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Environmental Science Concentration

Division of Natural Sciences

The concentration in environmental science allows students in majors across any discipline to examine critically the issues around human use and abuse of natural resources.

The following courses are required:

Introduces basic biological conceptsand applies them to help students understand thecauses and solutions of environmental problems.Addresses a wide variety of environmental issuesincluding biodiversity loss the effects ofpollution on organisms and ecosystems and globalclimate change. Special emphasis given to helpstudents understand how scientific knowledge isdeveloped and scientific information can befound interpreted and applied by society. Threelectures and one laboratory per week.Corequisite MATH 118 or MATH 110FILA general education natural and physicalsciences

Unit(s): 4

ENVR/
Exploration of basic biological chemicalgeological and physical processes at work on theearth its lifeforms and its natural resources.The extent of human impact and the need forglobal awareness are emphasized along with theneed for application of rapidly expandingknowledge and technology toward solution ofenvironmental problems. Three lectures and onelab per week.Prerequisites BIOL 110 and 111 or CHEM 161 and162 or permission of instructor

Unit(s): 4


Choose two from the following list:

CHEM/
This course is designed to introduce students tothe chemical principles underlying environmentalissues scientific literacy pertinent to theenvironment and scientific articles and examinethe implications of environmental policy. Prerequisites CHEM-125 or CHEM-162

Unit(s): 4

CHEM/
The chemistry and quantitative aspects ofenvironmentally important cycles (C N O P S)in the context of the atmosphere hydrosphere andlithosphere. Major environmental issues arediscussed such as acid rain sewage treatmentozone destruction anthropogenic climate changeair pollution and eutrophication. Laboratoriesinvolve sampling quantitative detection and dataanalysis. Three hours of lecture and onefour-hour lab per week. Prerequisites CHEM-162

Unit(s): 4

This course is a study of the environment on theEarths surface the boundary between the solidand liquid and interactions between rock andwater. This will include weathering and theformation of soil and the flow of water at thesurface and below ground level. Lab activitieswill include sampling and analysis of soilsurface water and groundwater.Prerequisites ENVR-301

Unit(s): 3

This course will provide an overview of federaland state laws that are aimed at the conservationof natural resources andor protection ofenvironmental quality. Major laws that will becovered include the National EnvironmentalProtection Act Clean Air Act Clean Water Actthe Endangered Species Act and others. Speakersfrom natural resourceenvironmental agencies suchas the Va. Department of Environmental QualityVa. Department of Game and Inland Fisheries andU.S. Forest Service will provide practicalinsights into the application and implementationof environmental policy.Prerequisites BIOL 100 101 or 110Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 3

ENVR/
Explores the ecology and management of wildlifewith an emphasis on North American mammals andbirds. Topics include habitat quality forestrynutrition disease population dynamics anddiversity. Also explores human dimensions in theNorth American stakeholder model of wildlifemanagement. Lab emphasizes field techniques.Three lectures and one lab per week.Prerequisites PDP 150 or 350 ENG 110 and BIOL111 or permission of instructorAlternate years offered 2016-2017General education Writing Intensive

Unit(s): 4

Explores the anatomy physiology ecology andbehaviors that have produced an extraordinarybiodiversity of bird species. The major groups ofmodern birds are introduced and their originand ecology are examined. Students learnto recognize local species in the field andexamine them in the lab using the ornithologycollections. Suitable for bothbiology majors and non-majors.Prerequisites BIOL 100 or 110Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

An introduction to the study of amphibians andreptiles. Lectures will focus on the origin andevolution of amphibians and reptiles and ontheir biology ecology and conservation. Lab willemphasize taxonomy anatomy speciesidentification and common field techniques usedto study these groups.Prerequisite BIOL 111Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

A comprehensive survey of mammals. Lectures willfocus on phylogenetics the origin and evolutionof mammals and their biology ecology andconservation. Lab will emphasize taxonomyspecies identification and common fieldtechniques used to study mammals.Prerequisite BIOL 111Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

Survey of the vascular flora of the ShenandoahValley and surrounding mountain areas.Field-based course that introduces students tothe identification of plants in the field oftheirecology. Plant collection and specimenpreservation are also included.Prerequisites BIOL 1112017 Summer Session I Begins 5-30-17 CANCELED

Unit(s): 4

A comprehensive survey of the plant kingdom thatwill include topics ranging from plant anatomyphysiology diversity and ecology. Studentsinterested in ecology forestry and wildlifebiology will find this course particularlyuseful. Three lectures and one lab per week.Prerequisite BIOL 111Alternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 4

BIOL/
This course will provide a framework for studyinghow animals function in their native environmentsat different stages of their life cycles. Itsscope is animal physiology blended withenvironmental science principles ofphysiological mechanisms are examined from theperspective of physiological adaptation in agiven environmental context including specificadaptations to environmental extremes. Coursestructure active learning lectures and appliedlearning labs. Development of critical scientificthinking and scientific writing are significantcomponents of the course.Prerequisites
Taught in the style of a seminar a small groupof students learn thinking skills throughdiscussion debate peer review andbrainstorming. Context varies from section tosection. Incoming students rank topic preferencesand then are assigned to a section. Focusesspecifically on two key areas of personaldevelopment (1) intellectual growth isstimulated through systematic criticalquestioning and (2) a sense of communityinvolvement and responsibility is developedthrough classroom group work collaborativelearning and a class community engagementproject. The course also contains success skillexercises and college orientation informationincluding an introduction to the portfolioprogram.General education master core skills2017 Fall Semester TopicsPDP-150-01 A Mans Man and a Womans WomanPDP-150-02 The Power of Physical Activity andSportPDP-150-03 Human Behavior in a Computational AgePDP-150-04 Strange IdeasPDP-150-05 After the ScourgePDP-150-06 Swimming in a sea of misinformationPDP-150-07 A Mans Man and a Womans WomanPDP-150-08 Creativity in the Arts SciencesBusiness Sports... in LifePDP-150-09 How to Rock the BoatPDP-150-10 Superhero NarrativesPDP-150-11 Dog is My Co-PilotPDP-150-12 Leadership and the Art of DecisionPDP-150-13 Free PlayPDP-150-14 Knowledge The Only FrontierPDP-150-15 Music Sweet Music PDP-150-16 The Fine Line between Glory & GuiltPDP-150-17 The Souls of Black Folk CriticalReadings By and About African Americans in the20th and 21st CenturiesPDP-150-18 Whos Sorry Now Thinking ThroughApologies Made on the Public StagePDP-150-19 Chickens Chickens ChickensPDP-150-20 The Narnian The Life and Imaginationof C.S. LewisPDP-150-21 Liberal Arts of the Living DeadPDP-150-22 Liberal Arts of the Living DeadPDP-150-23 Human Behavior in a Computational AgePDP-150-24 Latino USAPDP-150-25 Tweet Friend Pin Social Media &You as a 21st Century CitizenPDP-150-26 The Power of Physical Activity andSportPDP-150-29 Free PlayPDP-150-30 Media Narratives Spinning the Truth

Unit(s): 3
or
An introduction to the academic community ofBridgewater College to the liberal arts and tothe skills of critical thinking and reflectivewriting specifically designed for transferstudents. Transfer students will explore theunique challenges of integrating into a liberalarts educational environment and will begin theprocess of documenting their experiences andgrowth in the four dimensions of personaldevelopment intellectual growth and discoverycitizenship and community responsibility ethicaland spiritual growth and emotional maturationandphysical health.general education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
ENG-110BIOL-110 and BIOL-111 and
A precalculus course for students continuing inmathematics. Includes topics in algebrafunctionsand relations and trigonometry.Prerequisites MATH 110 or satisfactoryperformance on placement test

Unit(s): 3
FILA general education writing intensive

Unit(s): 4

This course is an introduction to GeographicInformation Systems (GIS). GIS is a computerizedsystem that allows users to collect storevisualize and analyze locationalgeospatial data.Students learn basic cartographic concepts andthe use of common GIS software programs. Thecourse focuses on environmental and biologicalapplications of GIS while the technology also hasmany applications in earth sciences urbanplanning business etc.Prerequisites
A precalculus course for students continuing inmathematics. Includes topics in algebrafunctionsand relations and trigonometry.Prerequisites MATH 110 or satisfactoryperformance on placement test

Unit(s): 3


Unit(s): 4

ENVR/
Exploration of how microorganisms interact withtheir environment and the implications of theseinteractions for humans. Specific topicsinclude antibiotic resistance biodegradationbiodiversity biofuels bioremediation extremeenvironments geochemical cycles methods forsampling culture and analysis of environmentalmicroorganisms microbiology of air water andsoil environmental pathogens andmicrobiologicaltreatment of sewage and water. Three lectures andone lab per week.Prerequisites BIOL 309 or ENVRCHEM 320Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

Survey of the methods used bythe public and private sectors to manage ourenvironment and natural resources. The primaryemphasis will be on restoration ecology andconservation biology. Other topics that will beaddressed will include environmental engineering(e.g. green chemistry and design of pollutioncontrol devices) economic considerations inconservation (e.g. conservation land easementsand ecotourism) and government regulation. Thelab will provide students with experienceapplyingstandard methods of monitoring biologicalresources. The lab will also provide anopportunity for students to hear talks fromenvironmental experts and to travel to localsites where management activities are occurring.Prerequisite BIOL 111 or permission of theinstructorAlternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 4

ENVR/
Survey of diversity of fish (with an emphasison freshwater fish of North America). Topicsinclude taxonomy anatomy physiology behaviorand ecology. Special emphasis onmanagement of fish populations and diversityin the face of environmental threats includingpollution habitat alteration overharvest andinvasive species. Lab includes basic ecologyand behavior but focuses heavily on commonfisheries techniques.Prerequisites BIOLENVR 301 or BIOL 350 orpermission of instructorAlternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 4

ENVR/
Introduction to aquatic ecosystems (lakesponds streams and wetlands). Students learnabout the major chemical and physical processesthat determine the function of freshwatersystems. Students are introduced to the majorgroups of aquatic organisms (algae vascularplants invertebrates fish and amphibians).Strongemphasis on the impacts that humans have onfreshwater systems. The lab introduces thebasic skills necessary for the study andmanagement of fresh waters.Prerequisites BIOLENVR 301 or BIOL 350 orpermission of instructorAlternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4


Students may not double count the courses in the elective list for the environmental science concentration on any other plan of major or minor.

Questions? Contact us!

Dr. Robyn Puffenbarger, Department Chair
540-828-5713
rpuffenb@bridgewater.edu