Health and Human Sciences | College Catalog

Undergraduate Programs

Majors

Athletic Training
Family and Consumer Sciences
Health and Exercise Science
Health and Physical Education
Nutritional Science

Minors

Coaching

Concentrations

Child Development
Family Life Education
Gerontology
Nutritional Science

Pre-Professional Programs

Occupational Therapy
Physical Therapy
Physician Assistant

Graduate Programs

Master of Science in Athletic Training

The Department of Health and Human Sciences teams experienced faculty, challenging coursework and relevant experiential learning to prepare students for the needs of today’s employers and graduate schools. Students within this department will have rich opportunities that foster innovation, creativity and risk‑taking while being challenged to explore scientific foundations and practical applications within each discipline. Whether a student prefers to enter the job force or move on to graduate school after their bachelor’s degree is complete, the Department of Health and Human Sciences has programs that enhance success in the varied fast‑paced and ever‑changing disciplines of athletic training, family and consumer sciences, health and exercise science, health and physical education, nutrition and coaching.

The dynamic curricula empower students to address issues affecting individuals, families and communities. Graduates of our programs have demonstrated success in professions such as childhood, adolescent and adult education; state cooperative extension programs; school administration; law enforcement; pharmaceutical sales; medicine; chiropractic; nutrition and dietetics; nursing; physician assistant; paramedic; prosthetics; athletic training; massage therapy; occupational therapy; physical therapy; coaching; recreation; fitness; and varied human services careers.

In addition to departmental major and minor course offerings, students across the campus are invited to explore interests in physical activity and wellness. Instruction in activities that develop new physical skills are designed to translate into lifetime activity and healthy living.

Master of Science in Athletic Training

Consists of 63 credit hours from the following courses:

In-depth exploration of the structure andfunction of the skeletal and muscular systems ofthe body. An emphasis is placed on theinterrelated functions of these systems withother body systems and the impact that age and avariety of pathologies have on them.

Unit(s): 3

In-depth exploration of the structure andfunction of the cardiovascular respiratoryneurological and urinary systems of the body. Anemphasis is placed on the interrelated functionsof these systems with other body systems and theimpact that age and a variety of pathologies haveon them.

Unit(s): 3

Introduces the foundational principles of theathletic training profession. Topics such asinjuryillness prevention scope of practiceconcepts of patient care healthcare ethicslegal considerations and pre-participationexaminations will be investigated.

Unit(s): 1

Concepts and techniques in the application ofathletictherapeutic taping and wrapping for theappendicular and axial musculoskeletal system.Includes athletic protective equipment fittingguidelines and skill development.

Unit(s): 1

Preparation in patient musculoskeletal andneurovascular examination for the clinicaldiagnosis of athletic and non-athleticinjuriesconditions of the upper and lowerextremities. Includes the development of clinicalreasoning skills treatment interventionsreferral actions and return to activity decisions.

Unit(s): 4

Preparation in patient musculoskeletal andneurovascular examination for the clinicaldiagnosis of athletic and non-athleticinjuriesconditions of the head face neckspine thorax and abdominal regions of the body.Includes the development of clinical reasoningskills treatment interventions referral actionsand return-to-activity decisions.

Unit(s): 4

Foundational course in the theoretical conceptsclinical applications and physiological effectsof therapeutic modalities exercise andrehabilitation. Topics such asthermalacousticelectrical agents and thefoundations of therapeuticexerciserehabilitation design and implementationare examined. An emphasis is placed on patientassessment clinical decision making in designand progression patientclinician-orientedoutcomes and equipment safety and maintenance.

Unit(s): 4

Introduces manual therapy techniques functionalrehabilitation and return-to-activity assessment.Manual therapy techniques such as jointmobilizations instrument-assisted soft tissuemobilization strain counter strain and massageare examined. An emphasis is placed on patientassessment clinical decision making in designand progression patientclinician-orientedoutcomes and equipment safety and maintenance.

Unit(s): 4

Assessment of the professional knowledge of theathletic training student based on theircoursework in the Summer I term. This includesassessing the students competency andproficiency in athletic training professionalknowledge clinical skills and behaviors.

Unit(s): 1

Assessment of the professional knowledge of theathletic training student based on theircoursework in the Fall I term. This includesassessing the students competency andproficiency in athletic training professionalknowledge clinical skills and behaviors.

Unit(s): 1

Clinical education experience within theprofession of athletic training. This clinicalexperience allows the opportunity for theathletic training student to apply theirprofessional knowledge skills and behaviorsunder the direct supervision of a clinicalpreceptor within an athletic setting during atraditional athletic preseason. Students mustcomplete a minimum of 100 hours but no more than120 hours during this clinical experience. Thisclinical experience may require travel tooff-campus clinical sites.

Unit(s): 1

Clinical education experience within theprofession of athletic training. This clinicalexperience allows the opportunity for theathletic training student to apply theirprofessional knowledge skills and behaviorsunder the direct supervision of a clinicalpreceptor within an orthopedic setting. Studentsmust complete a minimum of 200 hours but no morethan 240 hours during this clinical experience.This clinical experience may require travel tooff-campus clinical sites.

Unit(s): 2

Clinical education experience within theprofession of athletic training. This clinicalexperience allows the opportunity for theathletic training student to apply theirprofessional knowledge skills and behaviorsunder the direct supervision of a clinicalpreceptor within an orthopedic setting. Studentsmust complete a minimum of 100 hours but no morethan 120 hours during this clinical experience.This clinical experience may require travel tooff-campus clinical sites.

Unit(s): 1

First of two seminar courses integrating avariety of concepts within the athletic trainingfield. This course includes a focus on exercisefitness nutrition and pharmacology. This courseincorporates a number of speaking engagementsfrom professionals in a variety of health carefields. Some of the course requirements areconducted outside of scheduled course meetingtimes and may require travel to off-campus sites.

Unit(s): 3

Planning identification and management ofemergent athletic and non-athleticinjuriesconditions. Emphasis on clinicaldecision-making for emergency interventionreferral and return-to-activity. Emergentintervention skills such as splinting spineboarding ambulatory aids and basic life supportskills will be developed.

Unit(s): 3

Concepts and techniques in the fabrication andapplication of custom protective equipmentsplints and orthotics. Includes the foundationalconcepts and fitting of orthopedic braces andother custom orthopedic devices.

Unit(s): 1

Preparation in patient examination for theclinical diagnosis of general medical illnessesand conditions for body systems such as thecardiovascular pulmonary endocrinegastrointestinal genitourinary neurological andintegumentary. Includes the development ofclinical reasoning skills treatmentinterventions referral actions andreturn-to-activity decisions.

Unit(s): 2

Examines the health promotion roles and functionsof the athletic trainer within the healthcarecommunity. An emphasis is placed on theoreticalfoundations needs assessment interventionstrategies and program planning for healthrisks injuries conditions and illnesses.

Unit(s): 3

Assessment of the professional knowledge of theathletic training student based on theircoursework in the Spring semester. This includesassessing the students competency andproficiency in athletic training professionalknowledge clinical skills and behaviors.

Unit(s): 1

Assessment of the professional knowledge of theathletic training student based on theircoursework in the Summer II term. This includesassessing the students competency andproficiency in athletic training professionalknowledge clinical skills and behaviors.

Unit(s): 1

Assessment of the professional knowledge of theathletic training student based on theircoursework in the Fall II term. This includesassessing the students competency andproficiency in athletic training professionalknowledge clinical skills and behaviors.

Unit(s): 1

Clinical education experience within theprofession of athletic training. This clinicalexperience allows the opportunity for theathletic training student to apply their generalmedical professional knowledge skills andbehaviors under the direct supervision of aclinical preceptor within a general medicalsetting. Students must complete a minimum of 50hours but no more than 60 hours during thisclinical experience. This clinical experience mayrequire travel to off-campus clinical sites.

Unit(s): 1

The second clinical education immersion withinthe profession of athletic training. Thisclinical immersion allows the opportunity for theathletic training student to apply theirprofessional knowledge skills and behaviorsunder the direct supervision of a clinicalpreceptor within an orthopedic setting and gainexperience in the daily operating functions of aclinical facility. Students must complete aminimum of 500 hours but no more than 700 hoursduring this clinical immersion. This clinicalimmersion may require travel to off-campusclinical sites.

Unit(s): 5

The second clinical education immersion withinthe profession of athletic training. Thisclinical immersion allows the opportunity for theathletic training student to apply theirprofessional knowledge skills and behaviorsunder the direct supervision of a clinicalpreceptor within an orthopedic setting and gainexperience in the daily operating functions of aclinical facility. Students must complete aminimum of 500 hours but no more than 700 hoursduring this clinical immersion. This clinicalimmersion may require travel to off-campusclinical sites.

Unit(s): 5

AT-660
Concepts of administration such as devising policy and procedures record-keeping budgeting facility design risk management and productivity standards for healthcare professionals.

Unit(s): 3

Examination of the mental health benefits of exercise as well as motivational factors involved in exercise and the many variables that influence exercise behavior (e.g. stress emotional states anxiety and depression). Additionally this course explores the psychological antecedents and consequences of injury and illness.

Unit(s): 3

This program is for individuals looking to prepare for a career in the healthcare profession of athletic training. Working collaboratively with physicians and other healthcare providers, athletic trainers engage in preventative services, emergency care, clinical diagnosis, therapeutic intervention and rehabilitation of injuries and medical conditions. Earning a degree from a Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) accredited program is the way a student becomes eligible for credentialing by the Board of Certification (BOC) as an athletic trainer.

The MSAT Program is fully accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) and the first school in Virginia to successfully secure CAATE accreditation at the master’s level via the substantive change process.

Athletic Training Major

Advising template undergraduate Athletic Training

Consists of 56 credit hours in the following courses:

Exploration of basic nutritional requirements for active individuals and the relationship of proper nutrition to increased health and human performance. Topics include how nutrients (e.g. carbohydrates proteins) can influence exercise performance appropriate ways to manage weight and evaluation of the role of ergogenic aids in human performance.

Unit(s): 3
 
Survey course in athletic training. Introduces the student to prevention of injuries emergency care general medical conditions and administration.

Unit(s): 3

Introduces the student to risk factors prevention etiology (anatomical biomechanical and physiological mechanisms) recognition and treatment of recreational and competitive sports injuries. Prerequisites ES 250 ES 320 and BIOL 305

Unit(s): 3

Introduces the newly admitted athletic training student to the competencies and proficiencies related to the field of athletic training. This clinical affiliation may require travel to off-campus clinical sites. Prerequisites ES 250 and admission to the Athletic Training Educational Program

Unit(s): 1

Examination of general medical conditions of all body systems including causes of pathogen-related illnesses chronic diseases and other acute illnesses. The application of basic human anatomy is required for common medical condition screening assessment referral and treatment. Prerequisites BIOL 305

Unit(s): 3

Examination of the function of the human musculoskeletal system. Selected musculoskeletal structures and their functions as well as analysis of movements as they relate to physical activity exercise and sport. Prerequisites BIOL 305 or ES 318

Unit(s): 3

Basic physiological concepts of the nervous muscular and energy systems including the effect of exercise on such functions as circulation respiration and temperature regulation. Prerequisites BIOL 305 or ES 318

Unit(s): 3

Examination of systemic evaluation techniques for injuries. The ability to recount analyze and demonstrate an accurate systemic evaluation suggest a physical dysfunction based on the analysis of the evaluation findings and plan a treatment approach based on the assessment is required for course completion. Prerequisites ES 251 and BIOL 314 or permission of instructor

Unit(s): 4

Assessment of the competencies and proficiencies related to the evaluation and care of lower extremity injuries and illnesses. This clinical affiliation may require travel to off-campus clinical sites. Prerequisites Satisfactory grade in ES 252

Unit(s): 1

Assessment of the competencies and proficiencies related to the evaluation and care of upper extremity injuries and illnesses. This clinical affiliation may require travel to off-campus clinical sites. Prerequisites Satisfactory grade in ES 352

Unit(s): 1

Examination of the theoretical bases of treatment goals appropriate therapeutic modality selection application and assessment of the treatment response that is required for the successful integration of therapeutic modalities into the athletic training practice. Identification of theoretical foundations (physiology physics and safety) for appropriate decision-making in the selection of the appropriate therapeutic modality including appropriate psychomotor skills for pre-treatment assessment treatment set-up modality application and assessment of treatment response and appropriate documentation. Prerequisites ES 351 or permission of instructor

Unit(s): 4

Development of rehabilitation programs for individuals recovering from injury. Upon identification of theoretical and practical approach for the design of rehabilitation protocols and the use of available rehabilitation equipment including specific parameters for providing exercise and rehabilitation recommendations for people encountering special disease illness or injury states. Prerequisites ES 351 or permission of instructor

Unit(s): 4

Examination of advanced evaluation skills enabling professionals to critically analyze injuries and their ensuing treatments. Prerequisites ES 351

Unit(s): 3

Assessment of the competencies and proficiencies related to the application and care of protective medical devices and athletic equipment. This clinical affiliation may require travel to off-campus clinical sites. Prerequisites Satisfactory grade in ES 353

Unit(s): 1

Assessment of the competencies and proficiencies related to the evaluation and care of general medical conditions. This clinical affiliation may require travel to off-campus clinical sites. Prerequisites Satisfactory grade in ES 451

Unit(s): 1

Introduction to the concepts of pharmacology and counseling as related to healthcare. Prerequisites ES 450

Unit(s): 3

Concepts of administration such as devising policy and procedures record-keeping budgeting facility design risk management and productivity standards for healthcare professionals.

Unit(s): 3

Introduction to the biological sciences covering biological chemistry celltissue structure and function genetics and microevolution. Intended for biology health and human sciences and environmental science majors. Three lectures and one lab per week. Corequisites
Real numbers exponents radicals and algebraic operations with polynomial and rational functions. Solving equations and graphing expressions involving polynomial and rational functions and exponential and logarithmic functions. Credit may not be received for both MATH 118 and 110. General education master core skill 2016 Summer Session I offered as an online course

Unit(s): 3
or
This course is designed to provide development of basic computational skills and introductory algebra concepts like solutions of single variable equations. It will also cover some introductory statistics and probability concepts. Problem solving will be emphasized. The course will contain at least one project that requires students to make extensive use of spreadsheet software like Excel. General Education Master Core Skill

Unit(s): 3
Biology and environmental science majors should take
Real numbers exponents radicals and algebraic operations with polynomial and rational functions. Solving equations and graphing expressions involving polynomial and rational functions and exponential and logarithmic functions. Credit may not be received for both MATH 118 and 110. General education master core skill 2016 Summer Session I offered as an online course

Unit(s): 3
. Other students should consult with their advisor about which course to take. General Education natural and physical sciences

Unit(s): 4

Introduction to the structure and function of the human body examining the skeletal muscular circulatory nervous digestive respiratory urinary and reproductive systems. Lecture focuses on topics of physiologyfunction histology and their relation to anatomical structure while the lab focuses on descriptive anatomy. Three lectures and one lab per week. Prerequisites BIOL 110 or permission of instructor 2016 Summer Session I Begins 5-23-16

Unit(s): 4

Introduction to the physiology of the human body including the physiology of enzymes and membranes tissue physiology (nervous muscular) and a detailed survey of the physiology of the major organ systems. Three lectures and one lab per week. Prerequisites BIOL 111 or BIOL 110 and 305 Credit may not be received for both BIOL 311 and 314

Unit(s): 4

For individuals looking to prepare for an allied health career in athletic training. In addition, the major provides an added avenue for students interested in pursuing graduate studies in physical therapy or occupational therapy.

Students are required to maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 and complete the application process to the department of health and human sciences (January 15 is the deadline). Additionally, students must complete their clinical experience under the supervision of a preceptor and successfully complete the Clinical Competencies and Proficiences and the five clinical affiliations.

NOTE: Bridgewater College will stop admitting students into the bachelor of science in athletic training program after the 2016-17 academic year. Any student wishing to pursue an undergraduate athletic training degree must be admitted to BC during the 2016-17 academic year. After 2016-17, BC will be only admitting students into the master of science in athletic training program.

Admissions Standards

Admission to the athletic training major is regardless of sex, race, color, national or ethnic origin or disability. Only applicants who have met the minimum requirements established below will be considered for a position. The admission process will be competitive for limited positions. Admission packets may be requested from the director of the athletic training program.

  • Understand and sign the Technical Standards Form for the athletic training program.
  • A complete application—submitted before January 15 of the application year.
  • Three letters of reference—stipulating academic and leadership potential and overall character of the applicant—from the faculty at Bridgewater College.
  • Completion of a minimum of 200 “pre-placement” hours with intercollegiate athletics at Bridgewater College. These hours are used to familiarize the student with the athletic training profession and the practical requirements of the program.
  • Successful academic performance resulting in a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5.
  • Successful completion of ES 250, ES 249 and BIOL 305 (final grade of C or above).
  • Self-direction essay (500 words or more).
  • All students meeting established minimum requirements will be interviewed by the Curriculum Admission Committee.

The Curriculum Admission Committee will interview and rank candidates based on objective criteria. Admission will not exceed a ratio of more than eight students per licensed athletic trainer. Letters of admission will be sent to applicants prior to February 1.

Technical Standards Information

The Athletic Training Program at Bridgewater College is a rigorous and intense program that places specific requirements and demands on the students enrolled in the program. An objective of this program is to prepare graduates to enter a variety of employment settings and to render care to a wide spectrum of individuals engaged in physical activity. The technical standards set forth by the Athletic Training Program establish the essential qualities considered necessary for students admitted to this program to achieve the knowledge, skills and competencies of an entry-level athletic trainer, as well as meet the expectations of the program’s accrediting agency (Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education [CAATE]). The following abilities and expectations must be met by all students admitted to the Athletic Training Program. In the event a student is unable to fulfill these technical standards, with or without reasonable accommodation, the student will not be admitted into the program.

Compliance with the program’s technical standards does not guarantee a student’s eligibility for the Board of Certification (BOC) exam.

Candidates for selection to the Athletic Training Program must demonstrate:

  1. The mental capacity to assimilate, analyze, synthesize, integrate concepts and problem solve to formulate assessment and therapeutic judgments and to be able to distinguish deviations from the norm.
  2. Sufficient postural and neuromuscular control, sensory function and coordination to perform appropriate physical examinations using accepted techniques; and accurately, safely and efficiently use equipment and materials during the assessment and treatment of patients.
  3. The ability to communicate effectively and sensitively with patients and colleagues, including individuals from different cultural and social backgrounds; this includes, but is not limited to, the ability to establish rapport with patients and communicate judgments and treatment information effectively. Students must be able to understand and speak the English language at a level consistent with competent professional behavior.
  4. The ability to record the physical examination results and a treatment plan clearly and accurately.
  5. The capacity to maintain composure and continue to function well during periods of high stress.
  6. The perseverance, diligence and commitment to complete the athletic training education program as outlined and sequenced.
  7. Flexibility and the ability to adjust to changing situations and uncertainty in clinical situations.
  8. Affective skills and appropriate demeanor and rapport that relate to professional education and quality patient care.

Candidates for selection to the Athletic Training Program will be required to verify they understand and meet these technical standards or that they believe that, with certain accommodations, they will meet the standards.

The Bridgewater College director of academic support services will evaluate a student who states he or she could meet the program’s technical standards with accommodation and confirm that the stated condition qualifies as a disability under applicable laws.

If the student states he or she can meet the technical standards with accommodation, then the College will determine whether it agrees that the student can meet the technical standards with reasonable accommodation; this includes a review of whether the accommodations requested would jeopardize clinician/patient safety, or the educational process of the student or the institution, including all coursework, clinical experiences and internships deemed essential to graduation.

Transfer Students

A student who has attended another accredited college or university and is in good standing may apply for admission to Bridgewater College. One who has attended an accredited two-year college may transfer as many as 68 credits in courses comparable to those offered at Bridgewater College. Transfer students applying for admission to B.C. must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or above and be in good standing at the college they are attending. A transfer student applying for admission into the Bridgewater College Athletic Training Program must have a minimum of a 2.5 cumulative grade point average and must have completed the aforementioned admissions standards (Technical Standards Form, ES 249, ES 250, BIOL 305 observational hours, essay, application and interview). No student will be admitted into the program without successful completion of the pre-placement phase. Credentials collected for admission include all of those that are required for first-time entering students as well as a Dean’s Reference Form and an official transcript from each institution of higher learning attended since completion of the secondary program. Transcripts will be evaluated by the registrar on a course-by-course basis. Credit will be awarded only for those courses that a grade of C or above has been earned. The only course that may be transferred in within the athletic training major is BIOL 314. All other courses for this major must be taken at Bridgewater College. Other general education requirements may be transferred based on the above criteria.

Graduation Requirements

  1. Complete a minimum of 123 credit hours with a minimum of 48 credit hours chosen from junior and senior-level courses.
  2. Complete general education requirements for the respective degree.
  3. Complete course requirements for the major.
  4. Earn a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 and a minimum GPA of 2.0 in courses required for the major.
  5. Complete a minimum of 33 credit hours with 30 of the last 33 credit hours of academic work in residence at Bridgewater College or at a College-approved study abroad program. In addition, complete at least 9 credit hours of the major at Bridgewater College.

Following successful completion of this program, a student will be eligible to sit for the Board of Certification (BOC) exam.

Additional Requirements for Athletic Training

  • There are additional requirements for program progression and retention identified in the Athletic Training Program Student Manual. Please contact the department of health and human sciences for a copy of this manual.
  • All students admitted to the professional phase of the program are required to attend pre-season training as early as August 1 each year.
  • Students admitted to the professional phase of the program may be required to complete their clinical affiliations during normal college breaks, e.g. spring break and holidays.
  • Additional fees for the program are announced in the athletic training student handbook and may include things such as the cost for class books, laboratories, clinical affiliations, criminal background check, medical examinations, CPR/AED/First Aid certification and clinical uniforms.
  • Students admitted to the professional phase of the program and enrolled in clinical affiliation courses may need to travel to off-site locations for their clinical experience.

Family and Consumer Sciences Major

Advising Templates

Students must complete 21 credits of core courses and 18 credits from one of the two tracks (Human Development and Family Studies or Family and Consumer Sciences Education). Consists of 39 credit hours distributed as follows:

Core Courses (21 credits)

An introduction to the history of Family and Consumer Sciences with consideration of family strengths and weaknesses and internal dynamics of families. Emphasis placed on knowledge of the use of critical science and creative skills to address problems in diverse family community and work environments. Exploration of the field of Family and Consumer Sciences career planning and knowledge of occupational skill development.

Unit(s): 3

Students will examine family and interpersonal relationships from a variety of theoretical and conceptual frameworks to gain understanding of the changes in society relative to marriage and family. Students will engage in critical examination of issues related to families work and their interrelationships. Emphasis placed upon the reciprocal impacts of relationships within the family and a persons relationships to individuals and other institutions such as educational governmental religious and occupational institutions in society.

Unit(s): 3

Examine issues related to physical cognitive and socio-emotional development of the child from conception through early adolescence. Students will develop theoretical and practical knowledge of child development concepts. Provisions are made for observing and working with preschool children. Prerequisite junior standing

Unit(s): 4

Developmental changes of individuals in families throughout the adolescent years into emerging adulthood. Emphasis placed on knowledge of physical emotional cognitive and social aspects of development.

Unit(s): 3

Overview of the process of parenting in diverse cultural and familial structures. Exploration of issues related to parenting at various stages of development as well as formation of parenting goals and styles. Emphasis placed on parent-child interactions through the child rearing years. Provides an emphasis on evidence-based practices and evaluation of programming. Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 Experiential learning

Unit(s): 3

Examines issues related to management process and its significance on the quality of life experienced by families with consideration of values goals standards decision making and allocation of resources. Topics include development and allocation of resources social environment influences life cycle and family structure influences and consumer issues and decisions. Prerequisite Junior or senior standing

Unit(s): 3

This capstone course explores special topics in all family and consumer content areas. Special topics and problems are developed according to the individuals specialization and professional interests. Students synthesize research in a particular area of family and consumer sciences to complete a capstone research project.

Unit(s): 2

Track 1-Human Development and Family Studies (18 credits)

Introduction to research process including formulating research questions research methods general statistical evaluation presentation and research ethics. MATH 140 recommended but not required.

Unit(s): 3
 
Examine issues related to geriatrics with emphasis on issues including historical cultural biological physiological psychological and social contexts. Opportunities for experiential learning in residential and intermediate facilities with appropriate agencies. Prequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350 Experiential learning

Unit(s): 3

Students will develop an understanding of the legal issues policies and law influencing the well-being of families. Topics include family and the law relating to marriage divorce family support child custody child protection and rights family planning social services education the economy religion and public policy as it affects the family including tax civil rights social security economic support laws and regulations.

Unit(s): 3

Critical examination of principles of the general philosophy and broad principles of family life education in conjunction with the ability to plan implement and evaluate such educational programs. An understanding of the character and quality of human social conduct and the ability to critically examine ethical questions and issues as they relate to professional practice and community concerns and values.

Unit(s): 3

The nature of racial relations and inequalities in American society including their historical origins and relationship to Western capitalist development. The ethnic composition of contemporary American society impact of legal and illegal immigration patterns dynamics of modern structures and institutions the Civil Rights Movement inter-ethnic conflicts and attitudes multiculturalism and status of affirmative action are analyzed in the context of national and global social change. Prerequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350 and SOC 101 General education global dynamics

Unit(s): 3

-or-
Introduction to the theory and practice of cultural studies engaging with major themes and scholarly research in the interdisciplinary field. A critical perspective on mass media and popular culture is emphasized. Topics include ideology neoliberalism recursivity patriarchy racism and celebrity fetishism. Prerequisite PDP 150 or 350

Unit(s): 3

-or-
Theoretical and practical survey of intercultural communication processes. Examines intrapersonal interpersonal organizational and mass media dimensions of intercultural communication. The course specifically focuses on the distinctive cultural behaviors expectations values and power dynamics that affect our abilities to communicate effectively and people from diverse cultures. Prerequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350 General Education global dynamics Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 3

One additional FCS course based on career goals

Track 2-Family and Consumer Sciences Education (18 credits) 

Basic nutrition concepts nutrition needs throughout the life cycle and current nutrition issues.

Unit(s): 3

Investigation of the scientific principles involved in basic cookery with emphasis on quality characteristics and product evaluation. Structure composition and nutritive value of foods are studied as well as food selection storage preparation processing and meal management techniques. Food safety and an ecological approach to food selection and preparation is emphasized. Instruction requires two class meetings per week and one three-hour lab.

Unit(s): 3

Examine the management of the decision-making processes related to housing furnishings and equipment for individuals and families with attention given to special needs and the diversity of individuals.

Unit(s): 3

Emphasis on factors influencing fashion including the sociological psychological and physiological aspects of clothing and basic construction of clothing.

Unit(s): 3

Instructional practice management and evaluation appropriate for the secondary Family and Consumer Sciences classroom. Laws governing vocational education its management and guidance and its relationship to state and national programs is considered. Emphasis on organizing and implementing a FCCLA program into classroom instruction. Alternate years offered 2015-2016

Unit(s): 3

Principles of economic systems in relation to standards in selection of goods and services and sources of reliable consumer information. Prerequisite ECON 200 or ECON 210 or permission of instructor

Unit(s): 3

For students wishing to pursue Teacher Education endorsement, admission to the Teacher Education Program (TEP) is required. The following TEP requirements apply:

Secondary (6-12) Education Licensure 
Education course requirements for teacher candidates must be completed (EDUC 140, 200, 215, 201, 334, 302, 370, 303, 450, 380X, 412 and 470 in 6-12 classroom).

Must complete Praxis II in Family and Consumer Sciences content area.

Health and Exercise Science Major

Advising Templates

Consists of 48 credit hours in the following courses:

Introduction to the biological sciences covering biological chemistry celltissue structure and function genetics and microevolution. Intended for biology health and human sciences and environmental science majors. Three lectures and one lab per week. Corequisites
Real numbers exponents radicals and algebraic operations with polynomial and rational functions. Solving equations and graphing expressions involving polynomial and rational functions and exponential and logarithmic functions. Credit may not be received for both MATH 118 and 110. General education master core skill 2016 Summer Session I offered as an online course

Unit(s): 3
or
This course is designed to provide development of basic computational skills and introductory algebra concepts like solutions of single variable equations. It will also cover some introductory statistics and probability concepts. Problem solving will be emphasized. The course will contain at least one project that requires students to make extensive use of spreadsheet software like Excel. General Education Master Core Skill

Unit(s): 3
Biology and environmental science majors should take
Real numbers exponents radicals and algebraic operations with polynomial and rational functions. Solving equations and graphing expressions involving polynomial and rational functions and exponential and logarithmic functions. Credit may not be received for both MATH 118 and 110. General education master core skill 2016 Summer Session I offered as an online course

Unit(s): 3
. Other students should consult with their advisor about which course to take. General Education natural and physical sciences

Unit(s): 4

Exploration of contemporary issues in the field of health and exercise science including exposure to a variety of career opportunities some of which include athletic training exercise physiology fitness physical therapy occupational therapy and recreation.

Unit(s): 3

Exploration of basic nutritional requirements for active individuals and the relationship of proper nutrition to increased health and human performance. Topics include how nutrients (e.g. carbohydrates proteins) can influence exercise performance appropriate ways to manage weight and evaluation of the role of ergogenic aids in human performance.

Unit(s): 3

Introduction to the structure and function of the human body examining the skeletal muscular circulatory nervous digestive respiratory urinary and reproductive systems. Lecture focuses on topics of physiologyfunction histology and their relation to anatomical structure while the lab focuses on descriptive anatomy. Three lectures and one lab per week. Prerequisites BIOL 110 or permission of instructor 2016 Summer Session I Begins 5-23-16

Unit(s): 4

Introduction to the physiology of the human body including the physiology of enzymes and membranes tissue physiology (nervous muscular) and a detailed survey of the physiology of the major organ systems. Three lectures and one lab per week. Prerequisites BIOL 111 or BIOL 110 and 305 Credit may not be received for both BIOL 311 and 314

Unit(s): 4

Examination of the function of the human musculoskeletal system. Selected musculoskeletal structures and their functions as well as analysis of movements as they relate to physical activity exercise and sport. Prerequisites BIOL 305 or ES 318

Unit(s): 3

Examination of the multiple determinants of health and wellness from a personal and community perspective. Through service-based learning experiences students critically analyze individual social and environmental factors that influence health. This course requires students to spend time off-campus serving at community agencies in order to successfully fulfill course requirements. Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 ENG 110 and ES-230 or permission of the instructor Experiential learning and writing intensive

Unit(s): 3

Basic physiological concepts of the nervous muscular and energy systems including the effect of exercise on such functions as circulation respiration and temperature regulation. Prerequisites BIOL 305 or ES 318

Unit(s): 3

Concepts of administration such as devising policy and procedures record-keeping budgeting facility design risk management and productivity standards for healthcare professionals.

Unit(s): 3

-or-
Capstone experience integrating the core learned in major level courses through readings class discussions and projects. Additionally skill application occurs by completing 75 hours of competency-based work in an environment relevant to the discipline and reflecting upon this experience in light of their knowledge and skill development. Prerequisites senior Health and Exercise Science majors or permission of instructor

Unit(s): 3

Introduction to the role psychology plays in physical education and sport settings. Exploration of how psychological factors (e.g. personality achievement motivation anxiety) can influence participation in physical activity and motor performance how the structure of sport and physical education programs influence psychological development and how teaching mental skills (e.g. arousal regulation goal setting visualization) may enhance motor performance in physical education and sport. Prerequisites
Taught in the style of a seminar a small group of students learn thinking skills through discussion debate peer review and brainstorming. Context varies from section to section. Incoming students rank topic preferences and then are assigned to a section. Focuses specifically on two key areas of personal development (1) intellectual growth is stimulated through systematic critical questioning and (2) a sense of community involvement and responsibility is developed through classroom group work collaborative learning and a class community engagement project. The course also contains success skill exercises and college orientation information including an introduction to the portfolio program. General education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
or
An introduction to the academic community of Bridgewater College to the liberal arts and to the skills of critical thinking and reflective writing specifically designed for transfer students. Transfer students will explore the unique challenges of integrating into a liberal arts educational environment and will begin the process of documenting their experiences and growth in the four dimensions of personal development intellectual growth and discovery citizenship and community responsibility ethical and spiritual growth and emotional maturation and physical health. general education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
ENG 110 Writing intensive

Unit(s): 3

-or-
Examination of the mental health benefits of exercise as well as motivational factors involved in exercise and the many variables that influence exercise behavior (e.g. stress emotional states anxiety and depression). Additionally this course explores the psychological antecedents and consequences of injury and illness.

Unit(s): 3

Capstone experience integrating the core learned in major level courses through readings class discussions and projects. Additionally skill application occurs by completing 75 hours of competency-based work in an environment relevant to the discipline and reflecting upon this experience in light of their knowledge and skill development. Prerequisites senior Health and Exercise Science majors or permission of instructor

Unit(s): 3

And 12 additional credit hours from the following courses:

Expands on several topics introduced in BIOL 305. Lecture explores how clinical tests and drug therapies are used to evaluate medical conditions associated with the cardiovascular respiratory urinary and nervous systems while the lab provides students with a more in-depth examination of skeletal and muscular anatomy. Prerequisite BIOL 305

Unit(s): 3

Introduces a variety of business principles and practices as a foundation for students majoring in Business Administration and for non-business majors interested in acquiring basic understanding of the business world. Addresses aspects of leadership and personal assessment and development through a semester-long business plan project helping students to assess their interest in and aptitude for various business disciplines.

Unit(s): 3

Explores the principles and practices of how goods services and ideas are developed and distributed in order to satisfy individual and organization needs wants and objectives. Emphasis is placed on the micro-marketing perspectives including product price promotion and place. Prerequisites BUS 120 and COMM 100 or permission of instructor ECON 210 recommended but not required

Unit(s): 3

Overview of the functional groups and reactivity of organic molecules using biological examples. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour lab per week. Prerequisites CHEM 125 or 162 Credit may not be received for both CHEM 250 and 305

Unit(s): 4

Examines the role of news advocacy scientific analysis decision and policy making risk perception and other factors in the communication of issues related to science environment and health. Provides students with rich theoretical background critical understanding and practical skills to produce investigate and critique communication processes related to the topics. Students in this course are required to conduct field work and original research write and publish news and analytical articles. Alternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 3

Introduction to research process including formulating research questions research methods general statistical evaluation presentation and research ethics. MATH 140 recommended but not required.

Unit(s): 3

Fundamentals of administering first aid in all its aspects with attention to the prevention and treatment of athletic injuries. Emphasis on general safety procedures surrounding activities of school college and community environments. Estimated Extra Cost 2015 Interterm 125

Unit(s): 3

Practical experience in evaluation of physical fitness and its application to the implementation of safe and effective exercise training programs.

Unit(s): 3

Administration of school health and exercise science programs including health instruction environmental services and curriculum content. Methods and materials used in teaching health and exercise science as well as experiences in unit structure and application are covered. Prerequisites ES 300WX and EDUC 215

Unit(s): 3

Preparation in scientifically sound principles of conditioning in professional settings including in-depth study of strength training speed development cardiovascular training flexibility training and exercise program design. Principles and concepts derived from physiology psychology anatomy and kinesiology are practically applied. Application of principles of training to all populations including those with special needs and athletes. Prerequisites ES 320

Unit(s): 3

Examination of human movement from the perspectives of motor learning motor development and motor control. The basic psychological learning principles and theories apply to the acquisition of motor skills and factors which may influence skill learning are identified as is physical growth and development as related to motor performance across the lifespan.

Unit(s): 3

Examination of the theoretical bases of treatment goals appropriate therapeutic modality selection application and assessment of the treatment response that is required for the successful integration of therapeutic modalities into the athletic training practice. Identification of theoretical foundations (physiology physics and safety) for appropriate decision-making in the selection of the appropriate therapeutic modality including appropriate psychomotor skills for pre-treatment assessment treatment set-up modality application and assessment of treatment response and appropriate documentation. Prerequisites ES 351 or permission of instructor

Unit(s): 4

Development of rehabilitation programs for individuals recovering from injury. Upon identification of theoretical and practical approach for the design of rehabilitation protocols and the use of available rehabilitation equipment including specific parameters for providing exercise and rehabilitation recommendations for people encountering special disease illness or injury states. Prerequisites ES 351 or permission of instructor

Unit(s): 4

Examination of the field of Adapted Physical Education. Exposure to recreational needs and capabilities of people with disabilities is provided. Practical experience in working with the special populations as well as orientation to wheelchair sports. Off campus laboratory experience required.

Unit(s): 3

Development of community based intervention strategies to modify health risk behaviors with emphasis on theoretical foundations and comprehensive program planning strategies.

Unit(s): 3

This course is meant to be a practical application of the material covered in ES 427 Health Promotion and Wellness. Students who have previously completed ES 427 will then implement the health program they developed and do preliminary measurements on its effectiveness. These interventions strategies will be community-focused to achieve behavioral changes in at-risk populations. Prerequisites ES 427

Unit(s): 3

Upon approval of the Department and the Vice President and Dean of Academic Affairs a student with a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 or better may engage in an independent study or research project. One desiring to pursue independent study or research must submit a written description of the proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs by the first day of the semester in which the study is to be conducted. At the end of the semester the supervising professor files with the Registrar a grade for the student and a description of the work accomplished. Credit may be received for not more than three independent studies or research projects.

Unit(s): 3

-or-
An Honors Project is one in which a student researches a subject by examination of relevant literature or by experimentation or both the student reports the results in an accurately documented and well-written paper or appropriate representation of the work. Whenever the study deals with the subject of an established course the student is expected to go well beyond the usual work of the course in research and in assimilation of the results as revealed in the report. Juniors and seniors with a cumulative grade point average of 3.40 or above may register for an Honors Project. One desiring to pursue an Honors Project must submit a written description of his or her proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs by the first day of the semester in which the study is to be conducted. At the conclusion of the Honors Project the supervising professor files with the Registrar a grade for the student and a description of the work accomplished and with the Library Director a copy of the written paper or appropriate representation of the work. It is the students responsibility to provide the materials for the library in compliance with specifications approved by the Council on Education. The Library Director arranges for binding and storage.

Unit(s): 3

Basic nutrition concepts nutrition needs throughout the life cycle and current nutrition issues.

Unit(s): 3

Examine issues related to geriatrics with emphasis on issues including historical cultural biological physiological psychological and social contexts. Opportunities for experiential learning in residential and intermediate facilities with appropriate agencies. Prequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350 Experiential learning

Unit(s): 3

A study of the effects of nutrition on the well being of the athlete and the relationship of good nutrition to optimum performance. Prerequisite FCS 240

Unit(s): 3

Basic descriptive statistics probability hypothesis testing correlation and regression. Statistical computer software is used to analyze data. Prerequisites MATH 118 MATH 110 MATH 115 or satisfactory performance on placement test

Unit(s): 3

Pressing issues confronting professionals in a technological era. Utilizing the insights of philosophical and religious ethics the course examines the responsibilities of the professional person in business medicine law education the ministry and other fields. Problems considered include confidentiality accountability whistleblowing governmental regulation and ethical codes. Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 ENG 110 and junior or senior standing General Education philosophy or religion Ethical Reasoning Course

Unit(s): 3

-or-
Confronts a number of modern scientific and ethical problems including abortion genetic testing genetically modified plants and animals stem cells gene therapy research on humans and physician-assisted suicide. Biology and biotechnology often confound our notions of right and wrong and what ethical behavior is. Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 and ENG 110 General Education philosophy or religion and Ethical Reasoning Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 3

Empirical findings related to the description classification assessment etiology and treatments of various psychological disorders. Specific disorders examined include anxiety disorders mood disorders substance-related disorders personality disorders and schizophrenia. An important emphasis is understanding the impact of mental illness on individuals and their family and friends. Prerequisite PSY 101 or SOC 101 or permission of instructor

Unit(s): 3

Surveys historical approaches basic issues recent research and current theoretical perspectives in developmental psychology. Emphasis on describing and explaining the changes that characterize physical perceptual cognitive social and emotional development across the lifespan. Prerequisite PSY 101 or permission of instructor

Unit(s): 3

This major introduces students to the sub-disciplines of health and exercise science, providing students with a sound preparation upon which to develop a career or to pursue graduate study in the discipline.

Health and Physical Education Major

For the student pursuing a career in teaching health and/or physical education. Consists of 51 credit hours. Separate admission to the Teacher Education Program (TEP) is a requirement for anyone wishing to graduate with a major in health and physical education.

Advising template for Health and Physical Education

Consists of 51 credit hours in the following courses:

Survey exploration for freshman and sophomores interested in the Health and Physical Education major. Observational experiences in each level of physical education teaching. Concepts include philosophy of physical education behavior management establishing a positive learning environment advocacy and differentiating instruction. Two days each week in the classroom and three days each week in the field.

Unit(s): 3

Introduces students to the fundamental skills and concepts involved in team sports. Through a tactical games approach students will develop skill technique and tactical awareness to successfully participate in a variety of team sports including but not limited to basketball soccer and volleyball.

Unit(s): 3

Exploration of basic nutritional requirements for active individuals and the relationship of proper nutrition to increased health and human performance. Topics include how nutrients (e.g. carbohydrates proteins) can influence exercise performance appropriate ways to manage weight and evaluation of the role of ergogenic aids in human performance.

Unit(s): 3

This is a survey course which examines a variety of personal and community health and wellness topics. Students will gain the content knowledge and understanding of health topics and develop health literacy skills that will prepare them to teach school health aligned with the National Health Education Standards and the Virginia Standards of Learning.

Unit(s): 3

Performance and teaching techniques for gymnastics rhythms dance cooperative activities and outdoor education with a focus on pedagogical issues. Prerequisites ES 235 or permission of instructor

Unit(s): 3

Introduction to human structures and physiological systems which are fundamental to human activity. Systems covered include musculoskeletal respiratory cardiovascular and nervous with particular attention to the integration of function across systems. Students needing a laboratory-based course should take BIOL 305 Introduction to Human Anatomy and BIOL 314 Human Physiology as an alternative.

Unit(s): 3

Examination of the function of the human musculoskeletal system. Selected musculoskeletal structures and their functions as well as analysis of movements as they relate to physical activity exercise and sport. Prerequisites BIOL 305 or ES 318

Unit(s): 3

Basic physiological concepts of the nervous muscular and energy systems including the effect of exercise on such functions as circulation respiration and temperature regulation. Prerequisites BIOL 305 or ES 318

Unit(s): 3

Administration of school health and exercise science programs including health instruction environmental services and curriculum content. Methods and materials used in teaching health and exercise science as well as experiences in unit structure and application are covered. Prerequisites ES 300WX and EDUC 215

Unit(s): 3

Examination of human movement from the perspectives of motor learning motor development and motor control. The basic psychological learning principles and theories apply to the acquisition of motor skills and factors which may influence skill learning are identified as is physical growth and development as related to motor performance across the lifespan.

Unit(s): 3

Preparation for future health and physical education teachers to construct and identify various forms of authentic and traditional assessments in the secondary PE setting. Includes the use of technology to gather and record data enhance learning and enhance personal productivity in the physical activity setting. Prerequisites Admission to Teacher Education Program Corequisite ES 370

Unit(s): 3
*
Introduction to the role psychology plays in physical education and sport settings. Exploration of how psychological factors (e.g. personality achievement motivation anxiety) can influence participation in physical activity and motor performance how the structure of sport and physical education programs influence psychological development and how teaching mental skills (e.g. arousal regulation goal setting visualization) may enhance motor performance in physical education and sport. Prerequisites
Taught in the style of a seminar a small group of students learn thinking skills through discussion debate peer review and brainstorming. Context varies from section to section. Incoming students rank topic preferences and then are assigned to a section. Focuses specifically on two key areas of personal development (1) intellectual growth is stimulated through systematic critical questioning and (2) a sense of community involvement and responsibility is developed through classroom group work collaborative learning and a class community engagement project. The course also contains success skill exercises and college orientation information including an introduction to the portfolio program. General education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
or
An introduction to the academic community of Bridgewater College to the liberal arts and to the skills of critical thinking and reflective writing specifically designed for transfer students. Transfer students will explore the unique challenges of integrating into a liberal arts educational environment and will begin the process of documenting their experiences and growth in the four dimensions of personal development intellectual growth and discovery citizenship and community responsibility ethical and spiritual growth and emotional maturation and physical health. general education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
ENG 110 Writing intensive

Unit(s): 3

Preparation for the physical educator to teach lifetime physical activity at the secondary level. Curriculum development unit and lesson planning and effective instructional strategies and techniques will be explored and applied through peer teaching and practical field experience. Prerequisites EDUC 215 and ES 235

Unit(s): 3
*
Examination of the field of Adapted Physical Education. Exposure to recreational needs and capabilities of people with disabilities is provided. Practical experience in working with the special populations as well as orientation to wheelchair sports. Off campus laboratory experience required.

Unit(s): 3

Preparation for future health and physical education teachers to apply principles of class management assessment unit and lesson planning and instructional techniques as part of a developmentally appropriate elementary physical education program. Peer teaching a provides students with practical experience. Prerequisites EDUC 401

Unit(s): 3
*
Twenty-hour field experience in local schools and preschool program. Reports reflections and journal entries required. Students will gain experience in observations assessment and teaching in the PE setting. Prerequisites Admission to Teacher Education Program Corequisite ES 426

Unit(s): 1
*
Development of community based intervention strategies to modify health risk behaviors with emphasis on theoretical foundations and comprehensive program planning strategies.

Unit(s): 3

2015 Fall Semester Begins 8-26-15 First Ten Weeks

Unit(s): 1

2016 Spring Semester MW Begins 2-15-16 TR Begins 2-16-16 Last Ten Weeks

Unit(s): 1

2016 Fall Semester Begins 8-30-16 First Ten Weeks 2017 Spring Semester Begins 1-30-17 First Ten Weeks

Unit(s): 1

In addition to the major, the following courses are required for licensure/certification:

Helps candidates explore the career of teaching. Emphasis on the historical sociological and pedagogical foundations of American public education as well as culturally responsive pedagogy with academically culturally and linguistically diverse populations. Introduces InTASC standards and provides information about local state and national requirements of the teaching profession.

Unit(s): 3

Surveys principles of development learning and evaluation as they relate to learners educational growth. The study of the physical social emotional and intellectual development of the learner focuses on how this development relates to pedagogy motivation classroom management and assessment.

Unit(s): 3

Ten-hour field experience as an observer in an elementary middle or secondary school setting with an academically culturally or linguistically diverse student population. Corequisite EDUC 215

Unit(s): 1
*
Explores cultural linguistic and academic diversity with an introduction to multicultural education. Introduction to appropriate and effective strategies for instructing these diverse learners in inclusive classroom settings. Prerequisites minimum 2.5 GPA application to the TEP have taken Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educators Tests Mathematics have taken or registered for the Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA) Corequisites EDUC-201 and Sophomore standing.

Unit(s): 3
*
Twenty-hour field experience in a local school with a focus on literacy. Elementary placements include working with an emergent reader constructing lesson plans and exploring assessment methods. PreK-12 and Secondary placements focus on middle and high school literacy development within the candidates content area including vocabulary development literal interpretive critical and evaluative comprehension and critical thinking and writing strategies. Prerequisites admission to the TEP Corequisite EDUC 330 (Pre-K-6) or EDUC 334 (6-12 Pre-K-12)

Unit(s): 1
*
Twenty-hour field experience in a local school. Provides pre-service candidates with opportunities to apply theoretical knowledge of EDUC 370 in classroom settings. Reports reflections andor journal entries required as assigned. Candidates are expected to actively engage in teaching co-teaching or assist the classroom teacher. Section 1 is for elementary candidates and Section 2 is for secondary candidates. Prerequisites admission to the TEP Corequisite EDUC 370

Unit(s): 1
*
Helps secondary education candidates describe and develop effective content literacy strategies for academically culturally and linguistically diverse 6-12 students. Candidates use their content area curriculum to enhance literacy development including vocabulary development literal interpretive critical and evaluate comprehension critical thinking writing strategies listening and speaking skills are also addressed. Prerequisites admission to the Teacher Education Program and junior standing Corequisites Section 2 of EDUC 302

Unit(s): 2
*
Effective and efficient management of time space and resources including lessons and classroom behaviors are examined as a means of promoting learning. Candidates develop a management plan that is inclusive respectful and based upon current theory and practice. Effective organization and communication techniques are stressed. Prerequisites admission to the Teacher Education Program and junior standing Corequisite EDUC 303

Unit(s): 3
*
Three-week full-day field practicum taken immediately before student teaching. Candidates teach in a grade-level range different from their student teaching placement but within their range of licensure and certification. Candidates teach a minimum of two times participates in all professional activities of their classroom cooperating teacher and engage in reflective seminars back on campus or through online delivery. Prerequisites
Taught in the style of a seminar a small group of students learn thinking skills through discussion debate peer review and brainstorming. Context varies from section to section. Incoming students rank topic preferences and then are assigned to a section. Focuses specifically on two key areas of personal development (1) intellectual growth is stimulated through systematic critical questioning and (2) a sense of community involvement and responsibility is developed through classroom group work collaborative learning and a class community engagement project. The course also contains success skill exercises and college orientation information including an introduction to the portfolio program. General education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
350 admission to the TEP successful completion of EDUC 370303 and taken in the Interterm or summer before student teaching General education Experiential learning Note Those seeking ESL certification take this course the junior year but after having taken EDUC 370-303.

Unit(s): 3
*
Taken during the student teaching experience this course emphasizes professional licensure requirements and teacher performance standards measuring student academic progress and collaboration models of teaching. Candidates develop various personal skills and resources including the development of an online educational portfolio consistent with InTASC standards for obtaining employment in the education field. Prerequisites admission to the TEP and taken concurrently with student teaching.

Unit(s): 1
*
Fifteen-week final field experience involving instructional planning observation and teaching. Supervised by the classroom cooperating teacher and a college supervisor. Students are expected to assume complete responsibility for the classroom during the student teaching experience and engage in all activities related to teaching in the school community. Prerequisites admission to the Teacher Education Program and completion of all coursework in the Teacher Education Program Corequisite EDUC 450

Unit(s): 13
*

*Courses only offered to students accepted into the Teacher Education Program

Students wishing to pursue this major should declare their intentions early in their academic career due to the significant course loads required to graduate in four years and the need for careful planning and advising.

Nutritional Science Major

Consists of 48 credit hours in the following courses:

Introduction to the structure function and organization of the human body and the scientific method. Topics include chemistry and cell structure anatomy and physiology genetics and evolution. Intended for athletic training health and exercise science and nutrition and wellness majors. Three lectures and one lab per week. Corequisite MATH 118 General Education 2014 natural and physical sciences

Unit(s): 4

Introduction to the structure and function of the human body examining the skeletal muscular circulatory nervous digestive respiratory urinary and reproductive systems. Lecture focuses on topics of physiologyfunction histology and their relation to anatomical structure while the lab focuses on descriptive anatomy. Three lectures and one lab per week. Prerequisites BIOL 110 or 112 or permission of instructor 2014 Summer Session I Begins 5-27-14

Unit(s): 4

Introduction to the physiology of the human body including the physiology of enzymes and membranes tissue physiology (nervous muscular) and a detailed survey of the physiology of the major organ systems. Three lectures and one lab per week. Prerequisites BIOL 111 or BIOL 112 and 305 Credit may not be received for both BIOL 311 and 314

Unit(s): 4

Principles of chemistry including stoichiometry states of matter atomic and molecular structure chemical bonding periodicity energy relationships and equilibria acid-base chemistry electrochemistry kinetics solubility thermodynamics kinetic molecular theory of gases and the systematic study of families of elements. Three hours of lecture and one four-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite MATH 110 MATH 115 or MATH 118 General Education natural and physical sciences Credit may not be received for both CHEM 125 and 161

Unit(s): 4

Principles of chemistry including stoichiometry states of matter atomic and molecular structure chemical bonding periodicity energy relationships and equilibria acid-base chemistry electrochemistry kinetics solubility thermodynamics kinetic molecular theory of gases and the systematic study of families of elements. Three hours of lecture and one four-hour lab per week. Prerequisites CHEM 161 or permission of the instructor General Education natural and physical sciences Credit may not be received for both CHEM 125 and 161

Unit(s): 4

Overview of the functional groups and reactivity of organic molecules using biological examples. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour lab per week. Prerequisites CHEM 125 or 162 Credit may not be received for both CHEM 250 and 305

Unit(s): 4

Examination of the multiple determinants of health and wellness from a personal and community perspective. Through service-based learning experiences students critically analyze individual social and environmental factors that influence health. This course requires students to spend time off-campus serving at community agencies in order to successfully fulfill course requirements. Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 and ENG 110 Experiential learning and writing intensive

Unit(s): 3

Development of community based intervention strategies to modify health risk behaviors with emphasis on theoretical foundations and comprehensive program planning strategies.

Unit(s): 3

Basic nutrition concepts nutrition needs throughout the life cycle and current nutrition issues.

Unit(s): 3

Investigation of the scientific principles involved in basic cookery with emphasis on quality characteristics and product evaluation. Structure composition and nutritive value of foods are studied as well as food selection storage preparation processing and meal management techniques. Food safety and an ecological approach to food selection and preparation is emphasized. Instruction requires two class meetings per week and one three-hour lab.

Unit(s): 3

Nutritional needs throughout each phase of the life cycle are emphasized. Instructional delivery appropriate to each age group is stressed. Prerequisite FCS 240

Unit(s): 3

A study of the effects of nutrition on the well being of the athlete and the relationship of good nutrition to optimum performance. Prerequisite FCS 240

Unit(s): 3

Study of the health and nutritional concerns and needs of a community the nutritional services available to the community preventive nutrition practices and the process involved in identifying designing and implementing programs for the community. Additionally Medical Nutrition Therapy and the Nutrition Care Process is learned and practiced for later development during a practicum or internship. This knowledge provides the student with the tools to practice nutrition medical charting in the clinical setting with the understanding of various diet therapies. Prerequisite FCS 240

Unit(s): 3

Basic counseling skills and models are outlined for students who plan to enter a helping profession. Primary focus is placed on current counseling techniques and strategies. Helping skills such as attending reflecting clarifying empathizing supporting examining feedback confronting and facilitating group process are treated. Goal setting decision making self-awareness and referral techniques are also included. Prerequisite SOC 101 2015 Fall Semester Estimated Extra Cost 45

Unit(s): 3

Coaching Minor

Graphic of NCACE Logo

The coaching minor program at Bridgewater College seeks to prepare competent and quality coaches, in line with the National Standards for Sport Coaches, who will become reflective and transformational leaders in their sport and communities.

The coaching minor program focuses on combining the science and practice of coaching to help students develop the knowledge and skills to effectively coach as well as understand why certain coaching practices are important to implement. Core to our training of coaches is the development of the whole person as our future coaches are encouraged to develop an athlete-centered philosophy, promote life skill development, and see coaching as teaching student-athletes physical as well as mental skills.

Our curriculum incorporates a learner-centered approach using a variety of instructional strategies to meet students’ varied learning styles and experiences and help students develop the knowledge and skills to be an effective coach. The program also incorporates several practical learning experiences (e.g., case studies, coach observations, micro-teaching) culminating in a coaching practicum where the students apply what they have learned as well as reflect on their own coach development.

To attest to the quality of the program, the coaching minor program has been accredited by the National Committee for Accreditation of Coaching Education (NCACE), making it the first undergraduate program at a private, four-year liberal arts college to be accredited.

Advising template for Coaching Minor

The coaching minor consists of 24 credit hours. The following courses are required:

Introduction to the coaching profession. Examination of areas such as developing an athlete-centered philosophy teaching positive values and facilitating social and emotional growth through sport physical training basics the role of nutrition in athletic performance accurate information about drugs and supplements effective communication skills and motivational techniques organizing practices and creating practice plans and generating program and coach evaluations.

Unit(s): 3

Fundamentals of administering first aid in all its aspects with attention to the prevention and treatment of athletic injuries. Emphasis on general safety procedures surrounding activities of school college and community environments. Estimated Extra Cost 2015 Interterm 125

Unit(s): 3

Practical experience in evaluation of physical fitness and its application to the implementation of safe and effective exercise training programs.

Unit(s): 3

Examination of human movement from the perspectives of motor learning motor development and motor control. The basic psychological learning principles and theories apply to the acquisition of motor skills and factors which may influence skill learning are identified as is physical growth and development as related to motor performance across the lifespan.

Unit(s): 3

Examination of standards and policies in the organization supervision and administration of health exercise science and athletics on all school levels and in all phases of the program.

Unit(s): 3

Introduction to the role psychology plays in physical education and sport settings. Exploration of how psychological factors (e.g. personality achievement motivation anxiety) can influence participation in physical activity and motor performance how the structure of sport and physical education programs influence psychological development and how teaching mental skills (e.g. arousal regulation goal setting visualization) may enhance motor performance in physical education and sport. Prerequisites
Taught in the style of a seminar a small group of students learn thinking skills through discussion debate peer review and brainstorming. Context varies from section to section. Incoming students rank topic preferences and then are assigned to a section. Focuses specifically on two key areas of personal development (1) intellectual growth is stimulated through systematic critical questioning and (2) a sense of community involvement and responsibility is developed through classroom group work collaborative learning and a class community engagement project. The course also contains success skill exercises and college orientation information including an introduction to the portfolio program. General education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
or
An introduction to the academic community of Bridgewater College to the liberal arts and to the skills of critical thinking and reflective writing specifically designed for transfer students. Transfer students will explore the unique challenges of integrating into a liberal arts educational environment and will begin the process of documenting their experiences and growth in the four dimensions of personal development intellectual growth and discovery citizenship and community responsibility ethical and spiritual growth and emotional maturation and physical health. general education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
ENG 110 Writing intensive

Unit(s): 3

The course introduces students to the fundamentals of teaching sport skills how to organize and run effective practices and basic strength and conditioning principles to effectively train student-athletes. Organizational methods technological considerations and administrative concerns are also included. Students will also learn the techniques and tactics from basic fundamentals to detailed strategies of a sport as well as gain practical experience with a sport coach. Prerequisite ES 240

Unit(s): 3

Practicum experience within the field of coaching. Students will complete 100 hours of competency-based work in a coaching environment as well as reflect on their experiences as it relates to the knowledge and skill competencies of the National Standards for Sport Coaches. Prerequisites ES 380 and junior standing or permission of instructor

Unit(s): 2

ES activity course

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Child Development Concentration

For students interested in working with children. Consists of 13 credit hours in the following courses:

Development and analysis of the major types of childrens literature are addressed including picture books poetry fables folktales fantasy realism and historical fiction. Students read and analyze classic examples of each type. Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 and ENG 110 General Education Literature Writing Intensive

Unit(s): 3

Theory and practice related to what general education teachers need to know as they work with learners who are provided special education services. Emphasis is on implementing IEPs providing accommodation and differentiation and collaborating co-teaching with special educators. Prerequisite EDUC 140 and EDUC 200 or permission of instructor

Unit(s): 3

Overview of the process of parenting in diverse cultural and familial structures. Exploration of issues related to parenting at various stages of development as well as formation of parenting goals and styles. Emphasis placed on parent-child interactions through the child rearing years. Provides an emphasis on evidence-based practices and evaluation of programming. Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 Experiential learning

Unit(s): 3

Examine issues related to physical cognitive and socio-emotional development of the child from conception through early adolescence. Students will develop theoretical and practical knowledge of child development concepts. Provisions are made for observing and working with preschool children. Prerequisite junior standing

Unit(s): 4

Family Life Education Concentration

For students in any major wishing to work in a community setting as a family life educator. Consists of 15-16 credit hours distributed as follows:

Overview of the process of parenting in diverse cultural and familial structures. Exploration of issues related to parenting at various stages of development as well as formation of parenting goals and styles. Emphasis placed on parent-child interactions through the child rearing years. Provides an emphasis on evidence-based practices and evaluation of programming. Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 Experiential learning

Unit(s): 3

Overview of the psychological social and biological aspects of sexuality that will be of use for communicating with romantic partners doctors and children. Topics include sexual anatomy and physiology sexually transmitted diseases methods of contraception prenatal sexual differentiation sex research attraction and love sexual orientation and sexual dysfunction and sexual ethics. Prerequisite PSY 101 or SOC 101 and junior or senior standing.

Unit(s): 3

Critical examination of principles of the general philosophy and broad principles of family life education in conjunction with the ability to plan implement and evaluate such educational programs. An understanding of the character and quality of human social conduct and the ability to critically examine ethical questions and issues as they relate to professional practice and community concerns and values.

Unit(s): 3

Human Development and Family Science

Choose one course from the following:

Examine issues related to physical cognitive and socio-emotional development of the child from conception through early adolescence. Students will develop theoretical and practical knowledge of child development concepts. Provisions are made for observing and working with preschool children. Prerequisite junior standing

Unit(s): 4

Students will examine family and interpersonal relationships from a variety of theoretical and conceptual frameworks to gain understanding of the changes in society relative to marriage and family. Students will engage in critical examination of issues related to families work and their interrelationships. Emphasis placed upon the reciprocal impacts of relationships within the family and a persons relationships to individuals and other institutions such as educational governmental religious and occupational institutions in society.

Unit(s): 3

Examines issues related to management process and its significance on the quality of life experienced by families with consideration of values goals standards decision making and allocation of resources. Topics include development and allocation of resources social environment influences life cycle and family structure influences and consumer issues and decisions. Prerequisite Junior or senior standing

Unit(s): 3

Students will develop an understanding of the legal issues policies and law influencing the well-being of families. Topics include family and the law relating to marriage divorce family support child custody child protection and rights family planning social services education the economy religion and public policy as it affects the family including tax civil rights social security economic support laws and regulations.

Unit(s): 3

Interpersonal Relationships

Choose one course from the following:

Examines issues related to communication within personal and professional relationships. Students will develop theoretical and practical understandings of verbal and nonverbal communication the role of technology in interpersonal communication and how interpersonal communication functions to develop negotiate maintain and terminate relationships.

Unit(s): 3

Examines issues and research related to communication in romantic relationships including serial arguments conflict management technology mediated communication power dynamics and post-dissolutional communication. Particular emphasis will be placed on examining the utility of popular press relationship advice by comparing and contrasting with empirical research. Alternate years offered 2015-2016 2016 Interterm Estimated Extra Cost 25

Unit(s): 3

Gerontology Concentration

For students in any major wishing to work with the aging population. Consists of 9 credit hours including the following:

Examination of how society supports controls and constrains our arrival into and departure from the world revealing the ways that events often assumed to be natural are in fact conditioned by social and cultural forces. Special emphasis on the communication of cultural norms regarding birth and death the impact of advances in medicine and technology and how birth and death become cultural metaphors for other social phenomena. Prerequisite SOC 101 Alternate years offered 2015-2016

Unit(s): 3

Investigation of the major areas of cognitive psychology. Topics include perception and attention representation of knowledge models of memory problem solvingreasoning language and intelligence. Analysis of the validity and reliability of measuring cognitive processes occur through participation in hands-on experiments and demonstrations. Prerequisite PSY 230 or permission of the instructor

Unit(s): 3

Examine issues related to geriatrics with emphasis on issues including historical cultural biological physiological psychological and social contexts. Opportunities for experiential learning in residential and intermediate facilities with appropriate agencies. Prequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350 Experiential learning

Unit(s): 3

Nutritional Science Concentration

A concentration in nutritional science adds depth to your studies through exploring the basics of foods and current nutrition topics. If you’re interested in health and wellness community programs for em­ployment or wanting a general knowledge of these areas, you will gain the knowledge and experiential learning you need from this concentration. Consists of 9 credit hours including the following:

Basic nutrition concepts nutrition needs throughout the life cycle and current nutrition issues.

Unit(s): 3

Investigation of the scientific principles involved in basic cookery with emphasis on quality characteristics and product evaluation. Structure composition and nutritive value of foods are studied as well as food selection storage preparation processing and meal management techniques. Food safety and an ecological approach to food selection and preparation is emphasized. Instruction requires two class meetings per week and one three-hour lab.

Unit(s): 3

Nutritional needs throughout each phase of the life cycle are emphasized. Instructional delivery appropriate to each age group is stressed. Prerequisite FCS 240

Unit(s): 3

Nutritional Science majors cannot complete a concentration in Nutritional Science.

Pre-Professional Programs and Articulation Agreements

Majors in health and exercise science and athletic training can specifically prepare a student for graduate school admissions in the fields of physical therapy, occupational therapy and physician assistant. The student should team with his/her advisor in order to devise a plan allowing the student to complete all prerequisite courses for graduate school admissions. An articulation agreement exists with Shenandoah University in physical therapy. Students applying to this program and meeting minimal requirements will be strongly considered for admission to the doctorate of physical therapy program. A second articulation agreement exists between Bridgewater College and Methodist University. Two qualified students from Bridgewater College will be admitted into either the physical therapy or occupational therapy programs at Methodist University. Finally, an articulation agreement exists with Mary Baldwin University allowing two qualified students from Bridgewater College to be admitted into their physical therapy, occupational therapy and physician assistant programs. A special applications process is required in order to be considered for the Mary Baldwin University articulation agreement. Please see the department chair, Dr. Robert R. Hammill, for specific information regarding this applications process. All additional questions regarding the articulation agreements should be directed to the student’s advisor or Dr. Hammill.

General Education Requirements

In addition to major offerings, the Department of Health and Human Sciences contributes to the College's general education program. All students are required to develop skill in a physical activity by completing a one-credit activity course. No more than 4 credits in activity courses may be applied toward graduation.

Activity courses meeting the College's general education requirement are listed as follows:

2016 Spring Semester Begins 2-16-16 Last Ten Weeks

Unit(s): 1
(1 Credit; F, S)


Unit(s): 1
(1 Credit; F, S)
(1 Credit; F, S)
Womens Lacrosse is a non-contact field sport which uses sticks to carry and propel the ball. This course intended for beginners will introduce students to 1) basic skills such as cradling throwing and catching 2) basic strategy 3) game rules and 4) the history culture and development of the sport. This course is open to both men and women. All necessary playing and safety equipment will be provided.

Unit(s): 1
(1 Credit; F)
2016 Spring Semester MW Begins 2-15-16 TR Begins 2-16-16 Last Ten Weeks

Unit(s): 1
(1 Credit; F, S)
An introduction to hatha yoga a traditional system of exercise that combines concentration relaxation and mind-body integration with endurance balance and flexibility. 2015 Fall Semester Begins 8-25-15 First Ten Weeks 2016 Spring Semester Begins 1-26-16 First Ten Weeks

Unit(s): 1
(1 Credit; S)
(1 Credit; S)
2013 Interterm Estimated Extra Cost 144 with rentals 132 without rentals

Unit(s): 1
(1 Credit; I)
2013 Interterm Estimated Extra Cost (144 with rentals 132 without rentals)

Unit(s): 1
(1 Credit; I)
2015 Fall Semester Begins 8-26-15 First Ten Weeks 2016 Spring Semester Begins 2-17-16 Last Ten Weeks

Unit(s): 1
(1 Credit; F, S)
2016 Spring Semester Begins 2-17-16 Last Ten Weeks

Unit(s): 1
(1 Credit; F, S)
2015 Fall Semester Begins 8-26-15 First Ten Weeks

Unit(s): 1
(1 Credit; F, S)
2015 Fall Semester Begins 8-25-15 First Ten Weeks 2016 Spring Semester Begins 2-15-16 Last Ten Weeks

Unit(s): 1
(1 Credit; F, S)
2016 Spring Semester Begins 2-15-16 Last Ten Weeks

Unit(s): 1
(1 Credit; F, S)
(1 Credit; S)
(1 Credit; F, S)
This course introduces students to the use of the medieval longsword as taught by the German and Italian fechtmeister (fight or fencing masters) in the 14th and 15th centuries. Instruction will encompass fundamentals (stance footwork focus initiative etc.) principles of attack and defense and advanced techniques (windings close-quarter play half-sword techniques). The chivalric attitudes of honor and courtesy will be emphasized in partner drills throughout the course. The evolution of swords and armor during that period will also be discussed. General Education ES activity

Unit(s): 1
(1 Credit; F)
This course will introduce students to Ultimate Frisbee a growing sport that combines many aspects of football soccer and basketball. Instruction will include rules of the game development of individual skills (throwing catching and defensive technique) and team strategy. Students will participate in small-scale drills that develop individual technique and team strategy as well as team game play. General Education ES Activity

Unit(s): 1
(1 Credit; F)
(1 Credit; S) successful completion leads to American Red Cross certification