and theatrical practice. The major in theatre seeks to foster a sense of wonder and excitement in students and community members, while continually asking: what is the role of the theatre and theatre artist in society, whether it be campus, a city the nation, or the world? A fundamental keystone is that lessons learned in the classroom and on the stage have application in the “real world.” Students learn how to take ideas and realize them through application of theatrical production and presentation. As an interdisciplinary field of study, the theatre major draws from many sources and disciplines and seeks to highlight how they can inform each other, along with a vigorous schedule of productions that put theory into practice.

Communication, Technology and Culture Major

Consists of a minimum of 48 credit hours:

Required Courses

21 credit hours consisting of the following courses:

An introduction to the history and influence ofcommunication technology in society. The classwill explore the various social politicalcultural and economic impacts of newcommunication technology. Major topics includethe origins of writing printing photographyfilm the telegraph and telephone radiotelevision and the internet.2017 Summer Session II offered as an onlinecourse

Unit(s): 3

Examines how electronic media industries havechanged the way we produce and consume mediaproducts. The course will examine how the digitalage has impacted notions of interactivityvirtual space media production networks andcredibility. Particular attention will be paid tothe social economic and political implicationsof these changes.2015 Summer Session II offered as an online course

Unit(s): 3

COMM/
Teaches students the basic skills of researchinginvestigating and writing in a variety of mediaformats including print and online news storiesaudio podcasts and press releases. Emphasis onidentification of the writing structures used bycontemporary media writers and utilization ofthese structures in original pieces researchedand written by the students.Prerequisites
Taught in the style of a seminar a small groupof students learn thinking skills throughdiscussion debate peer review andbrainstorming. Context varies from section tosection. Incoming students rank topic preferencesand then are assigned to a section. Focusesspecifically on two key areas of personaldevelopment (1) intellectual growth isstimulated through systematic criticalquestioning and (2) a sense of communityinvolvement and responsibility is developedthrough classroom group work collaborativelearning and a class community engagementproject. The course also contains success skillexercises and college orientation informationincluding an introduction to the portfolioprogram.General education master core skills2017 Fall Semester TopicsPDP-150-01 A Mans Man and a Womans WomanPDP-150-02 The Power of Physical Activity andSportPDP-150-03 Human Behavior in a Computational AgePDP-150-04 Strange IdeasPDP-150-05 After the ScourgePDP-150-06 Swimming in a sea of misinformationPDP-150-07 A Mans Man and a Womans WomanPDP-150-08 Creativity in the Arts SciencesBusiness Sports... in LifePDP-150-09 How to Rock the BoatPDP-150-10 Superhero NarrativesPDP-150-11 Dog is My Co-PilotPDP-150-12 Leadership and the Art of DecisionPDP-150-13 Free PlayPDP-150-14 Knowledge The Only FrontierPDP-150-15 Music Sweet Music PDP-150-16 The Fine Line between Glory & GuiltPDP-150-17 The Souls of Black Folk CriticalReadings By and About African Americans in the20th and 21st CenturiesPDP-150-18 Whos Sorry Now Thinking ThroughApologies Made on the Public StagePDP-150-19 Chickens Chickens ChickensPDP-150-20 The Narnian The Life and Imaginationof C.S. LewisPDP-150-21 Liberal Arts of the Living DeadPDP-150-22 Liberal Arts of the Living DeadPDP-150-23 Human Behavior in a Computational AgePDP-150-24 Latino USAPDP-150-25 Tweet Friend Pin Social Media &You as a 21st Century CitizenPDP-150-26 The Power of Physical Activity andSportPDP-150-29 Free PlayPDP-150-30 Media Narratives Spinning the Truth

Unit(s): 3
or
An introduction to the academic community ofBridgewater College to the liberal arts and tothe skills of critical thinking and reflectivewriting specifically designed for transferstudents. Transfer students will explore theunique challenges of integrating into a liberalarts educational environment and will begin theprocess of documenting their experiences andgrowth in the four dimensions of personaldevelopment intellectual growth and discoverycitizenship and community responsibility ethicaland spiritual growth and emotional maturationandphysical health.general education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
and ENG-110General education writing intensive2017 Summer Session II Online course

Unit(s): 3

Examines issues related to communication withinpersonal and professional relationships. Studentswill develop theoretical and practicalunderstandings of verbal and nonverbalcommunication the role of technology ininterpersonal communication and how interpersonalcommunication functions to develop negotiatemaintain and terminate relationships.

Unit(s): 3

This course will cover strategic planning andspecialized public relations issues. Issuesinclude risks crisis management socialmarketing campaigns and corporate and non-profitcommunication. Students will learn and applyadvanced public relations theories and skills tocase studies and real-life situations.Prerequisite COMMENG 255W2017 Summer Session II offered as an onlinecourse

Unit(s): 3

-or-
COMM/
Builds on the skills-oriented approach ofENGCOMM-255W by putting behind the practice ofwriting. Through individual and group writingprojects students work toward understanding theincreasingly complex definition of news itsblurring line with entertainment and the dynamicinterplay between technologies and audiences.Prerequisite COMMENG 255W or permission ofinstructorAlternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 3

Introduces quantitative and qualitative researchmethods used in the study of communication.Students learn to critically evaluate publishedresearch studies and how to conduct originalresearch. The course will provide specificinstruction and practice in survey writing andinterviewing.Prerequisite 6 credits in COMM (not includingCOMM 100)

Unit(s): 3

This capstone course explores practicalapplications of communication theory. Emphasiswill be placed on the process of writing andpublic speaking in multiple professional andpersonal rhetorical situations.Prerequisites COMM 350 and 9 additional creditsin COMM (not including COMM 100)

Unit(s): 3

Academic Citizenship Courses

Choose one of the following (3 credits):

An introduction to major theories and keyconcepts of persuasion. Using both social scienceand rhetorical criticism students will learn howindividualssocial movementsinstitutions createadapt and respond to persuasive messages.Students will evaluate the effectiveness ofpersuasive appeals based on the rhetoricalsituation. Throughout the course students willconsider the ethical implications of persuasivestrategies and contexts.2015 Summer Session II Online Course

Unit(s): 3

Study and application of communication theoriesand principles in an organizational context. Anexplanation of organizational communicationtheories and principles will allow students todevelop a theoretical and practical understandingof how communication affects the dynamics ofthe work environment. Emphasis will be placedon applying communication concepts to studentspersonal experience or participating in theorganizational environment.Alternate years offered 2016-20172017 Summer Session II offered as an online course

Unit(s): 3

Analytical survey of ethical and legal issuespertaining to communication professionalsfocusing on the new digital media landscape.Issues explored include First Amendments rightspublic affairs journalism copyright defamationobscenity censorship licensing corporate andgovernmental communications and the DigitalMillennium Act.Prerequisites
Taught in the style of a seminar a small groupof students learn thinking skills throughdiscussion debate peer review andbrainstorming. Context varies from section tosection. Incoming students rank topic preferencesand then are assigned to a section. Focusesspecifically on two key areas of personaldevelopment (1) intellectual growth isstimulated through systematic criticalquestioning and (2) a sense of communityinvolvement and responsibility is developedthrough classroom group work collaborativelearning and a class community engagementproject. The course also contains success skillexercises and college orientation informationincluding an introduction to the portfolioprogram.General education master core skills2017 Fall Semester TopicsPDP-150-01 A Mans Man and a Womans WomanPDP-150-02 The Power of Physical Activity andSportPDP-150-03 Human Behavior in a Computational AgePDP-150-04 Strange IdeasPDP-150-05 After the ScourgePDP-150-06 Swimming in a sea of misinformationPDP-150-07 A Mans Man and a Womans WomanPDP-150-08 Creativity in the Arts SciencesBusiness Sports... in LifePDP-150-09 How to Rock the BoatPDP-150-10 Superhero NarrativesPDP-150-11 Dog is My Co-PilotPDP-150-12 Leadership and the Art of DecisionPDP-150-13 Free PlayPDP-150-14 Knowledge The Only FrontierPDP-150-15 Music Sweet Music PDP-150-16 The Fine Line between Glory & GuiltPDP-150-17 The Souls of Black Folk CriticalReadings By and About African Americans in the20th and 21st CenturiesPDP-150-18 Whos Sorry Now Thinking ThroughApologies Made on the Public StagePDP-150-19 Chickens Chickens ChickensPDP-150-20 The Narnian The Life and Imaginationof C.S. LewisPDP-150-21 Liberal Arts of the Living DeadPDP-150-22 Liberal Arts of the Living DeadPDP-150-23 Human Behavior in a Computational AgePDP-150-24 Latino USAPDP-150-25 Tweet Friend Pin Social Media &You as a 21st Century CitizenPDP-150-26 The Power of Physical Activity andSportPDP-150-29 Free PlayPDP-150-30 Media Narratives Spinning the Truth

Unit(s): 3
or
An introduction to the academic community ofBridgewater College to the liberal arts and tothe skills of critical thinking and reflectivewriting specifically designed for transferstudents. Transfer students will explore theunique challenges of integrating into a liberalarts educational environment and will begin theprocess of documenting their experiences andgrowth in the four dimensions of personaldevelopment intellectual growth and discoverycitizenship and community responsibility ethicaland spiritual growth and emotional maturationandphysical health.general education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
and
Introduction to academic expository andargumentative writing with a focus on developingrhetorical skills and practices appropriate to arange of disciplines. Instruction in ethical useof material from sources and academicdocumentation systems. Supplementary writersworkshop required based on placement.General Education 2014 master core skill

Unit(s): 3
Ethical reasoning

Unit(s): 3

Introduces the range of communication practicesthat characterize contemporary politicalcampaigns. Students will process existingunderstandings of political communication theoryin order to design and implement a semester-longcampaign project.

Unit(s): 3

Advanced Public Speaking/Performance Courses

Choose one of the following (3 credits):

This course provides students with a foundationalknowledge of classical principles of oralrhetoric and modern theories of the conventionsof argumentation. Students will engage incritical examination of issues and the use ofargumentation of support and defend a position.Upon completion of this course students will beable to construct and evaluate factual value andpolicy claims.Prerequisite COMM 100

Unit(s): 3

This course will focus on invention andstructuredimprovisation as tools to explore being inthe moment both on and off stage. Focusing onthebody and voice through theatre games creativedramatics role-play storytelling clowningautobiographical performance and movementimprovisation skills will be approached from twoperspectives concentration and action. Throughresponding to each others playfulness ingenuityand creativity students will be encouraged tobreak through set thinking and movement patternsthat may have limited them in the past. Thisclass is not just for the theatre student Whilethe work is grounded in theatre it can beapplied to any discipline.

Unit(s): 3

Acting provides the student with an organized andpractical approach to acting. A systematicapproach to acting through a thorough examinationand application of Konstantin Stanislavskissystem of acting with in depth attention to thetechnique of the actor and their use of body andvoice. Textual analysis scene work monologuesauditioning performance pieces and varioustraining exercises will be used. No theatreexperience is necessary. Corequisite PDP-150 or PDP-350Alternate years offered 2017-2018FILA fine arts & music (effective 2016-17)

Unit(s): 3

Environmental theatre began in the 1960s inresponse to the social and political climate ofthe time. Performers and performance groupspushedthe boundaries of what was traditionally thoughtof as theatre and as a result restructured andreinvigorated the fundamental understanding ofwhat performance was and its function withinsociety. Environmental theatre continues to bea powerful vehicle for social commentary. Theobjective of this course is three-fold tointroduce the student to the cultural socialandpolitical richness of environmental theatreincluding site-specific performance to provide ahistorical understanding of the period byhighlighting how the original practitioners andtheir works were directly influenced by culturalevents of the time and to involve the studentinthe process of creating and performing their ownindividual and group site-specific environmentalperformance piece.Corequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350General Education Fine arts and music

Unit(s): 3

Visual Design Courses

Choose one of the following (3 credits):

A studio project-based introduction to theelements and principles of 2-D and 3-D design invisual art and communication contexts. Emphasisis on visual problem solving mastery of visualdesign principles technical proficiency andcritical analysis of how visual imagescommunicate. This course provides a foundationfor students planning to take advanced courses inany art media and other fields in which visualimagery plays an important role. As a stand-alonecourse Art 120 provides critical and practicalskills related to visual communication.

Unit(s): 3

Design and construct websites using current HTMLand CSS standards and digital tools includingBrackets Dreamweaver and Photoshop. Emphasis ondesign process content development andprofessional workflows.

Unit(s): 3

A studio based exploration into visualcommunication with typography and images usingAdobe Creative Cloud applications. Emphasis isplaced on the design process and creativethinking.Corequisite ENG 110General Education fine arts and music

Unit(s): 3

Learn to skillfully and confidently use digitalcameras and software including Adobe Lightroomand Photoshop to create compelling photographs.Emphasis is placed on composition visualcommunication and creative process in acontemporary photography context. Note Studentsmust provide a digital camera capable of manualexposure and Raw image capture.Corequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350General Education fine arts and music

Unit(s): 3

Produce short videos using digital cameras andediting software. Emphasis is placed ondeveloping skills in camera operation lightingaudio and editing and development of effectivenarrative structure and non-fiction storytelling.Note Students must provide a DSLR or compactcamera capable of HD video capture and externalhard drive appropriate for video editing. Corequisite COMM 100General Education fine arts and music

Unit(s): 3

This course is designed to provide students fieldexperience in media production media writingmedia management andor media relations. Prior tosigning up for this course students will workwith the instructor to identify a fieldexperience site where they can either help createcontent at a media outlet such as atelevisionradio station or film productionstudio or where they can practice mediarelations for a business or non-profitorganization. The course requires students tocomplete (1) an initial face-to-face meetingwith the course instructor (2) online modulesabout communication-related issues in theworkplace (3) an initial and exit interview withtheir site supervisor (4) 100 hours of work inthe field (5) reflective short essay assignmentsand (6) a final project consisting of an onlineportfolio of work they complete during the fieldexperience. Students may take the course up totwo times for credit but each time must be at adifferent site. Prerequisites COMM-100 and COMM-255WCorequisites Junior standing in majorFILA general education experiential learning

Unit(s): 3
(with visual design focus, must be approved by department)
Upon approval of the Department and the VicePresident and Dean of Academic Affairs a studentwith a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 orbetter may engage in an independent study orresearch project. One desiring to pursueindependent study or research must submit awritten description of the proposed work to thechair of the appropriate department and to theVice President and Dean for Academic Affairs bythe first day of the semester in which the studyis to be conducted. At the end of the semesterthe supervising professor files with the Registrara grade for the student and a description of thework accomplished. Credit may be received for notmore than three independent studies or researchprojects.

Unit(s): 3
(with visual design focus, must be approved by department)
This course is an introduction to the manyelements involved in Western theatre productionwith emphases on two of the primary areas ofdesign construction and implementation sceneryand costumes and an integration with stagemanagement. The class will explore conceptstechniques equipment and materials necessary fora successful theatrical production emphasizingproblem solving through researchexperimentation and collaboration. Studentswill be challenged to engage and understand theinterrelationships between the various elementsinvolved in mounting a stage production and howthese elements relate to and affect the otheraspects of dramatic art. Previous experiencewith theatre is not necessary.Corequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350General education fine arts & music

Unit(s): 3

Experiential Courses

Choose two of the following (6 credits):

This course is a skills-and-theory class whichapplies critical thinking to discuss and solvepractical problems in news media production. Thiscourse prepares students for the convergence ofmedia providing practical experience inmultiplatform media writing and productionincluding print radio TV and web journalism.Work includes approximately three hours outsidethe class and one hour inside each week. Coursemay be repeated for a total of 3 credits.

Unit(s): 1
X (Newspaper or Radio, 3-semesters total)
This course examines the history of the Americantelevision and film studio system its influenceon society and the processes of moderntelevisionand film production. The course will includethree days on the Bridgewater campus and a 14-day trip to Los Angeles. While in Los Angelesthe class will tour several studios (includingParamount Pictures Warner Brothers NBCtelevision and Universal Studios) participateas audience members on a variety of televisionshows talk with members of the television andfilm industry and visit several media-relatedmuseums.Additional costs associated with travel.2017 Interterm Estimated Extra Cost 2900Prerequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350 permission ofthe instructorExperiential learning

Unit(s): 3

-or-
This course examines the historical similaritiesand differences between American media andEuropean media. The course will involveapproximately a week of classes on theBridgewater campus prior to traveling to severallocations throughout Europe. Three major themeswill be explored 1) the use of persuasion andpropaganda techniques employed during World WarII and the Cold War 2) the development of theEuropean television and film industry (prior toWWII and after it) and 3) issues of mediaconglomeration globalization and the influenceof the American film and television industry onEurope. Cities that may be toured includeLondon Munich Prague Berlin and Paris. (Theexact cities to be visited will change each yearbased on availability of speakers filmfestivals and museum special exhibits.)Additional costs associated with travel.2018 May Term Estimated Extra Cost 3100Prerequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350General Education world cultures Experiential learning

Unit(s): 3
European Media and Culture
-or-
An exploration of the rich and varied theatricalscenes in London through nightly attendance atprofessional and nonprofessional productions.The group attends professional West Endclassical modern and musical productions. Amusic hall performance and holiday pantomime aswell as lively nonprofessional theatre in theLondon suburbs are on the itinerary. Daytimebackstage tours and visits to the Theatre Museumand other locations of theatrical historicaland cultural interests complement the experienceas do side-trips to Stratford-upon-Avon andOxford.Offered on demand.Corequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350General education fine arts and musicEstimated Extra Cost 3500Offered on demand

Unit(s): 3

Introduces students to the burgeoning nonprofitsector of American society. Students learn whatmakes an organization a nonprofit explore thepurposes of a nonprofit sector in societyconsider the often overlooked field of nonprofitmedia and explore the challenges andopportunities of working in with and fornonprofit organizations.Estimated Extra Cost 300Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 and COMM 100Experiential learning

Unit(s): 3

This course is designed to provide students fieldexperience in media production media writingmedia management andor media relations. Prior tosigning up for this course students will workwith the instructor to identify a fieldexperience site where they can either help createcontent at a media outlet such as atelevisionradio station or film productionstudio or where they can practice mediarelations for a business or non-profitorganization. The course requires students tocomplete (1) an initial face-to-face meetingwith the course instructor (2) online modulesabout communication-related issues in theworkplace (3) an initial and exit interview withtheir site supervisor (4) 100 hours of work inthe field (5) reflective short essay assignmentsand (6) a final project consisting of an onlineportfolio of work they complete during the fieldexperience. Students may take the course up totwo times for credit but each time must be at adifferent site. Prerequisites COMM-100 and COMM-255WCorequisites Junior standing in majorFILA general education experiential learning

Unit(s): 3

Upon approval of the Department and the VicePresident and Dean of Academic Affairs a studentwith a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 orbetter may engage in an independent study orresearch project. One desiring to pursueindependent study or research must submit awritten description of the proposed work to thechair of the appropriate department and to theVice President and Dean for Academic Affairs bythe first day of the semester in which the studyis to be conducted. At the end of the semesterthe supervising professor files with the Registrara grade for the student and a description of thework accomplished. Credit may be received for notmore than three independent studies or researchprojects.

Unit(s): 3
(with department approval)
MUS-
This course provides a hands-on introduction tothe world of modern multi-track recording.Students will gain experience with the equipmentfundamental to audio engineering and productionincluding recording consoles microphonesequalizers time-based effects and Avid ProTools the industry standard digital audioworkstation. Participants will engage in avariety of projects which demonstrate the breadthof activity of an audio engineer. These includecreating a podcast and engaging in a series ofreal world sessions with professional recordingartists. Through these sessions the techniquesof recording editing mixing and mastering audiowill be explored. Additional costs for off-campus travel 500 andstudents must provide their own transportation toBlue Sprocket Studio Harrisonburg2018 spring semester meets first 12 weeks

Unit(s): 3

An introduction to the many elements involved inWestern theatre production with a special focuson stage management and emphases on two of theprimary areas of design construction andimplementation lighting and sound. The classwill explore concepts techniques equipment andmaterials necessary for a successful theatricalproduction emphasizing problem solving throughresearch experimentation and collaboration. Students will be challenged to engage andunderstand the interrelationships between thevarious elements involved in mounting a stageproduction and how these elements relate to andaffect the other aspects of dramatic art. Previous experience with theatre is notnecessary.Co-requisites PDP-150 or PDP-350

Unit(s): 3

Additional Courses

An additional 12 credit hours are required from the following list of courses (only 6 credit hours may be taken from courses without the COMM prefix):

COMM All courses designated COMM (except COMM 100)

A studio project-based introduction to theelements and principles of 2-D and 3-D design invisual art and communication contexts. Emphasisis on visual problem solving mastery of visualdesign principles technical proficiency andcritical analysis of how visual imagescommunicate. This course provides a foundationfor students planning to take advanced courses inany art media and other fields in which visualimagery plays an important role. As a stand-alonecourse Art 120 provides critical and practicalskills related to visual communication.

Unit(s): 3

Design and construct websites using current HTMLand CSS standards and digital tools includingBrackets Dreamweaver and Photoshop. Emphasis ondesign process content development andprofessional workflows.

Unit(s): 3

A studio based exploration into visualcommunication with typography and images usingAdobe Creative Cloud applications. Emphasis isplaced on the design process and creativethinking.Corequisite ENG 110General Education fine arts and music

Unit(s): 3

Learn to skillfully and confidently use digitalcameras and software including Adobe Lightroomand Photoshop to create compelling photographs.Emphasis is placed on composition visualcommunication and creative process in acontemporary photography context. Note Studentsmust provide a digital camera capable of manualexposure and Raw image capture.Corequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350General Education fine arts and music

Unit(s): 3

Produce short videos using digital cameras andediting software. Emphasis is placed ondeveloping skills in camera operation lightingaudio and editing and development of effectivenarrative structure and non-fiction storytelling.Note Students must provide a DSLR or compactcamera capable of HD video capture and externalhard drive appropriate for video editing. Corequisite COMM 100General Education fine arts and music

Unit(s): 3

Advanced writing course in composing and revisingessays reviews and other texts for potentialpublication or other professional purposes.Explores rhetorical theory and analysis ofrhetorical elements (audience purposeorganization styleand so forth) of published texts teachingapplication of this knowledge to students ownwriting. Conducted as a writing workshop.Prerequisites ENG 110

Unit(s): 3

An intensive workshop providing an opportunity togain deeper insight into literary techniques andpractices through the production of originalshortand longer works of fiction poetry and dramaaswell as creative expository forms. Students willdevelop a single but substantial literaryproject unified by a common theme or themes.Groupworkshops and individual conferences will provideextensive feedback and critical response as thestudent progresses through the project.Prerequisites ENG 110

Unit(s): 3

Advanced writing course in composing reportsproposals instructions brochures digitalinformation and other workplace documents.Principles of document design strategies forincorporating graphic elements in their texts andmethods of editing are also emphasized.Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 and ENG 110Writing Intensive

Unit(s): 3

Studies the nature of writing as it shaped bydigital technologies including desktoppublishing document design and electronicportfolios. Implications of these media forwriting in both theory and practice are alsoemphasized.Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 and ENG 110Writing Intensive Course

Unit(s): 3

Communication Studies Minor

Consists of a minimum of 18 credit hours.

Required courses (9 credits):

An introduction to the history and influence ofcommunication technology in society. The classwill explore the various social politicalcultural and economic impacts of newcommunication technology. Major topics includethe origins of writing printing photographyfilm the telegraph and telephone radiotelevision and the internet.2017 Summer Session II offered as an onlinecourse

Unit(s): 3

Examines how electronic media industries havechanged the way we produce and consume mediaproducts. The course will examine how the digitalage has impacted notions of interactivityvirtual space media production networks andcredibility. Particular attention will be paid tothe social economic and political implicationsof these changes.2015 Summer Session II offered as an online course

Unit(s): 3

Examines issues related to communication withinpersonal and professional relationships. Studentswill develop theoretical and practicalunderstandings of verbal and nonverbalcommunication the role of technology ininterpersonal communication and how interpersonalcommunication functions to develop negotiatemaintain and terminate relationships.

Unit(s): 3

Choose any other 9 credit hours with a COMM prefix (other than COMM 100)

Theatre Minor

As you minor in theatre, you’ll have the opportunity to not only study great theatrical works, but also gain hands-on experience in any aspect of stage production. Theatre faculty and students produce and direct several major productions each year.

Consists of 21 credit hours. The following courses are required:

9 credit hours of the following:

This course is an introduction to the manyelements involved in Western theatre productionwith emphases on two of the primary areas ofdesign construction and implementation sceneryand costumes and an integration with stagemanagement. The class will explore conceptstechniques equipment and materials necessary fora successful theatrical production emphasizingproblem solving through researchexperimentation and collaboration. Studentswill be challenged to engage and understand theinterrelationships between the various elementsinvolved in mounting a stage production and howthese elements relate to and affect the otheraspects of dramatic art. Previous experiencewith theatre is not necessary.Corequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350General education fine arts & music

Unit(s): 3

-or-
An introduction to the many elements involved inWestern theatre production with a special focuson stage management and emphases on two of theprimary areas of design construction andimplementation lighting and sound. The classwill explore concepts techniques equipment andmaterials necessary for a successful theatricalproduction emphasizing problem solving throughresearch experimentation and collaboration. Students will be challenged to engage andunderstand the interrelationships between thevarious elements involved in mounting a stageproduction and how these elements relate to andaffect the other aspects of dramatic art. Previous experience with theatre is notnecessary.Co-requisites PDP-150 or PDP-350

Unit(s): 3

Traces the development of dramaticart and the history of theatrical productionfrom its ritual beginnings to the EnglishRestoration. It will place dramatic art andtheatre history in context by engaging with thesocial political and cultural conditions ofspecific historical moments. Topics of study willinclude Greek Drama Roman spectacle SanskritDrama Noh Drama early Medieval religious andsecular theatre Italian commedia dellarteRenaissance and Baroque pageantry and theEnglishRestoration. The approach will be a documentaryone. Students will read specific play texts inconjunction with primary evidence both texturaland pictorial using both to illuminate thecreation and history of theatre.Corequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350General Education Fine arts and musicAlternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 3

-or-
Survey ofpost-Restoration theatrical culture history andproduction forms. Though it is a continuation ofthe World Theatre History I the student need nothave taken the previous course. Students willbegin examining theatrical history and expressionin Turkey China and Japan and move across theEuropean continent focusing on the rise ofEuropean modernity. Students will cover Romantictheatre and opera melodrama and poeticspectacleRealism Naturalism and the independent theatremovement as well as the innovation of early 20thcentury theatrical practitioners. The approachwill be a documentary one. Students will readspecific play texts in conjunction with primaryevidence textural and pictorial using both toilluminate the creation and history of theatre.Corequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350 and ENG 110General Education Fine arts & musicAlternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 3

Acting provides the student with an organized andpractical approach to acting. A systematicapproach to acting through a thorough examinationand application of Konstantin Stanislavskissystem of acting with in depth attention to thetechnique of the actor and their use of body andvoice. Textual analysis scene work monologuesauditioning performance pieces and varioustraining exercises will be used. No theatreexperience is necessary. Corequisite PDP-150 or PDP-350Alternate years offered 2017-2018FILA fine arts & music (effective 2016-17)

Unit(s): 3

-or-
This course will introduce the student to thephysical vocal and mental worlds of variousstyles and techniques of non-realisticperformance traditions. Students will experimentwith a variety of acting styles and techniquesincluding physical masked post-modernnon-western and devised performance. Thiscourse includes interfaith components of easternmeditative movement and centering practices asthey are linked to acting methods and techniques. This course is a practical expression of thetheoretical and historical. Textual analysisscene work monologues and various trainingexercises will be used. Corequisite PDP-150 or PDP-350

Unit(s): 3

3 credit hours of the following:

Production laboratory requiring intenseinvolvement with the process of translating aplay text from script to performance. Requiresthe student to work independently and as anensemble interpreting rehearsing and performinga play. Professionalism and dedication to thetheatrical process are stressed. In-class andout-of-class work is essential. May be repeatedfor credit. A maximum of 6 credits in ProductionLaboratoryApplied Performance may be appliedtoward graduation.Prerequisites Audition and permission ofinstructor

Unit(s): 1

-or-
Application of technology associated withlighting costumes and makeup scenery andproperties scenic painting technical directionand sound as associated with theatricalproduction. Requires the student to workindependently and with faculty andor guestdesigner to interpret create and implementeffective designs. Professionalism anddedication to the theatrical process arestressed. In-class and out-of-class work isessential. May be repeated for credit. A maximum of 6credits in Production LaboratoryAppliedPerformance may be applied toward graduation.Prerequisite permission of instructor.

Unit(s): 1

-or-
Application of techniques associated with stagemanagement dramaturgy and assistant directingas associated with theatrical production. Requires the student to work independently andwith faculty andor guest artists to interpretcreate and implement effective theatricalperformances. Professionalism and dedication to the theatricalprocess are stressed. In-class and out-of-classwork is essential. May be repeated for credit. A maximum of 6 credits in ProductionLaboratoryApplied Performance may be appliedtoward graduation.Prerequisites permission of instructor

Unit(s): 1

An additional 9 credit hours must be chosen from the following courses:

Theatre Practice and Design:

A studio project-based introduction to theelements and principles of 2-D and 3-D design invisual art and communication contexts. Emphasisis on visual problem solving mastery of visualdesign principles technical proficiency andcritical analysis of how visual imagescommunicate. This course provides a foundationfor students planning to take advanced courses inany art media and other fields in which visualimagery plays an important role. As a stand-alonecourse Art 120 provides critical and practicalskills related to visual communication.

Unit(s): 3

A studio based exploration of drawing fromobservation using basic materials like graphiteand charcoal. This course investigates drawing asa process generating and critically evaluatingvisual ideas as well as producing visual imagery.Art 130 is a foundation course for studentsplanning to take advanced art courses in anymedium. As a stand-alone this course buildspractical and theoretical skills in seeing andmaking the 2-D images we call drawings. Corequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350General Education fine arts & music

Unit(s): 3

A project based investigation of the materialspractices and aesthetics of painting withemphasis on how these three elements worktogether to create compelling 2-D colored images.This course provides practical and theoreticalfoundations for four hundred-level courses indrawing and painting and for independent work inthese media.Corequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350General Education fine arts and music

Unit(s): 3

Produce short videos using digital cameras andediting software. Emphasis is placed ondeveloping skills in camera operation lightingaudio and editing and development of effectivenarrative structure and non-fiction storytelling.Note Students must provide a DSLR or compactcamera capable of HD video capture and externalhard drive appropriate for video editing. Corequisite COMM 100General Education fine arts and music

Unit(s): 3

Emphasis on factors influencing fashion includingthe sociological psychological and physiologicalaspects of clothing and basic construction ofclothing.

Unit(s): 3

No musical experience required. An introductionto reading music scales key signaturesintervals rhythms instruments and score study.Hands-on musical activities include eurhythmicssinging and the playing of simple percussive andmelodic instruments. Serves as a prerequisite tosome courses in music students may place out ofthis course by passing the music fundamentalsdiagnostic test.Corequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350General education fine arts & music

Unit(s): 3

-or-
Diatonic harmony voice leading and phrasestructure. Aural skills include sight singing andmelodic dictation.Prerequisites MUS 110

Unit(s): 3

This course is an introduction to the manyelements involved in Western theatre productionwith emphases on two of the primary areas ofdesign construction and implementation sceneryand costumes and an integration with stagemanagement. The class will explore conceptstechniques equipment and materials necessary fora successful theatrical production emphasizingproblem solving through researchexperimentation and collaboration. Studentswill be challenged to engage and understand theinterrelationships between the various elementsinvolved in mounting a stage production and howthese elements relate to and affect the otheraspects of dramatic art. Previous experiencewith theatre is not necessary.Corequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350General education fine arts & music

Unit(s): 3

-or-
An introduction to the many elements involved inWestern theatre production with a special focuson stage management and emphases on two of theprimary areas of design construction andimplementation lighting and sound. The classwill explore concepts techniques equipment andmaterials necessary for a successful theatricalproduction emphasizing problem solving throughresearch experimentation and collaboration. Students will be challenged to engage andunderstand the interrelationships between thevarious elements involved in mounting a stageproduction and how these elements relate to andaffect the other aspects of dramatic art. Previous experience with theatre is notnecessary.Co-requisites PDP-150 or PDP-350

Unit(s): 3

A study of specific topics related to theatreincluding Movement for the PerformerPlaywriting Set Design Lighting Design andCostume Design. May be taken more than onceprovided different topics are covered. Corequisite PDP-150 or PDP-350 General Education Fine Arts and Music &Experiential Learning

Unit(s): 3

Practical study of the various theoriestechniques and materials used in scenic painting.Focusing on theory and practice encompasses asystematic approach to painting theatricalscenery. Emphasis on traditional scene paintingtechniques including material selection (brushesand paints) and their practical applicationthrough design reproductions and faux finishesas well as the tools and paints that have beendeveloped to support those techniques. Studentslearn how the theories and techniques of scenicpainting have changed historically and how theseunique changes have impacted the materials andtechniques utilized by the scenic painter.Engages with the unique qualities of differenttypes of paint noting how they perform ondifferent types of materials and how thatknowledge can be used to create effectiveresults. Projects include painting stage dropscreating stained glass windows with paint fauxmarble and wood grain finishes photos anddesigner renderings. This course carries a 25materials fee.Corequisites PDP-150 or PDP-350General education fine arts and music

Unit(s): 3

An exploration of the rich and varied theatricalscenes in London through nightly attendance atprofessional and nonprofessional productions.The group attends professional West Endclassical modern and musical productions. Amusic hall performance and holiday pantomime aswell as lively nonprofessional theatre in theLondon suburbs are on the itinerary. Daytimebackstage tours and visits to the Theatre Museumand other locations of theatrical historicaland cultural interests complement the experienceas do side-trips to Stratford-upon-Avon andOxford.Offered on demand.Corequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350General education fine arts and musicEstimated Extra Cost 3500Offered on demand

Unit(s): 3

THEA-340
The internship program provides an opportunityfora student to gain field experience in an arearelated to the students concentration or careergoals. Supervision of an intern is provided byanappropriate faculty member and by a staff memberof the agency or business in which the student isan intern. A student who wishes to engage in aninternship must consult with the appropriatefaculty member at least eight weeks in advance ofthe start of the term in which the internship isto be completed. A description of theinternshipsigned by the student and the faculty sponsormust be filed with the Director of Internships bythe first day of the semester prior to the startof the internship. Approval of each applicationfor an internship is made by the Director ofInternships based upon policies and guidelines asapproved by the Council on Education and thefaculty. To be considered for an internship astudent must have junior or senior status and atleast a 2.00 grade point average. Internshipsaregraded on an S or U basis. A student may enrollin an internship program for three credits persemester and internship credit may be earned insubsequent semesters subject to the limitationsthat no more than two internships may be pursuedin any one agency or business and a maximum ofnine credits in internships may be applied towardgraduation.

Unit(s): 3

Upon approval of the Department and the VicePresident and Dean of Academic Affairs a studentwith a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 orbetter may engage in an independent study orresearch project. One desiring to pursueindependent study or research must submit awritten description of the proposed work to thechair of the appropriate department and to theVice President and Dean for Academic Affairs bythe first day of the semester in which the studyis to be conducted. At the end of the semesterthe supervising professor files with the Registrara grade for the student and a description of thework accomplished. Credit may be received for notmore than three independent studies or researchprojects.

Unit(s): 3

Upon approval of the Department and the VicePresident and Dean of Academic Affairs a studentwith a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 orbetter may engage in an independent study orresearch project. One desiring to pursueindependent study or research must submit awritten description of the proposed work to thechair of the appropriate department and to theVice President and Dean for Academic Affairs bythe first day of the semester in which the studyis to be conducted. At the end of the semesterthe supervising professor files with theRegistrara grade for the student and a description of thework accomplished. Credit may be received fornotmore than three independent studies or researchprojects.

Unit(s): 3

THEA-499

History, Theory and Criticism:

Select 1 course (3 credit hours) from list below or other course(s) approved by department.

Environmental theatre began in the 1960s inresponse to the social and political climate ofthe time. Performers and performance groupspushedthe boundaries of what was traditionally thoughtof as theatre and as a result restructured andreinvigorated the fundamental understanding ofwhat performance was and its function withinsociety. Environmental theatre continues to bea powerful vehicle for social commentary. Theobjective of this course is three-fold tointroduce the student to the cultural socialandpolitical richness of environmental theatreincluding site-specific performance to provide ahistorical understanding of the period byhighlighting how the original practitioners andtheir works were directly influenced by culturalevents of the time and to involve the studentinthe process of creating and performing their ownindividual and group site-specific environmentalperformance piece.Corequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350General Education Fine arts and music

Unit(s): 3

THEA/
Examination of theatrical literature and formsfrom the late 19th century well-made playsRealism Expressionism Futurism and Symbolismto Epic theatre and the Theatre of the Absurd.Playwrights such as Henrik Ibsen Bernard ShawAnton Chekhov Eugene ONeill Bertolt BrechtSamuel Beckett and others will be studied. Thegoals of this course are for students to gain anunderstanding of the scope history techniquesand influence of Modern Drama.Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 and ENG 110General Education Literature & Writing IntensiveAlternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 3

THEA/
Contemporary theatrical forms of American andBritish drama. Begins with post-World War IIdramatic works and moves sequentially to thepresent day. Areas of attention include theangry young men metadrama gender race andethnicity the new brutalism and contemporarydocudrama. Particular focus on how play textsengage with the cultural and historical moment oftheir creation. Students gain an understanding ofthe scope history techniques and influence ofcontemporary drama. Playwrights such as JohnOsborne Edward Albee Eduard Bond Jose RiveraMartin McDonagh Tony Kushner Sarah Kane SuzanLori-Parks Nilo Cruz Moises Kaufman Sarah Ruhland others are studied.Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 and ENG 110General Education Literature & Writing IntensiveAlternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 3

Analytical study of the history of dramaticmusicespecially opera and oratorio. Listening andreading assignments focus on specific composersand works as they relate to historical trends inmusical style.Prerequisite
Taught in the style of a seminar a small groupof students learn thinking skills throughdiscussion debate peer review andbrainstorming. Context varies from section tosection. Incoming students rank topic preferencesand then are assigned to a section. Focusesspecifically on two key areas of personaldevelopment (1) intellectual growth isstimulated through systematic criticalquestioning and (2) a sense of communityinvolvement and responsibility is developedthrough classroom group work collaborativelearning and a class community engagementproject. The course also contains success skillexercises and college orientation informationincluding an introduction to the portfolioprogram.General education master core skills2017 Fall Semester TopicsPDP-150-01 A Mans Man and a Womans WomanPDP-150-02 The Power of Physical Activity andSportPDP-150-03 Human Behavior in a Computational AgePDP-150-04 Strange IdeasPDP-150-05 After the ScourgePDP-150-06 Swimming in a sea of misinformationPDP-150-07 A Mans Man and a Womans WomanPDP-150-08 Creativity in the Arts SciencesBusiness Sports... in LifePDP-150-09 How to Rock the BoatPDP-150-10 Superhero NarrativesPDP-150-11 Dog is My Co-PilotPDP-150-12 Leadership and the Art of DecisionPDP-150-13 Free PlayPDP-150-14 Knowledge The Only FrontierPDP-150-15 Music Sweet Music PDP-150-16 The Fine Line between Glory & GuiltPDP-150-17 The Souls of Black Folk CriticalReadings By and About African Americans in the20th and 21st CenturiesPDP-150-18 Whos Sorry Now Thinking ThroughApologies Made on the Public StagePDP-150-19 Chickens Chickens ChickensPDP-150-20 The Narnian The Life and Imaginationof C.S. LewisPDP-150-21 Liberal Arts of the Living DeadPDP-150-22 Liberal Arts of the Living DeadPDP-150-23 Human Behavior in a Computational AgePDP-150-24 Latino USAPDP-150-25 Tweet Friend Pin Social Media &You as a 21st Century CitizenPDP-150-26 The Power of Physical Activity andSportPDP-150-29 Free PlayPDP-150-30 Media Narratives Spinning the Truth

Unit(s): 3
or
An introduction to the academic community ofBridgewater College to the liberal arts and tothe skills of critical thinking and reflectivewriting specifically designed for transferstudents. Transfer students will explore theunique challenges of integrating into a liberalarts educational environment and will begin theprocess of documenting their experiences andgrowth in the four dimensions of personaldevelopment intellectual growth and discoverycitizenship and community responsibility ethicaland spiritual growth and emotional maturationandphysical health.general education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
General Education Fine arts & musicEstimated Extra Cost 3800

Unit(s): 3
X
Critical examination of Shakespearesdevelopment as a dramatist and of his basicthemes. Approximately 12 plays are studied.Prerequisites ENG 110General Education Literature

Unit(s): 3

ENG-400 (with department approval)
The internship program provides an opportunityfora student to gain field experience in an arearelated to the students concentration or careergoals. Supervision of an intern is provided byanappropriate faculty member and by a staff memberof the agency or business in which the student isan intern. A student who wishes to engage in aninternship must consult with the appropriatefaculty member at least eight weeks in advance ofthe start of the term in which the internship isto be completed. A description of theinternshipsigned by the student and the faculty sponsormust be filed with the Director of Internships bythe first day of the semester prior to the startof the internship. Approval of each applicationfor an internship is made by the Director ofInternships based upon policies and guidelines asapproved by the Council on Education and thefaculty. To be considered for an internship astudent must have junior or senior status and atleast a 2.00 grade point average. Internshipsaregraded on an S or U basis. A student may enrollin an internship program for three credits persemester and internship credit may be earned insubsequent semesters subject to the limitationsthat no more than two internships may be pursuedin any one agency or business and a maximum ofnine credits in internships may be applied towardgraduation.

Unit(s): 3

Upon approval of the Department and the VicePresident and Dean of Academic Affairs a studentwith a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 orbetter may engage in an independent study orresearch project. One desiring to pursueindependent study or research must submit awritten description of the proposed work to thechair of the appropriate department and to theVice President and Dean for Academic Affairs bythe first day of the semester in which the studyis to be conducted. At the end of the semesterthe supervising professor files with the Registrara grade for the student and a description of thework accomplished. Credit may be received for notmore than three independent studies or researchprojects.

Unit(s): 3

Upon approval of the Department and the VicePresident and Dean of Academic Affairs a studentwith a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 orbetter may engage in an independent study orresearch project. One desiring to pursueindependent study or research must submit awritten description of the proposed work to thechair of the appropriate department and to theVice President and Dean for Academic Affairs bythe first day of the semester in which the studyis to be conducted. At the end of the semesterthe supervising professor files with theRegistrara grade for the student and a description of thework accomplished. Credit may be received fornotmore than three independent studies or researchprojects.

Unit(s): 3

THEA-49

 

Endorsement in Theatre Arts (PreK to 12)

Consists of the education course sequence required for secondary licensure and the following courses:

This course is an introduction to the many elements involved in Western theatre production with emphases on two of the primary areas of design construction and implementation scenery and costumes and an integration with stage management. The class will explore concepts techniques equipment and materials necessary for a successful theatrical production emphasizing problem solving through research experimentation and collaboration. Students will be challenged to engage and understand the interrelationships between the various elements involved in mounting a stage production and how these elements relate to and affect the other aspects of dramatic art. Previous experience with theatre is not necessary. Corequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 General education fine arts & music

Unit(s): 3

Traces the development of dramatic art and the history of theatrical production from its ritual beginnings to the English Restoration. It will place dramatic art and theatre history in context by engaging with the social political and cultural conditions of specific historical moments. Topics of study will include Greek Drama Roman spectacle Sanskrit Drama Noh Drama early Medieval religious and secular theatre Italian commedia dellarte Renaissance and Baroque pageantry and the English Restoration. The approach will be a documentary one. Students will read specific play texts in conjunction with primary evidence both textural and pictorial using both to illuminate the creation and history of theatre. Corequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350 General Education Fine arts and music Alternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 3

Survey of post-Restoration theatrical culture history and production forms. Though it is a continuation of the World Theatre History I the student need not have taken the previous course. Students will begin examining theatrical history and expression in Turkey China and Japan and move across the European continent focusing on the rise of European modernity. Students will cover Romantic theatre and opera melodrama and poetic spectacle Realism Naturalism and the independent theatre movement as well as the innovation of early 20th century theatrical practitioners. The approach will be a documentary one. Students will read specific play texts in conjunction with primary evidence textural and pictorial using both to illuminate the creation and history of theatre. Corequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350 and ENG 110 General Education Fine arts & music Alternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 3

Acting provides the student with an organized and practical approach to acting. A systematic approach to acting through a thorough examination and application of Konstantin Stanislavskis system of acting with in depth attention to the technique of the actor and their use of body and voice. Textual analysis scene work monologues auditioning performance pieces and various training exercises will be used. No theatre experience is necessary. Corequisite
Taught in the style of a seminar a small group of students learn thinking skills through discussion debate peer review and brainstorming. Context varies from section to section. Incoming students rank topic preferences and then are assigned to a section. Focuses specifically on two key areas of personal development (1) intellectual growth is stimulated through systematic critical questioning and (2) a sense of community involvement and responsibility is developed through classroom group work collaborative learning and a class community engagement project. The course also contains success skill exercises and college orientation information including an introduction to the portfolio program. General education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
or
An introduction to the academic community of Bridgewater College to the liberal arts and to the skills of critical thinking and reflective writing specifically designed for transfer students. Transfer students will explore the unique challenges of integrating into a liberal arts educational environment and will begin the process of documenting their experiences and growth in the four dimensions of personal development intellectual growth and discovery citizenship and community responsibility ethical and spiritual growth and emotional maturation and physical health. general education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
Alternate years offered 2017-2018 FILA fine arts & music (effective 2016-17)

Unit(s): 3

Designed to introduce the student to the basic fundamentals of directing plays for the stage. Students will carefully examine play structure and analysis communication with the actor and designer and rehearsal process and performance. Students will explore the work of the director through laboratory exercise and short performance piece where students cast and direct their own scenes. Examining the techniques of many of the most influential 20th century stage directors students will work towards a technique that the student can call hisher own. Practical work will be combined with written analysis in addition to the final short student-director production. Corequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350 General education fine arts & music Alternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 3

THEA/
Examination of theatrical literature and forms from the late 19th century well-made plays Realism Expressionism Futurism and Symbolism to Epic theatre and the Theatre of the Absurd. Playwrights such as Henrik Ibsen Bernard Shaw Anton Chekhov Eugene ONeill Bertolt Brecht Samuel Beckett and others will be studied. The goals of this course are for students to gain an understanding of the scope history techniques and influence of Modern Drama. Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 and ENG 110 General Education Literature & Writing Intensive Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 3

-or-
THEA/
Contemporary theatrical forms of American and British drama. Begins with post-World War II dramatic works and moves sequentially to the present day. Areas of attention include the angry young men metadrama gender race and ethnicity the new brutalism and contemporary docudrama. Particular focus on how play texts engage with the cultural and historical moment of their creation. Students gain an understanding of the scope history techniques and influence of contemporary drama. Playwrights such as John Osborne Edward Albee Eduard Bond Jose Rivera Martin McDonagh Tony Kushner Sarah Kane Suzan Lori-Parks Nilo Cruz Moises Kaufman Sarah Ruhl and others are studied. Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 and ENG 110 General Education Literature & Writing Intensive Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 3