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Theatre Minor

Division of Communication Studies, Fine Arts and Literature

As you minor in theatre, you’ll have the opportunity to not only study great theatrical works, but also gain hands-on experience in any aspect of stage production. Theatre faculty and students produce and direct several major productions each year.

Consists of 21 credit hours. The following courses are required:

9 credit hours of the following:

This course is an introduction to the many elements involved in Western theatre production with emphases on two of the primary areas of design construction and implementation scenery and costumes and an integration with stage management. The class will explore concepts techniques equipment and materials necessary for a successful theatrical production emphasizing problem solving through research experimentation and collaboration. Students will be challenged to engage and understand the interrelationships between the various elements involved in mounting a stage production and how these elements relate to and affect the other aspects of dramatic art. Previous experience with theatre is not necessary. Corequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 General education fine arts & music

Unit(s): 3

-or-
An introduction to the many elements involved in Western theatre production with a special focus on stage management and emphases on two of the primary areas of design construction and implementation lighting and sound. The class will explore concepts techniques equipment and materials necessary for a successful theatrical production emphasizing problem solving through research experimentation and collaboration. Students will be challenged to engage and understand the interrelationships between the various elements involved in mounting a stage production and how these elements relate to and affect the other aspects of dramatic art. Previous experience with theatre is not necessary. Co-requisites
Taught in the style of a seminar a small group of students learn thinking skills through discussion debate peer review and brainstorming. Context varies from section to section. Incoming students rank topic preferences and then are assigned to a section. Focuses specifically on two key areas of personal development (1) intellectual growth is stimulated through systematic critical questioning and (2) a sense of community involvement and responsibility is developed through classroom group work collaborative learning and a class community engagement project. The course also contains success skill exercises and college orientation information including an introduction to the portfolio program. General education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
or
An introduction to the academic community of Bridgewater College to the liberal arts and to the skills of critical thinking and reflective writing specifically designed for transfer students. Transfer students will explore the unique challenges of integrating into a liberal arts educational environment and will begin the process of documenting their experiences and growth in the four dimensions of personal development intellectual growth and discovery citizenship and community responsibility ethical and spiritual growth and emotional maturation and physical health. general education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3


Unit(s): 3

Traces the development of dramatic art and the history of theatrical production from its ritual beginnings to the English Restoration. It will place dramatic art and theatre history in context by engaging with the social political and cultural conditions of specific historical moments. Topics of study will include Greek Drama Roman spectacle Sanskrit Drama Noh Drama early Medieval religious and secular theatre Italian commedia dellarte Renaissance and Baroque pageantry and the English Restoration. The approach will be a documentary one. Students will read specific play texts in conjunction with primary evidence both textural and pictorial using both to illuminate the creation and history of theatre. Corequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350 General Education Fine arts and music Alternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 3

-or-
Survey of post-Restoration theatrical culture history and production forms. Though it is a continuation of the World Theatre History I the student need not have taken the previous course. Students will begin examining theatrical history and expression in Turkey China and Japan and move across the European continent focusing on the rise of European modernity. Students will cover Romantic theatre and opera melodrama and poetic spectacle Realism Naturalism and the independent theatre movement as well as the innovation of early 20th century theatrical practitioners. The approach will be a documentary one. Students will read specific play texts in conjunction with primary evidence textural and pictorial using both to illuminate the creation and history of theatre. Corequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350 and ENG 110 General Education Fine arts & music Alternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 3

Acting provides the student with an organized and practical approach to acting. A systematic approach to acting through a thorough examination and application of Konstantin Stanislavskis system of acting with in depth attention to the technique of the actor and their use of body and voice. Textual analysis scene work monologues auditioning performance pieces and various training exercises will be used. No theatre experience is necessary. Corequisite
Taught in the style of a seminar a small group of students learn thinking skills through discussion debate peer review and brainstorming. Context varies from section to section. Incoming students rank topic preferences and then are assigned to a section. Focuses specifically on two key areas of personal development (1) intellectual growth is stimulated through systematic critical questioning and (2) a sense of community involvement and responsibility is developed through classroom group work collaborative learning and a class community engagement project. The course also contains success skill exercises and college orientation information including an introduction to the portfolio program. General education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
or
An introduction to the academic community of Bridgewater College to the liberal arts and to the skills of critical thinking and reflective writing specifically designed for transfer students. Transfer students will explore the unique challenges of integrating into a liberal arts educational environment and will begin the process of documenting their experiences and growth in the four dimensions of personal development intellectual growth and discovery citizenship and community responsibility ethical and spiritual growth and emotional maturation and physical health. general education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
Alternate years offered 2017-2018 FILA fine arts & music (effective 2016-17)

Unit(s): 3

-or-
This course will introduce the student to the physical vocal and mental worlds of various styles and techniques of non-realistic performance traditions. Students will experiment with a variety of acting styles and techniques including Greek Shakespearean Restoration Modern and Post-Modern performance. This course is a practical expression of the theoretical and historical. Textual analysis scene work monologues and various training exercises will be used. No theatre experience is necessary. Corequisite
Taught in the style of a seminar a small group of students learn thinking skills through discussion debate peer review and brainstorming. Context varies from section to section. Incoming students rank topic preferences and then are assigned to a section. Focuses specifically on two key areas of personal development (1) intellectual growth is stimulated through systematic critical questioning and (2) a sense of community involvement and responsibility is developed through classroom group work collaborative learning and a class community engagement project. The course also contains success skill exercises and college orientation information including an introduction to the portfolio program. General education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
or
An introduction to the academic community of Bridgewater College to the liberal arts and to the skills of critical thinking and reflective writing specifically designed for transfer students. Transfer students will explore the unique challenges of integrating into a liberal arts educational environment and will begin the process of documenting their experiences and growth in the four dimensions of personal development intellectual growth and discovery citizenship and community responsibility ethical and spiritual growth and emotional maturation and physical health. general education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3


Unit(s): 3

3 credit hours of the following:

The production laboratory requires intense involvement with the process of translating a play text from script to performance. It will require students to work independently and as an ensemble interpreting rehearsing and performing a play. Those enrolled will be expected to rehearse five to six nights per week for eight weeks exhibiting a commitment to their peers and the production. Each student will be required to keep a journal of their process of character creation as well as submit a significant final paper that analyzes the entire production as well as their own participation. Significant in-class and out-of-class work is essential. Prerequisite By audition

Unit(s): 3

-or-
This production laboratory requires intense involvement with the process of translating a play text from script to performance. It requires students to work independently under faculty supervision interpreting and realizing theatrical design specific to their area of interest set design light design costume design property design. Students will be responsible for submitting such work as light plots ground plans rendering (lighting set costume) drawings andor sketches models and production workbooks. Furthermore students will be required to realize their ideas on stage whether through light set costume or prop construction. Students will be required to attend weekly production meetings in addition to selected rehearsals. Professionalism and dedication to theatrical production will be stressed. Each student will be required to submit a significant final paper that analyzes the entire production as well as their own participation. Significant in-class and out-of-class work is essential. Prerequisite Permission of the instructor

Unit(s): 3

-or-
This production laboratory will require intense involvement with the process of translating a play text from script to performance. It requires students to work independently under faculty supervision. Stage Management and Directing students will be required to attend rehearsals provide a detailed dramaturgical analysis of the production including production histories submit a dramaturgical note for the program organize and moderate post-performance talk backs with the cast crew and audience as well as submit a significant paper analyzing the production and their participation. Professionalism and dedication to theatrical production will be stressed. Significant in-class and out-of-class work is essential. Prerequisite Permission of the instructor

Unit(s): 3

An additional 9 credit hours must be chosen from the following courses:

Theatre Practice and Design:

A studio project-based introduction to the elements and principles of 2-D and 3-D design in visual art and communication contexts. Emphasis is on visual problem solving mastery of visual design principles technical proficiency and critical analysis of how visual images communicate. This course provides a foundation for students planning to take advanced courses in any art media and other fields in which visual imagery plays an important role. As a stand-alone course Art 120 provides critical and practical skills related to visual communication.

Unit(s): 3

A studio based exploration of drawing from observation using basic materials like graphite and charcoal. This course investigates drawing as a process generating and critically evaluating visual ideas as well as producing visual imagery. Art 130 is a foundation course for students planning to take advanced art courses in any medium. As a stand-alone this course builds practical and theoretical skills in seeing and making the 2-D images we call drawings. Corequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 General Education fine arts & music

Unit(s): 3

A project based investigation of the materials practices and aesthetics of painting with emphasis on how these three elements work together to create compelling 2-D colored images. This course provides practical and theoretical foundations for four hundred-level courses in drawing and painting and for independent work in these media. Corequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350 General Education fine arts and music

Unit(s): 3

Produce short videos using digital cameras and editing software. Emphasis is placed on developing skills in camera operation lighting audio and editing and development of effective narrative structure and non-fiction storytelling. Note Students must provide a DSLR or compact camera capable of HD video capture and external hard drive appropriate for video editing. Corequisite COMM 100 General Education fine arts and music

Unit(s): 3

Emphasis on factors influencing fashion including the sociological psychological and physiological aspects of clothing and basic construction of clothing.

Unit(s): 3

No musical experience required. An introduction to reading music scales key signatures intervals rhythms instruments and score study. Hands-on musical activities include eurhythmics singing and the playing of simple percussive and melodic instruments. Serves as a prerequisite to some courses in music students may place out of this course by passing the music fundamentals diagnostic test. Corequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350 General education fine arts & music

Unit(s): 3

-or-
Diatonic harmony voice leading and phrase structure. Aural skills include sight singing and melodic dictation. Prerequisites MUS 110

Unit(s): 3

This course is an introduction to the many elements involved in Western theatre production with emphases on two of the primary areas of design construction and implementation scenery and costumes and an integration with stage management. The class will explore concepts techniques equipment and materials necessary for a successful theatrical production emphasizing problem solving through research experimentation and collaboration. Students will be challenged to engage and understand the interrelationships between the various elements involved in mounting a stage production and how these elements relate to and affect the other aspects of dramatic art. Previous experience with theatre is not necessary. Corequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 General education fine arts & music

Unit(s): 3

-or-
An introduction to the many elements involved in Western theatre production with a special focus on stage management and emphases on two of the primary areas of design construction and implementation lighting and sound. The class will explore concepts techniques equipment and materials necessary for a successful theatrical production emphasizing problem solving through research experimentation and collaboration. Students will be challenged to engage and understand the interrelationships between the various elements involved in mounting a stage production and how these elements relate to and affect the other aspects of dramatic art. Previous experience with theatre is not necessary. Co-requisites
Taught in the style of a seminar a small group of students learn thinking skills through discussion debate peer review and brainstorming. Context varies from section to section. Incoming students rank topic preferences and then are assigned to a section. Focuses specifically on two key areas of personal development (1) intellectual growth is stimulated through systematic critical questioning and (2) a sense of community involvement and responsibility is developed through classroom group work collaborative learning and a class community engagement project. The course also contains success skill exercises and college orientation information including an introduction to the portfolio program. General education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
or
An introduction to the academic community of Bridgewater College to the liberal arts and to the skills of critical thinking and reflective writing specifically designed for transfer students. Transfer students will explore the unique challenges of integrating into a liberal arts educational environment and will begin the process of documenting their experiences and growth in the four dimensions of personal development intellectual growth and discovery citizenship and community responsibility ethical and spiritual growth and emotional maturation and physical health. general education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3


Unit(s): 3

Movement for Theatre is designed to help the student better understand herhis body and its potential and capacities for creative expression on the stage. Through studio explorations readings and presentations the student will be invited to find herhis physical neutral so that choice and growth become possible. Working as a soloist in duets and groups the student will develop new ways to listen and communicate through movement. Applications of these newly developed skills will extend beyond the stage. No previous theatre or movement experience necessary. Corequisite
Taught in the style of a seminar a small group of students learn thinking skills through discussion debate peer review and brainstorming. Context varies from section to section. Incoming students rank topic preferences and then are assigned to a section. Focuses specifically on two key areas of personal development (1) intellectual growth is stimulated through systematic critical questioning and (2) a sense of community involvement and responsibility is developed through classroom group work collaborative learning and a class community engagement project. The course also contains success skill exercises and college orientation information including an introduction to the portfolio program. General education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
or
An introduction to the academic community of Bridgewater College to the liberal arts and to the skills of critical thinking and reflective writing specifically designed for transfer students. Transfer students will explore the unique challenges of integrating into a liberal arts educational environment and will begin the process of documenting their experiences and growth in the four dimensions of personal development intellectual growth and discovery citizenship and community responsibility ethical and spiritual growth and emotional maturation and physical health. general education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
General education fine arts and music

Unit(s): 3

This course is a practical study of the various theories techniques and materials used in scenic painting. Focusing on theory and practice this course will encompass a systematic approach to painting theatrical scenery. Emphasis will be placed on traditional scene painting techniques including material selection (brushes and paints) and their practical application through design reproductions and faux finishes as well as the tools and paints that have been developed to support those techniques. Students will learn how the theories and techniques of scenic painting have changed historically and learn how these unique changes have impacted the material and techniques utilized by the scenic painter. This course will engage with the unique qualities of different types of paint noting how they will perform on different types of materials and how that knowledge can be used to created effective results. Projects will include painting stage drops creating stained glass windows with paint faux marble and wood grain finishes photos and designer renderings. Corequisite
Taught in the style of a seminar a small group of students learn thinking skills through discussion debate peer review and brainstorming. Context varies from section to section. Incoming students rank topic preferences and then are assigned to a section. Focuses specifically on two key areas of personal development (1) intellectual growth is stimulated through systematic critical questioning and (2) a sense of community involvement and responsibility is developed through classroom group work collaborative learning and a class community engagement project. The course also contains success skill exercises and college orientation information including an introduction to the portfolio program. General education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
or
An introduction to the academic community of Bridgewater College to the liberal arts and to the skills of critical thinking and reflective writing specifically designed for transfer students. Transfer students will explore the unique challenges of integrating into a liberal arts educational environment and will begin the process of documenting their experiences and growth in the four dimensions of personal development intellectual growth and discovery citizenship and community responsibility ethical and spiritual growth and emotional maturation and physical health. general education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
FILA general education fine arts & music (effective 2016-17)

Unit(s): 3

An exploration of the rich and varied theatrical scenes in London through nightly attendance at professional and nonprofessional productions. The group attends professional West End classical modern and musical productions. A music hall performance and holiday pantomime as well as lively nonprofessional theatre in the London suburbs are on the itinerary. Daytime backstage tours and visits to the Theatre Museum and other locations of theatrical historical and cultural interests complement the experience as do side-trips to Stratford-upon-Avon and Oxford. Offered on demand. Corequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350 General education fine arts and music Estimated Extra Cost 3500 Offered on demand

Unit(s): 3

The internship program provides an opportunity for a student to gain field experience in an area related to the students concentration or career goals. Supervision of an intern is provided by an appropriate faculty member and by a staff member of the agency or business in which the student is an intern. A student who wishes to engage in an internship must consult with the appropriate faculty member at least eight weeks in advance of the start of the term in which the internship is to be completed. A description of the internship signed by the student and the faculty sponsor must be filed with the Director of Internships by the first day of the semester prior to the start of the internship. Approval of each application for an internship is made by the Director of Internships based upon policies and guidelines as approved by the Council on Education and the faculty. To be considered for an internship a student must have junior or senior status and at least a 2.00 grade point average. Internships are graded on an S or U basis. A student may enroll in an internship program for three credits per semester and internship credit may be earned in subsequent semesters subject to the limitations that no more than two internships may be pursued in any one agency or business and a maximum of nine credits in internships may be applied toward graduation.

Unit(s): 3

Upon approval of the Department and the Vice President and Dean of Academic Affairs a student with a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 or better may engage in an independent study or research project. One desiring to pursue independent study or research must submit a written description of the proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs by the first day of the semester in which the study is to be conducted. At the end of the semester the supervising professor files with the Registrar a grade for the student and a description of the work accomplished. Credit may be received for not more than three independent studies or research projects.

Unit(s): 3

Upon approval of the Department and the VicePresident and Dean of Academic Affairs a studentwith a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 orbetter may engage in an independent study orresearch project. One desiring to pursueindependent study or research must submit awritten description of the proposed work to thechair of the appropriate department and to theVice President and Dean for Academic Affairs bythe first day of the semester in which the studyis to be conducted. At the end of the semesterthe supervising professor files with theRegistrar a grade for the student and a description of the work accomplished. Credit may be received fornot more than three independent studies or research projects.

Unit(s): 3

An Honors Project is one in which a student researches a subject by examination of relevant literature or by experimentation or both the student reports the results in an accurately documented and well-written paper or appropriate representation of the work. Whenever the study deals with the subject of an established course the student is expected to go well beyond the usual work of the course in research and in assimilation of the results as revealed in the report. Juniors and seniors with a cumulative grade point average of 3.40 or above may register for an Honors Project. One desiring to pursue an Honors Project must submit a written description of his or her proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs by the first day of the semester in which the study is to be conducted. At the conclusion of the Honors Project the supervising professor files with the Registrar a grade for the student and a description of the work accomplished and with the Library Director a copy of the written paper or appropriate representation of the work. It is the students responsibility to provide the materials for the library in compliance with specifications approved by the Council on Education. The Library Director arranges for binding and storage.

Unit(s): 3

History, Theory and Criticism: 
Select 1 course (3 credit hours) from list below or other course(s) approved by department.

Environmental theatre began in the 1960s in response to the social and political climate of the time. Performers and performance groups pushed the boundaries of what was traditionally thought of as theatre and as a result restructured and reinvigorated the fundamental understanding of what performance was and its function within society. Environmental theatre continues to be a powerful vehicle for social commentary. The objective of this course is three-fold to introduce the student to the cultural social and political richness of environmental theatre including site-specific performance to provide a historical understanding of the period by highlighting how the original practitioners and their works were directly influenced by cultural events of the time and to involve the student in the process of creating and performing their own individual and group site-specific environmental performance piece. Corequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350 General Education Fine arts and music

Unit(s): 3

THEA/
Examination of theatrical literature and forms from the late 19th century well-made plays Realism Expressionism Futurism and Symbolism to Epic theatre and the Theatre of the Absurd. Playwrights such as Henrik Ibsen Bernard Shaw Anton Chekhov Eugene ONeill Bertolt Brecht Samuel Beckett and others will be studied. The goals of this course are for students to gain an understanding of the scope history techniques and influence of Modern Drama. Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 and ENG 110 General Education Literature & Writing Intensive Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 3

THEA/
Contemporary theatrical forms of American and British drama. Begins with post-World War II dramatic works and moves sequentially to the present day. Areas of attention include the angry young men metadrama gender race and ethnicity the new brutalism and contemporary docudrama. Particular focus on how play texts engage with the cultural and historical moment of their creation. Students gain an understanding of the scope history techniques and influence of contemporary drama. Playwrights such as John Osborne Edward Albee Eduard Bond Jose Rivera Martin McDonagh Tony Kushner Sarah Kane Suzan Lori-Parks Nilo Cruz Moises Kaufman Sarah Ruhl and others are studied. Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 and ENG 110 General Education Literature & Writing Intensive Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 3

Analytical study of the history of dramatic music especially opera and oratorio. Listening and reading assignments focus on specific composers and works as they relate to historical trends in musical style. Prerequisite PDP-150 or PDP-350 General Education Fine arts & music

Unit(s): 3

Critical examination of Shakespeares development as a dramatist and of his basic themes. Approximately 12 plays are studied. Prerequisites ENG 110 General Education Literature

Unit(s): 3

George Orwell is a major figure in the English-speaking world because of his influence on awareness of how language is used as well as his recognized achievements in nonfiction and fiction. His work is an appropriate subject of study for English majors in either the Literature Track or the Writing Track and many students have made their first acquaintance with his dystopian novels before coming to college. 1984 has been selected as a text in several sections of PDP 150 and ENG 101 and students may be interested in reading more of Orwells work to fulfill a general education requirement. Therefore a more extended study of his works in warranted in the seminar class. Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 and ENG 110 General Education Literature Writing Intensive

Unit(s): 3
(with department approval)
The internship program provides an opportunity for a student to gain field experience in an area related to the students concentration or career goals. Supervision of an intern is provided by an appropriate faculty member and by a staff member of the agency or business in which the student is an intern. A student who wishes to engage in an internship must consult with the appropriate faculty member at least eight weeks in advance of the start of the term in which the internship is to be completed. A description of the internship signed by the student and the faculty sponsor must be filed with the Director of Internships by the first day of the semester prior to the start of the internship. Approval of each application for an internship is made by the Director of Internships based upon policies and guidelines as approved by the Council on Education and the faculty. To be considered for an internship a student must have junior or senior status and at least a 2.00 grade point average. Internships are graded on an S or U basis. A student may enroll in an internship program for three credits per semester and internship credit may be earned in subsequent semesters subject to the limitations that no more than two internships may be pursued in any one agency or business and a maximum of nine credits in internships may be applied toward graduation.

Unit(s): 3

Upon approval of the Department and the Vice President and Dean of Academic Affairs a student with a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 or better may engage in an independent study or research project. One desiring to pursue independent study or research must submit a written description of the proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs by the first day of the semester in which the study is to be conducted. At the end of the semester the supervising professor files with the Registrar a grade for the student and a description of the work accomplished. Credit may be received for not more than three independent studies or research projects.

Unit(s): 3

Upon approval of the Department and the VicePresident and Dean of Academic Affairs a studentwith a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 orbetter may engage in an independent study orresearch project. One desiring to pursueindependent study or research must submit awritten description of the proposed work to thechair of the appropriate department and to theVice President and Dean for Academic Affairs bythe first day of the semester in which the studyis to be conducted. At the end of the semesterthe supervising professor files with theRegistrar a grade for the student and a description of the work accomplished. Credit may be received fornot more than three independent studies or research projects.

Unit(s): 3

An Honors Project is one in which a student researches a subject by examination of relevant literature or by experimentation or both the student reports the results in an accurately documented and well-written paper or appropriate representation of the work. Whenever the study deals with the subject of an established course the student is expected to go well beyond the usual work of the course in research and in assimilation of the results as revealed in the report. Juniors and seniors with a cumulative grade point average of 3.40 or above may register for an Honors Project. One desiring to pursue an Honors Project must submit a written description of his or her proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs by the first day of the semester in which the study is to be conducted. At the conclusion of the Honors Project the supervising professor files with the Registrar a grade for the student and a description of the work accomplished and with the Library Director a copy of the written paper or appropriate representation of the work. It is the students responsibility to provide the materials for the library in compliance with specifications approved by the Council on Education. The Library Director arranges for binding and storage.

Unit(s): 3

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Dr. Scott Cole, Associate Professor of Theatre
540-828-5687
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