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Theatre Minor

Division of Communication Studies, Fine Arts and Literature

As you minor in theatre, you’ll have the opportunity to not only study great theatrical works, but also gain hands-on experience in any aspect of stage production. Theatre faculty and students produce and direct several major productions each year.

Consists of 21 credit hours. The following courses are required:

9 credit hours of the following:

This course is an introduction to the manyelements involved in Western theatre productionwith emphases on two of the primary areas ofdesign construction and implementation sceneryand costumes and an integration with stagemanagement. The class will explore conceptstechniques equipment and materials necessary fora successful theatrical production emphasizingproblem solving through researchexperimentation and collaboration. Studentswill be challenged to engage and understand theinterrelationships between the various elementsinvolved in mounting a stage production and howthese elements relate to and affect the otheraspects of dramatic art. Previous experiencewith theatre is not necessary.Corequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350General education fine arts & music

Unit(s): 3

-or-
An introduction to the many elements involved inWestern theatre production with a special focuson stage management and emphases on two of theprimary areas of design construction andimplementation lighting and sound. The classwill explore concepts techniques equipment andmaterials necessary for a successful theatricalproduction emphasizing problem solving throughresearch experimentation and collaboration. Students will be challenged to engage andunderstand the interrelationships between thevarious elements involved in mounting a stageproduction and how these elements relate to andaffect the other aspects of dramatic art. Previous experience with theatre is notnecessary.Co-requisites PDP-150 or PDP-350

Unit(s): 3

Traces the development of dramaticart and the history of theatrical productionfrom its ritual beginnings to the EnglishRestoration. It will place dramatic art andtheatre history in context by engaging with thesocial political and cultural conditions ofspecific historical moments. Topics of study willinclude Greek Drama Roman spectacle SanskritDrama Noh Drama early Medieval religious andsecular theatre Italian commedia dellarteRenaissance and Baroque pageantry and theEnglishRestoration. The approach will be a documentaryone. Students will read specific play texts inconjunction with primary evidence both texturaland pictorial using both to illuminate thecreation and history of theatre.Corequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350General Education Fine arts and musicAlternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 3

-or-
Survey ofpost-Restoration theatrical culture history andproduction forms. Though it is a continuation ofthe World Theatre History I the student need nothave taken the previous course. Students willbegin examining theatrical history and expressionin Turkey China and Japan and move across theEuropean continent focusing on the rise ofEuropean modernity. Students will cover Romantictheatre and opera melodrama and poeticspectacleRealism Naturalism and the independent theatremovement as well as the innovation of early 20thcentury theatrical practitioners. The approachwill be a documentary one. Students will readspecific play texts in conjunction with primaryevidence textural and pictorial using both toilluminate the creation and history of theatre.Corequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350 and ENG 110General Education Fine arts & musicAlternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 3

Acting provides the student with an organized andpractical approach to acting. A systematicapproach to acting through a thorough examinationand application of Konstantin Stanislavskissystem of acting with in depth attention to thetechnique of the actor and their use of body andvoice. Textual analysis scene work monologuesauditioning performance pieces and varioustraining exercises will be used. No theatreexperience is necessary. Corequisite PDP-150 or PDP-350Alternate years offered 2017-2018FILA fine arts & music (effective 2016-17)

Unit(s): 3

-or-
This course will introduce the student to thephysical vocal and mental worlds of variousstyles and techniques of non-realisticperformance traditions. Students will experimentwith a variety of acting styles and techniquesincluding physical masked post-modernnon-western and devised performance. Thiscourse includes interfaith components of easternmeditative movement and centering practices asthey are linked to acting methods and techniques. This course is a practical expression of thetheoretical and historical. Textual analysisscene work monologues and various trainingexercises will be used. Corequisite PDP-150 or PDP-350

Unit(s): 3

3 credit hours of the following:

Production laboratory requiring intenseinvolvement with the process of translating aplay text from script to performance. Requiresthe student to work independently and as anensemble interpreting rehearsing and performinga play. Professionalism and dedication to thetheatrical process are stressed. In-class andout-of-class work is essential. May be repeatedfor credit. A maximum of 6 credits in ProductionLaboratoryApplied Performance may be appliedtoward graduation.Prerequisites Audition and permission ofinstructor

Unit(s): 1

-or-
Application of technology associated withlighting costumes and makeup scenery andproperties scenic painting technical directionand sound as associated with theatricalproduction. Requires the student to workindependently and with faculty andor guestdesigner to interpret create and implementeffective designs. Professionalism anddedication to the theatrical process arestressed. In-class and out-of-class work isessential. May be repeated for credit. A maximum of 6credits in Production LaboratoryAppliedPerformance may be applied toward graduation.Prerequisite permission of instructor.

Unit(s): 1

-or-
Application of techniques associated with stagemanagement dramaturgy and assistant directingas associated with theatrical production. Requires the student to work independently andwith faculty andor guest artists to interpretcreate and implement effective theatricalperformances. Professionalism and dedication to the theatricalprocess are stressed. In-class and out-of-classwork is essential. May be repeated for credit. A maximum of 6 credits in ProductionLaboratoryApplied Performance may be appliedtoward graduation.Prerequisites permission of instructor

Unit(s): 1

An additional 9 credit hours must be chosen from the following courses:

Theatre Practice and Design:

A studio project-based introduction to theelements and principles of 2-D and 3-D design invisual art and communication contexts. Emphasisis on visual problem solving mastery of visualdesign principles technical proficiency andcritical analysis of how visual imagescommunicate. This course provides a foundationfor students planning to take advanced courses inany art media and other fields in which visualimagery plays an important role. As a stand-alonecourse Art 120 provides critical and practicalskills related to visual communication.

Unit(s): 3

A studio based exploration of drawing fromobservation using basic materials like graphiteand charcoal. This course investigates drawing asa process generating and critically evaluatingvisual ideas as well as producing visual imagery.Art 130 is a foundation course for studentsplanning to take advanced art courses in anymedium. As a stand-alone this course buildspractical and theoretical skills in seeing andmaking the 2-D images we call drawings. Corequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350General Education fine arts & music

Unit(s): 3

A project based investigation of the materialspractices and aesthetics of painting withemphasis on how these three elements worktogether to create compelling 2-D colored images.This course provides practical and theoreticalfoundations for four hundred-level courses indrawing and painting and for independent work inthese media.Corequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350General Education fine arts and music

Unit(s): 3

Produce short videos using digital cameras andediting software. Emphasis is placed ondeveloping skills in camera operation lightingaudio and editing and development of effectivenarrative structure and non-fiction storytelling.Note Students must provide a DSLR or compactcamera capable of HD video capture and externalhard drive appropriate for video editing. Corequisite COMM 100General Education fine arts and music

Unit(s): 3

Emphasis on factors influencing fashion includingthe sociological psychological and physiologicalaspects of clothing and basic construction ofclothing.

Unit(s): 3

No musical experience required. An introductionto reading music scales key signaturesintervals rhythms instruments and score study.Hands-on musical activities include eurhythmicssinging and the playing of simple percussive andmelodic instruments. Serves as a prerequisite tosome courses in music students may place out ofthis course by passing the music fundamentalsdiagnostic test.Corequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350General education fine arts & music

Unit(s): 3

-or-
Diatonic harmony voice leading and phrasestructure. Aural skills include sight singing andmelodic dictation.Prerequisites MUS 110

Unit(s): 3

This course is an introduction to the manyelements involved in Western theatre productionwith emphases on two of the primary areas ofdesign construction and implementation sceneryand costumes and an integration with stagemanagement. The class will explore conceptstechniques equipment and materials necessary fora successful theatrical production emphasizingproblem solving through researchexperimentation and collaboration. Studentswill be challenged to engage and understand theinterrelationships between the various elementsinvolved in mounting a stage production and howthese elements relate to and affect the otheraspects of dramatic art. Previous experiencewith theatre is not necessary.Corequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350General education fine arts & music

Unit(s): 3

-or-
An introduction to the many elements involved inWestern theatre production with a special focuson stage management and emphases on two of theprimary areas of design construction andimplementation lighting and sound. The classwill explore concepts techniques equipment andmaterials necessary for a successful theatricalproduction emphasizing problem solving throughresearch experimentation and collaboration. Students will be challenged to engage andunderstand the interrelationships between thevarious elements involved in mounting a stageproduction and how these elements relate to andaffect the other aspects of dramatic art. Previous experience with theatre is notnecessary.Co-requisites PDP-150 or PDP-350

Unit(s): 3

A study of specific topics related to theatreincluding Movement for the PerformerPlaywriting Set Design Lighting Design andCostume Design. May be taken more than onceprovided different topics are covered. Corequisite PDP-150 or PDP-350 General Education Fine Arts and Music &Experiential Learning

Unit(s): 3

Practical study of the various theoriestechniques and materials used in scenic painting.Focusing on theory and practice encompasses asystematic approach to painting theatricalscenery. Emphasis on traditional scene paintingtechniques including material selection (brushesand paints) and their practical applicationthrough design reproductions and faux finishesas well as the tools and paints that have beendeveloped to support those techniques. Studentslearn how the theories and techniques of scenicpainting have changed historically and how theseunique changes have impacted the materials andtechniques utilized by the scenic painter.Engages with the unique qualities of differenttypes of paint noting how they perform ondifferent types of materials and how thatknowledge can be used to create effectiveresults. Projects include painting stage dropscreating stained glass windows with paint fauxmarble and wood grain finishes photos anddesigner renderings. This course carries a 25materials fee.Corequisites PDP-150 or PDP-350General education fine arts and music

Unit(s): 3

An exploration of the rich and varied theatricalscenes in London through nightly attendance atprofessional and nonprofessional productions.The group attends professional West Endclassical modern and musical productions. Amusic hall performance and holiday pantomime aswell as lively nonprofessional theatre in theLondon suburbs are on the itinerary. Daytimebackstage tours and visits to the Theatre Museumand other locations of theatrical historicaland cultural interests complement the experienceas do side-trips to Stratford-upon-Avon andOxford.Offered on demand.Corequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350General education fine arts and musicEstimated Extra Cost 3500Offered on demand

Unit(s): 3

THEA-340
The internship program provides an opportunityfora student to gain field experience in an arearelated to the students concentration or careergoals. Supervision of an intern is provided byanappropriate faculty member and by a staff memberof the agency or business in which the student isan intern. A student who wishes to engage in aninternship must consult with the appropriatefaculty member at least eight weeks in advance ofthe start of the term in which the internship isto be completed. A description of theinternshipsigned by the student and the faculty sponsormust be filed with the Director of Internships bythe first day of the semester prior to the startof the internship. Approval of each applicationfor an internship is made by the Director ofInternships based upon policies and guidelines asapproved by the Council on Education and thefaculty. To be considered for an internship astudent must have junior or senior status and atleast a 2.00 grade point average. Internshipsaregraded on an S or U basis. A student may enrollin an internship program for three credits persemester and internship credit may be earned insubsequent semesters subject to the limitationsthat no more than two internships may be pursuedin any one agency or business and a maximum ofnine credits in internships may be applied towardgraduation.

Unit(s): 3

Upon approval of the Department and the VicePresident and Dean of Academic Affairs a studentwith a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 orbetter may engage in an independent study orresearch project. One desiring to pursueindependent study or research must submit awritten description of the proposed work to thechair of the appropriate department and to theVice President and Dean for Academic Affairs bythe first day of the semester in which the studyis to be conducted. At the end of the semesterthe supervising professor files with the Registrara grade for the student and a description of thework accomplished. Credit may be received for notmore than three independent studies or researchprojects.

Unit(s): 3

Upon approval of the Department and the VicePresident and Dean of Academic Affairs a studentwith a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 orbetter may engage in an independent study orresearch project. One desiring to pursueindependent study or research must submit awritten description of the proposed work to thechair of the appropriate department and to theVice President and Dean for Academic Affairs bythe first day of the semester in which the studyis to be conducted. At the end of the semesterthe supervising professor files with theRegistrara grade for the student and a description of thework accomplished. Credit may be received fornotmore than three independent studies or researchprojects.

Unit(s): 3

THEA-499

History, Theory and Criticism:

Select 1 course (3 credit hours) from list below or other course(s) approved by department.

Environmental theatre began in the 1960s inresponse to the social and political climate ofthe time. Performers and performance groupspushedthe boundaries of what was traditionally thoughtof as theatre and as a result restructured andreinvigorated the fundamental understanding ofwhat performance was and its function withinsociety. Environmental theatre continues to bea powerful vehicle for social commentary. Theobjective of this course is three-fold tointroduce the student to the cultural socialandpolitical richness of environmental theatreincluding site-specific performance to provide ahistorical understanding of the period byhighlighting how the original practitioners andtheir works were directly influenced by culturalevents of the time and to involve the studentinthe process of creating and performing their ownindividual and group site-specific environmentalperformance piece.Corequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350General Education Fine arts and music

Unit(s): 3

THEA/
Examination of theatrical literature and formsfrom the late 19th century well-made playsRealism Expressionism Futurism and Symbolismto Epic theatre and the Theatre of the Absurd.Playwrights such as Henrik Ibsen Bernard ShawAnton Chekhov Eugene ONeill Bertolt BrechtSamuel Beckett and others will be studied. Thegoals of this course are for students to gain anunderstanding of the scope history techniquesand influence of Modern Drama.Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 and ENG 110General Education Literature & Writing IntensiveAlternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 3

THEA/
Contemporary theatrical forms of American andBritish drama. Begins with post-World War IIdramatic works and moves sequentially to thepresent day. Areas of attention include theangry young men metadrama gender race andethnicity the new brutalism and contemporarydocudrama. Particular focus on how play textsengage with the cultural and historical moment oftheir creation. Students gain an understanding ofthe scope history techniques and influence ofcontemporary drama. Playwrights such as JohnOsborne Edward Albee Eduard Bond Jose RiveraMartin McDonagh Tony Kushner Sarah Kane SuzanLori-Parks Nilo Cruz Moises Kaufman Sarah Ruhland others are studied.Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 and ENG 110General Education Literature & Writing IntensiveAlternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 3

Analytical study of the history of dramaticmusicespecially opera and oratorio. Listening andreading assignments focus on specific composersand works as they relate to historical trends inmusical style.Prerequisite
Taught in the style of a seminar a small groupof students learn thinking skills throughdiscussion debate peer review andbrainstorming. Context varies from section tosection. Incoming students rank topic preferencesand then are assigned to a section. Focusesspecifically on two key areas of personaldevelopment (1) intellectual growth isstimulated through systematic criticalquestioning and (2) a sense of communityinvolvement and responsibility is developedthrough classroom group work collaborativelearning and a class community engagementproject. The course also contains success skillexercises and college orientation informationincluding an introduction to the portfolioprogram.General education master core skills2017 Fall Semester TopicsPDP-150-01 A Mans Man and a Womans WomanPDP-150-02 The Power of Physical Activity andSportPDP-150-03 Human Behavior in a Computational AgePDP-150-04 Strange IdeasPDP-150-05 After the ScourgePDP-150-06 Swimming in a sea of misinformationPDP-150-07 A Mans Man and a Womans WomanPDP-150-08 Creativity in the Arts SciencesBusiness Sports... in LifePDP-150-09 How to Rock the BoatPDP-150-10 Superhero NarrativesPDP-150-11 Dog is My Co-PilotPDP-150-12 Leadership and the Art of DecisionPDP-150-13 Free PlayPDP-150-14 Knowledge The Only FrontierPDP-150-15 Music Sweet Music PDP-150-16 The Fine Line between Glory & GuiltPDP-150-17 The Souls of Black Folk CriticalReadings By and About African Americans in the20th and 21st CenturiesPDP-150-18 Whos Sorry Now Thinking ThroughApologies Made on the Public StagePDP-150-19 Chickens Chickens ChickensPDP-150-20 The Narnian The Life and Imaginationof C.S. LewisPDP-150-21 Liberal Arts of the Living DeadPDP-150-22 Liberal Arts of the Living DeadPDP-150-23 Human Behavior in a Computational AgePDP-150-24 Latino USAPDP-150-25 Tweet Friend Pin Social Media &You as a 21st Century CitizenPDP-150-26 The Power of Physical Activity andSportPDP-150-29 Free PlayPDP-150-30 Media Narratives Spinning the Truth

Unit(s): 3
or
An introduction to the academic community ofBridgewater College to the liberal arts and tothe skills of critical thinking and reflectivewriting specifically designed for transferstudents. Transfer students will explore theunique challenges of integrating into a liberalarts educational environment and will begin theprocess of documenting their experiences andgrowth in the four dimensions of personaldevelopment intellectual growth and discoverycitizenship and community responsibility ethicaland spiritual growth and emotional maturationandphysical health.general education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
General Education Fine arts & musicEstimated Extra Cost 3800

Unit(s): 3
X
Critical examination of Shakespearesdevelopment as a dramatist and of his basicthemes. Approximately 12 plays are studied.Prerequisites ENG 110General Education Literature

Unit(s): 3

ENG-400 (with department approval)
The internship program provides an opportunityfora student to gain field experience in an arearelated to the students concentration or careergoals. Supervision of an intern is provided byanappropriate faculty member and by a staff memberof the agency or business in which the student isan intern. A student who wishes to engage in aninternship must consult with the appropriatefaculty member at least eight weeks in advance ofthe start of the term in which the internship isto be completed. A description of theinternshipsigned by the student and the faculty sponsormust be filed with the Director of Internships bythe first day of the semester prior to the startof the internship. Approval of each applicationfor an internship is made by the Director ofInternships based upon policies and guidelines asapproved by the Council on Education and thefaculty. To be considered for an internship astudent must have junior or senior status and atleast a 2.00 grade point average. Internshipsaregraded on an S or U basis. A student may enrollin an internship program for three credits persemester and internship credit may be earned insubsequent semesters subject to the limitationsthat no more than two internships may be pursuedin any one agency or business and a maximum ofnine credits in internships may be applied towardgraduation.

Unit(s): 3

Upon approval of the Department and the VicePresident and Dean of Academic Affairs a studentwith a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 orbetter may engage in an independent study orresearch project. One desiring to pursueindependent study or research must submit awritten description of the proposed work to thechair of the appropriate department and to theVice President and Dean for Academic Affairs bythe first day of the semester in which the studyis to be conducted. At the end of the semesterthe supervising professor files with the Registrara grade for the student and a description of thework accomplished. Credit may be received for notmore than three independent studies or researchprojects.

Unit(s): 3

Upon approval of the Department and the VicePresident and Dean of Academic Affairs a studentwith a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 orbetter may engage in an independent study orresearch project. One desiring to pursueindependent study or research must submit awritten description of the proposed work to thechair of the appropriate department and to theVice President and Dean for Academic Affairs bythe first day of the semester in which the studyis to be conducted. At the end of the semesterthe supervising professor files with theRegistrara grade for the student and a description of thework accomplished. Credit may be received fornotmore than three independent studies or researchprojects.

Unit(s): 3

THEA-49

 

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Dr. Scott Cole, Associate Professor of Theatre
540-828-5687
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