Skip to main content
Chemistry at BC Page Banner Photo

Explore the Makeup of Our Natural World

Chemistry Major

Division of Natural Sciences

Earn your degree in chemistry at Bridgewater College. Build on an understanding of general principles to specialize in the different areas of chemistry. Perform research and present your findings. You have a world of opportunities waiting for you.

Chemistry Major

Consists of 53-54 credit hours including the following courses:

Principles of chemistry including stoichiometry states of matter atomic and molecular structure chemical bonding periodicity energy relationships and equilibria acid-base chemistry electrochemistry kinetics solubility thermodynamics kinetic molecular theory of gases and the systematic study of families of elements. Three hours of lecture and one four-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite MATH 110 MATH 115 or MATH 118 General Education natural and physical sciences Credit may not be received for both CHEM 125 and 161

Unit(s): 4

Principles of chemistry including stoichiometry states of matter atomic and molecular structure chemical bonding periodicity energy relationships and equilibria acid-base chemistry electrochemistry kinetics solubility thermodynamics kinetic molecular theory of gases and the systematic study of families of elements. Three hours of lecture and one four-hour lab per week. Prerequisites CHEM 161 or permission of the instructor General Education natural and physical sciences Credit may not be received for both CHEM 125 and 161

Unit(s): 4

Structure nomenclature reaction mechanisms synthesis and identification of organic molecules. Three hours of lecture and one four-hour lab per week. Prerequisite CHEM 162 or permission of the instructor Credit cannot be earned for both CHEM 250 and 305

Unit(s): 4

A continuation of organic chemistry started in CHEM 305 including a study of the interpretation of infrared spectroscopy proton and carbon NMR UV-visible spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The lab will be an introduction to chemical research that includes research methods and techniques through a series of experiments. Prerequisite CHEM 305 Credit may not be received for both 306 and 310 or for both CHEM-308 and CHEM-310

Unit(s): 5

Physical properties electronic structure and reactivity of transition metal compounds. Three hours of lecture and one four-hour lab per week. Prerequisite CHEM 306 or 310 Alternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 4

Exposure to methods of quantitation signalto- noise enhancement instrumental design and function methods of spectroscopy chromatography electroanalytical analysis and mass spectrometry. Three hours of lecture and one four-hour lab per week. Prerequisite CHEM 250 or 305 Alternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 4

Thermodynamics equilibrium chemical structures and reaction rates as applied to biological systems and macromolecules. Three of lecture per week. Prerequisites CHEM 306 or 310 MATH 130 or 131 or permission of instructor Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 3

Physical states of chemical systems- thermodynamics equilibria reaction rates electrochemistry and photochemistry- with lab examination of reactions in multicomponent systems. Three hours of lecture and four hours of lab work per week. Prerequisites for CHEM 415 MATH 132 and PHYS 222 or permission of instructor. Alternate years offered 2017-2018 Credit may not be received for both CHEM 425 and 427

Unit(s): 4

A year-long project in collaboration with a member of the Chemistry faculty. One hour lecture and a minimum of eight hours of lab per week. Prerequisite Senior standing or permission of the department (CHEM 451 is required for CHEM 452)

Unit(s): 2

A year-long project in collaboration with a member of the Chemistry faculty. One hour lecture and a minimum of eight hours of lab per week. Prerequisite Senior standing or permission of the department (CHEM 451 is required for CHEM 452)

Unit(s): 2

-or-
An Honors Project is one in which a student researches a subject by examination of relevant literature or by experimentation or both the student reports the results in an accurately documented and well-written paper or appropriate representation of the work. Whenever the study deals with the subject of an established course the student is expected to go well beyond the usual work of the course in research and in assimilation of the results as revealed in the report. Juniors and seniors with a cumulative grade point average of 3.40 or above may register for an Honors Project. One desiring to pursue an Honors Project must submit a written description of his or her proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs by the first day of the semester in which the study is to be conducted. At the conclusion of the Honors Project the supervising professor files with the Registrar a grade for the student and a description of the work accomplished and with the Library Director a copy of the written paper or appropriate representation of the work. It is the students responsibility to provide the materials for the library in compliance with specifications approved by the Council on Education. The Library Director arranges for binding and storage.

Unit(s): 3

Study of differential calculus of a single variable. Applications of the derivative are made to curve sketching max-min problems and linear approximation and IHopitals Rule. Also included are applications of the Intermediate Value Theorem and Mean Value Theorem. Credit may not be received for both MATH 130 and 131. Prerequisites MATH 120 or satisfactory performance on placement test

Unit(s): 3

Study of integral calculus of a single variable. Included are techniques of integration and numerical methods of integration. Applications of the integral are made to computing area volume arc length and selected topics. Prerequisite MATH 131

Unit(s): 3

During the first term Kinematics Newtons laws of motion conservation laws rotational motion periodic motion and fluid mechanics. During the second term Thermodynamics electricity magnetism optics and modern physics. A combination of lectures and learning by inquiry are employed. Computers are used for data acquisition data analysis and mathematical modeling. Three hours in class one hour in recitation and two hours in lab per week. Prerequisite MATH 130 or 132 or concurrent enrollment in MATH 131 132 respectively.

Unit(s): 4

During the first term Kinematics Newtons laws of motion conservation laws rotational motion periodic motion and fluid mechanics. During the second term Thermodynamics electricity magnetism optics and modern physics. A combination of lectures and learning by inquiry are employed. Computers are used for data acquisition data analysis and mathematical modeling. Three hours in class one hour in recitation and two hours in lab per week. Prerequisite MATH 130 or 132 or concurrent enrollment in MATH 131 132 respectively. PHYS 221is prerequisite to PHYS 222. General Education Natural & Physical Science

Unit(s): 4

And one additional CHEM course numbered 350 or above.

Activities and Clubs

Conduct independent research projects like these under the supervision of faculty:

  • “Hydroformylation of Alkenes with Iron Catalysts”
  • “A Study of the Leaching of Bisphenol A”
  • “A Study of Suspect Drug Components in Bacterial Growth”
  • “Graywater Recycling Using a Biological Treatment System”
  • “Caution! The Danger of Heating Before Eating”

And as a senior, present your research at the undergraduate research symposium sponsored by the Virginia Section of the American Chemical Society.

Network with your fellow students and faculty as part of the Chemistry Club.

Careers and Graduate Schools

What can you do with your chemistry degree?

Like our recent graduates, you might enter graduate schools such as:

  • Boston University
  • George Mason University
  • Georgetown University
  • University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
  • Shenandoah University
  • University of Tennessee
  • University of Virginia
  • West Virginia University

Or pursue a career in:

  • Environmental protection
  • Field analysis
  • Government
  • Higher education
  • Industry
  • Law
  • Secondary education
  • Technical writing and editing
  • Water and wastewater studies

Learn more about career paths, employment and advancement in the field of chemistry from the American Chemical Society.

Visit the Department Homepage

Questions? Contact us!

Dr. Kenneth Overway Department Chair
540-828-5727
koverway@bridgewater.edu