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Kickstart Your Career in Medicine, Health, Research and more!

Biology Major

Division of Natural Sciences

Your future is bright with a biology degree from Bridgewater College.

Advances in cell biology, molecular genetics and ecology mean that well-prepared biologists are always in demand. Bridgewater alumni have become successful physicians, research scientists, veterinarians, medical technologists, environmental lawyers, dentists, physical therapists, genetic counselors and forestry and wildlife specialists.

You’ll take a core of biology courses covering organismal biology, genetics, molecular biology, physiology, ecology and evolution. Then you can develop depth in any area of interest through upper-level classes and research.

Perform independent research projects  during the semester or the summer to apply what you’ve learned hands-on, with guidance from faculty mentors.

You can also add an emphasis (area of focus) to add depth to the major. Choose from environmental chemistry, freshwater resources and wildlife biology.

Biology Major

Consists of a minimum of 43 credit hours of courses in biology, chemistry and mathematics. Students choose one of three tracks: General Biology, Pre-Health Sciences, or Ecology. The following core courses are required for each track, consisting of 26 credits:

Introduction to the biological sciences coveringbiological chemistry celltissue structure andfunction genetics and microevolution. Intendedfor biology health and human sciences andenvironmental science majors. Three lectures andone lab per week.Corequisites
Real numbers exponents radicals and algebraicoperations with polynomial and rationalfunctions.Solving equations and graphing expressionsinvolving polynomial and rational functions andexponential and logarithmic functions.Credit may not be received for both MATH 118 and110.General education master core skill2017 Summer Session I offered as an online course

Unit(s): 3
or
This course is designed to provide development ofbasic computational skills and introductoryalgebra concepts like solutions of singlevariable equations. It will also cover someintroductory statistics and probability concepts.Problem solving will be emphasized. The coursewill contain at least one project that requiresstudents to make extensive use of spreadsheetsoftware like Excel.General Education Master Core Skill

Unit(s): 3
Biology and environmental science majors shouldtake
Real numbers exponents radicals and algebraicoperations with polynomial and rationalfunctions.Solving equations and graphing expressionsinvolving polynomial and rational functions andexponential and logarithmic functions.Credit may not be received for both MATH 118 and110.General education master core skill2017 Summer Session I offered as an online course

Unit(s): 3
. Other students should consultwith their advisor about which course to take. General Education natural and physical sciences

Unit(s): 4

Introduction to the biological sciencescovering macroevolution (systematic taxonomyphylogenetics) ecology and biodiversity.Intended for biology and environmental sciencemajors. Three lectures and one lab per week.Prerequisites BIOL 110

Unit(s): 4

Introduction to both classical Mendelianinheritance and molecular genetics with one labper week.Prerequisites BIOL 111 or permission ofinstructor CHEM 161 recommendedBIOL-216 may not be substituted for BIOL-309

Unit(s): 4

Examination of the mechanisms of biologicalevolution including mutation natural selectiongenetic drift nonrandom mating the geneticstructure of species populations the origin ofnew species and DNA evidence regardingrelationships among species and higher taxa.Prerequisites BIOL-309
Differential and integral calculus for thestudentwho needs a working knowledge of the subjectbut does not plan to pursue more advanced studyin mathematics. Includes theory and applicationof limits derivatives and integrals.Prerequisite MATH 120 or satisfactoryperformance on placement testCredit may not be received for both MATH 130 andMATH 131

Unit(s): 3
and seniorstanding or permission of instructor

Unit(s): 3

Principles of chemistry including stoichiometrystates of matter atomic and molecular structurechemical bonding periodicity energyrelationships and equilibria acid-basechemistry electrochemistry kineticssolubilitythermodynamics kinetic molecular theory ofgases and the systematic study of families ofelements. Three hours of lecture and onefour-hourlaboratory per week.Prerequisite MATH 110 MATH 115 or MATH 118General Education natural and physicalsciencesCredit may not be received for both CHEM 125 and161

Unit(s): 4

Principles of chemistry including stoichiometrystates of matter atomic and molecular structurechemical bonding periodicity energyrelationships and equilibria acid-basechemistryelectrochemistry kinetics solubilitythermodynamics kinetic molecular theory ofgasesand the systematic study of families of elements.Three hours of lecture and one four-hourlab per week.Prerequisites CHEM 161 or permission of theinstructorGeneral Education natural and physicalsciencesCredit may not be received for both CHEM 125 and161

Unit(s): 4

Differential and integral calculus for thestudentwho needs a working knowledge of the subjectbut does not plan to pursue more advanced studyin mathematics. Includes theory and applicationof limits derivatives and integrals.Prerequisite MATH 120 or satisfactoryperformance on placement testCredit may not be received for both MATH 130 andMATH 131

Unit(s): 3

The remaining credits come from the tracks as follows—students choose one:

Track 1-General Biology

Consists of 17 to 20 credits chosen from the following:

Cell Biology/Physiology (1 course)

Introduction to animal physiology - how animalsfunction at cellular systems and organismallevels. Knowledge that is acquired in this courseserves as an excellent foundation for futurepostgraduate or professional studies in animalhealth & management. Course structure activelearning lectures and applied learning labs.Development of scientific thinking and writingare significant components of the course.Prerequisites
Taught in the style of a seminar a small groupof students learn thinking skills throughdiscussion debate peer review andbrainstorming. Context varies from section tosection. Incoming students rank topic preferencesand then are assigned to a section. Focusesspecifically on two key areas of personaldevelopment (1) intellectual growth isstimulated through systematic criticalquestioning and (2) a sense of communityinvolvement and responsibility is developedthrough classroom group work collaborativelearning and a class community engagementproject. The course also contains success skillexercises and college orientation informationincluding an introduction to the portfolioprogram.General education master core skills2017 Fall Semester TopicsPDP-150-01 A Mans Man and a Womans WomanPDP-150-02 The Power of Physical Activity andSportPDP-150-03 Human Behavior in a Computational AgePDP-150-04 Strange IdeasPDP-150-05 After the ScourgePDP-150-06 Swimming in a sea of misinformationPDP-150-07 A Mans Man and a Womans WomanPDP-150-08 Creativity in the Arts SciencesBusiness Sports... in LifePDP-150-09 How to Rock the BoatPDP-150-10 Superhero NarrativesPDP-150-11 Dog is My Co-PilotPDP-150-12 Leadership and the Art of DecisionPDP-150-13 Free PlayPDP-150-14 Knowledge The Only FrontierPDP-150-15 Music Sweet Music PDP-150-16 The Fine Line between Glory & GuiltPDP-150-17 The Souls of Black Folk CriticalReadings By and About African Americans in the20th and 21st CenturiesPDP-150-18 Whos Sorry Now Thinking ThroughApologies Made on the Public StagePDP-150-19 Chickens Chickens ChickensPDP-150-20 The Narnian The Life and Imaginationof C.S. LewisPDP-150-21 Liberal Arts of the Living DeadPDP-150-22 Liberal Arts of the Living DeadPDP-150-23 Human Behavior in a Computational AgePDP-150-24 Latino USAPDP-150-25 Tweet Friend Pin Social Media &You as a 21st Century CitizenPDP-150-26 The Power of Physical Activity andSportPDP-150-29 Free PlayPDP-150-30 Media Narratives Spinning the Truth

Unit(s): 3
or
An introduction to the academic community ofBridgewater College to the liberal arts and tothe skills of critical thinking and reflectivewriting specifically designed for transferstudents. Transfer students will explore theunique challenges of integrating into a liberalarts educational environment and will begin theprocess of documenting their experiences andgrowth in the four dimensions of personaldevelopment intellectual growth and discoverycitizenship and community responsibility ethicaland spiritual growth and emotional maturationandphysical health.general education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
Introduction to academic expository andargumentative writing with a focus on developingrhetorical skills and practices appropriate to arange of disciplines. Instruction in ethical useof material from sources and academicdocumentation systems. Supplementary writersworkshop required based on placement.General Education 2014 master core skill

Unit(s): 3
BIOL-110 and BIOL-111
A precalculus course for students continuing inmathematics. Includes topics in algebrafunctionsand relations and trigonometry.Prerequisites MATH 110 or satisfactoryperformance on placement test

Unit(s): 3
FILA general education writing intensive

Unit(s): 4

Introduction to the physiology of the human bodyincluding the physiology of enzymes andmembranes tissue physiology (nervous muscular)and a detailed survey of the physiology of themajor organ systems. Three lectures and one labper week.Prerequisites BIOL 111 or BIOL 110 and 305Credit may not be received for both BIOL 311 and314

Unit(s): 4

The molecular basis of cell structure andfunction. Topics include the chemistryarchitecture and analysis of macromoleculesoverview of thermodynamics and metabolismenzymology genetic processes and controlsrecombinant DNA technology and cell signalingmechanisms. Three lectures and one lab perweek.Prerequisites BIOL 111 and CHEM 161 orpermission of instructorCredit may not be received for both BIOL-216 andBIOL-325

Unit(s): 4

Ecology (1 course)

Analysis of the distribution and abundance oforganisms population growth and regulation andspecies interactions as well as community andecosystem processes. Three lectures and onelab per week.Prerequisites BIOL 111 and MATH 1302016 Summer Session I Begins 5-23-16

Unit(s): 4

BIOL/
An exploration of how microorganisms interactwiththeir environment and the implications of theseinteractions for humans. Specific topics willinclude antibiotic resistance biodegradationbiodiversity biofuels bioremediation extremeenvironments geochemical cycles methods forsampling culture and analysis of environmentalmicroorganisms microbiology of air water andsoil environmental pathogens andmicrobiologicaltreatment of sewage and water. Three lectures andone lab per week.Prerequisites BIOL 309 or ENVRCHEM 320Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

BIOL/
An introduction to aquatic ecosystems (lakesponds streams and wetlands). Students will learnabout the major chemical and physical processesthat determine the function of freshwatersystems. Students will be introduced to the majorgroups of aquatic organisms (algae vascularplants invertebrates and fish). Includes strongemphasis on the impacts that humans have onfreshwater systems. The lab will introduce thebasic skills necessary for the study andmanagement of fresh waters.Prerequisite ENVRBIOL 301 or BIOL 350 orpermission of the instructorAlternate years offered 2015-2016

Unit(s): 4

Organismal Biology (1 course)

Explores the anatomy physiology ecology andbehaviors that have produced an extraordinarybiodiversity of bird species. The major groups ofmodern birds are introduced and their originand ecology are examined. Students learnto recognize local species in the field andexamine them in the lab using the ornithologycollections. Suitable for bothbiology majors and non-majors.Prerequisites BIOL 100 or 110Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

Introduction to developmental biology witha focus on its fundamental aspectsembryogenesis growth cellular differentiationand morphogenesis. The study of theory issupplemented with hands-on observations of earlydevelopment in animal embryos (salamander andormouse or other animals). We also considerthe impact of recent advances in developmentalbiology on our society by exploring the ethicalmoral and religious implications as well as thelegal issues that inevitably arise from work inthis field.Prerequisites BIOL 111 and one additionalBIOL course numbered 200 or aboveAlternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 3

An introduction to the study of amphibians andreptiles. Lectures will focus on the origin andevolution of amphibians and reptiles and ontheir biology ecology and conservation. Lab willemphasize taxonomy anatomy speciesidentification and common field techniques usedto study these groups.Prerequisite BIOL 111Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

A comprehensive survey of mammals. Lectures willfocus on phylogenetics the origin and evolutionof mammals and their biology ecology andconservation. Lab will emphasize taxonomyspecies identification and common fieldtechniques used to study mammals.Prerequisite BIOL 111Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

A comprehensive survey of the plant kingdom thatwill include topics ranging from plant anatomyphysiology diversity and ecology. Studentsinterested in ecology forestry and wildlifebiology will find this course particularlyuseful. Three lectures and one lab per week.Prerequisite BIOL 111Alternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 4

Introductory survey of microbiology with anemphasis on bacteriology. The lecture componentcovers the structure nutrition metabolism andgenetics of microbes medical microbiologydiagnostic techniques microbial ecology andindustrial microbiology. The lab componentincludes biological safety microscopy culturetechniques media staining identification ofunknown bacteria and an independent researchproject. Two lectures and two labs perweek.Prerequisites BIOL 309 or permission ofinstructor BIOL 325 recommended

Unit(s): 4

Exploration of major human pathogens includingviruses bacteria fungi protozoa andhelminths.Topics include host-parasite interactions hostdefenses pathogenic mechanisms control ofmicroorganisms diagnosis and identification ofinfectious agents antibiotic therapy diseasetransmission and epidemiology. Class activitiesinclude discussion of medical case studiesliterature analysis identification of unknownsand field trips. Three lectures and onelab per week.Prerequisite BIOL-309 or permission ofinstructor BIOL-325 and BIOL-400 stronglyrecommended)

Unit(s): 4

Broad survey of the diversity andclassification of vascular plants. Students willlearn to recognize common and important plantfamilies as well as learn to identify local taxa.Traditional and modern methods of taxonomy andsystematics are presented.Prerequisite BIOL 111 BIOL 430 recommendedAlternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 4

BIOL/
A survey of diversity of fish (with an emphasison freshwater fish of North America). Topics willinclude taxonomy anatomy physiology behaviorand ecology. There will be special emphasis onmanagement of fish populations and diversityin the face of environmental threats includingpollution habitat alteration overharvest andinvasive species. Lab will include basic ecologyand behavior but will focus heavily on commonfisheries techniques.Prerequisite ENVRBIOL 301 or BIOL 350 orpermission of the instructorAlternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 4

Introduction to the theoreticalframework and the methodology of animal behaviorresearch. Students examine the causationdevelopment current function and evolutionaryhistory of behavior of invertebrates andvertebrates. Integrates concepts and principlesfrom multipledisciplines to understand behaviors such asforaging and predation mating systemscommunication parental care social hierarchiesand territoriality. Students also review thehistory of the field of animal behavior and thecontributions that animal behavior research canmake to applied disciplines such as environmentalconservation biomedical research and humanpsychology.Prerequisites Any one of the following BIOL311 314 or 350 PSY 210 or permission of theinstructorAlternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

And 2 elective BIOL courses numbered 300 or higher

Track 2-Pre-Health Sciences

Consists of 18 to 20 credits chosen from the following:

Cell Biology (1 course)

The molecular basis of cell structure andfunction. Topics include the chemistryarchitecture and analysis of macromoleculesoverview of thermodynamics and metabolismenzymology genetic processes and controlsrecombinant DNA technology and cell signalingmechanisms. Three lectures and one lab perweek.Prerequisites BIOL 111 and CHEM 161 orpermission of instructorCredit may not be received for both BIOL-216 andBIOL-325

Unit(s): 4

Physiology (1 course)

Introduction to animal physiology - how animalsfunction at cellular systems and organismallevels. Knowledge that is acquired in this courseserves as an excellent foundation for futurepostgraduate or professional studies in animalhealth & management. Course structure activelearning lectures and applied learning labs.Development of scientific thinking and writingare significant components of the course.Prerequisites
Taught in the style of a seminar a small groupof students learn thinking skills throughdiscussion debate peer review andbrainstorming. Context varies from section tosection. Incoming students rank topic preferencesand then are assigned to a section. Focusesspecifically on two key areas of personaldevelopment (1) intellectual growth isstimulated through systematic criticalquestioning and (2) a sense of communityinvolvement and responsibility is developedthrough classroom group work collaborativelearning and a class community engagementproject. The course also contains success skillexercises and college orientation informationincluding an introduction to the portfolioprogram.General education master core skills2017 Fall Semester TopicsPDP-150-01 A Mans Man and a Womans WomanPDP-150-02 The Power of Physical Activity andSportPDP-150-03 Human Behavior in a Computational AgePDP-150-04 Strange IdeasPDP-150-05 After the ScourgePDP-150-06 Swimming in a sea of misinformationPDP-150-07 A Mans Man and a Womans WomanPDP-150-08 Creativity in the Arts SciencesBusiness Sports... in LifePDP-150-09 How to Rock the BoatPDP-150-10 Superhero NarrativesPDP-150-11 Dog is My Co-PilotPDP-150-12 Leadership and the Art of DecisionPDP-150-13 Free PlayPDP-150-14 Knowledge The Only FrontierPDP-150-15 Music Sweet Music PDP-150-16 The Fine Line between Glory & GuiltPDP-150-17 The Souls of Black Folk CriticalReadings By and About African Americans in the20th and 21st CenturiesPDP-150-18 Whos Sorry Now Thinking ThroughApologies Made on the Public StagePDP-150-19 Chickens Chickens ChickensPDP-150-20 The Narnian The Life and Imaginationof C.S. LewisPDP-150-21 Liberal Arts of the Living DeadPDP-150-22 Liberal Arts of the Living DeadPDP-150-23 Human Behavior in a Computational AgePDP-150-24 Latino USAPDP-150-25 Tweet Friend Pin Social Media &You as a 21st Century CitizenPDP-150-26 The Power of Physical Activity andSportPDP-150-29 Free PlayPDP-150-30 Media Narratives Spinning the Truth

Unit(s): 3
or
An introduction to the academic community ofBridgewater College to the liberal arts and tothe skills of critical thinking and reflectivewriting specifically designed for transferstudents. Transfer students will explore theunique challenges of integrating into a liberalarts educational environment and will begin theprocess of documenting their experiences andgrowth in the four dimensions of personaldevelopment intellectual growth and discoverycitizenship and community responsibility ethicaland spiritual growth and emotional maturationandphysical health.general education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
Introduction to academic expository andargumentative writing with a focus on developingrhetorical skills and practices appropriate to arange of disciplines. Instruction in ethical useof material from sources and academicdocumentation systems. Supplementary writersworkshop required based on placement.General Education 2014 master core skill

Unit(s): 3
BIOL-110 and BIOL-111
A precalculus course for students continuing inmathematics. Includes topics in algebrafunctionsand relations and trigonometry.Prerequisites MATH 110 or satisfactoryperformance on placement test

Unit(s): 3
FILA general education writing intensive

Unit(s): 4

Introduction to the physiology of the human bodyincluding the physiology of enzymes andmembranes tissue physiology (nervous muscular)and a detailed survey of the physiology of themajor organ systems. Three lectures and one labper week.Prerequisites BIOL 111 or BIOL 110 and 305Credit may not be received for both BIOL 311 and314

Unit(s): 4

Ecology (1 course)

Analysis of the distribution and abundance oforganisms population growth and regulation andspecies interactions as well as community andecosystem processes. Three lectures and onelab per week.Prerequisites BIOL 111 and MATH 1302016 Summer Session I Begins 5-23-16

Unit(s): 4

BIOL/
An exploration of how microorganisms interactwiththeir environment and the implications of theseinteractions for humans. Specific topics willinclude antibiotic resistance biodegradationbiodiversity biofuels bioremediation extremeenvironments geochemical cycles methods forsampling culture and analysis of environmentalmicroorganisms microbiology of air water andsoil environmental pathogens andmicrobiologicaltreatment of sewage and water. Three lectures andone lab per week.Prerequisites BIOL 309 or ENVRCHEM 320Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

Organismal Biology (1 course)

Introduction to developmental biology witha focus on its fundamental aspectsembryogenesis growth cellular differentiationand morphogenesis. The study of theory issupplemented with hands-on observations of earlydevelopment in animal embryos (salamander andormouse or other animals). We also considerthe impact of recent advances in developmentalbiology on our society by exploring the ethicalmoral and religious implications as well as thelegal issues that inevitably arise from work inthis field.Prerequisites BIOL 111 and one additionalBIOL course numbered 200 or aboveAlternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 3

A comprehensive survey of mammals. Lectures willfocus on phylogenetics the origin and evolutionof mammals and their biology ecology andconservation. Lab will emphasize taxonomyspecies identification and common fieldtechniques used to study mammals.Prerequisite BIOL 111Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

Introductory survey of microbiology with anemphasis on bacteriology. The lecture componentcovers the structure nutrition metabolism andgenetics of microbes medical microbiologydiagnostic techniques microbial ecology andindustrial microbiology. The lab componentincludes biological safety microscopy culturetechniques media staining identification ofunknown bacteria and an independent researchproject. Two lectures and two labs perweek.Prerequisites BIOL 309 or permission ofinstructor BIOL 325 recommended

Unit(s): 4

Exploration of major human pathogens includingviruses bacteria fungi protozoa andhelminths.Topics include host-parasite interactions hostdefenses pathogenic mechanisms control ofmicroorganisms diagnosis and identification ofinfectious agents antibiotic therapy diseasetransmission and epidemiology. Class activitiesinclude discussion of medical case studiesliterature analysis identification of unknownsand field trips. Three lectures and onelab per week.Prerequisite BIOL-309 or permission ofinstructor BIOL-325 and BIOL-400 stronglyrecommended)

Unit(s): 4

Introduction to the theoreticalframework and the methodology of animal behaviorresearch. Students examine the causationdevelopment current function and evolutionaryhistory of behavior of invertebrates andvertebrates. Integrates concepts and principlesfrom multipledisciplines to understand behaviors such asforaging and predation mating systemscommunication parental care social hierarchiesand territoriality. Students also review thehistory of the field of animal behavior and thecontributions that animal behavior research canmake to applied disciplines such as environmentalconservation biomedical research and humanpsychology.Prerequisites Any one of the following BIOL311 314 or 350 PSY 210 or permission of theinstructorAlternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

Pre-Health (1 elective)

Introduction to the structure and function of thehuman body examining the skeletal muscularcirculatory nervous digestive respiratoryurinary and reproductive systems. Lecture focuseson topics of physiologyfunction histology andtheir relation to anatomical structure while thelab focuses on descriptive anatomy. Threelectures and one lab per week.Prerequisites BIOL 110 or permissionof instructor2016 Summer Session I Begins 5-23-16

Unit(s): 4

Introduction to nutrition and digestion indomestic animals designed primarily for studentsin the pre-veterinary program. Topics include major nutrient classes and theirfunctions in the body feed classification andchemical analysis feed processing and nutrientrequirements.Prerequisites BIOL 111Alternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 3

Development of immune responses through humoraland cell-mediated mechanisms transplantation andtumor immunology hypersensitivity reactionsautoimmunity and serology. Three lectures andone lab per week.Prerequisites BIOL 325 or permission ofinstructorAlternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 4

Comparative study of the major organ systems invertebrate animals. Lectures examine topics suchas the origin and adaptive evolution ofvertebrate anatomy and the systematicrelationships between vertebrate groups. The labprovides a detailed examination of vertebrateanatomy. Three lectures and one lab per week.Prerequisite BIOL 111Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

BIOL/
Introduction to the major biomolecular compoundclasses including carbohydrates proteinslipids and nucleic acids along with a survey ofenzyme kinetics and the overall regulation of keymetabolic pathways. Three lectures per week.Prerequisite CHEM-250 or CHEM-306310

Unit(s): 3

-or-
BIOL/
Introduction to the major biomolecular compoundclasses including carbohydrates proteinslipids and nucleic acids along with a survey ofenzyme kinetics and the overall regulation of keymetabolic pathways. Three lectures and one labper week.Prerequisite CHEM-250 or CHEM-306310

Unit(s): 4

BIOL/
A continuation of the topics covered inBiochemistry I with special attention paid tothe classic chemical reactions at work inbiological systems. The intersection ofbiochemical principles with such applications asdrug discovery and computational modeling will beemphasized as a mechanism for understanding thefundamental relationship between structure andfunction. Three lectures per week.Prerequisite BIOLCHEM-355 or 356

Unit(s): 3

Track 3-Ecology

Consists of 17 to 20 credits chosen from the following:

Cell Biology/Physiology (1 course)

Introduction to animal physiology - how animalsfunction at cellular systems and organismallevels. Knowledge that is acquired in this courseserves as an excellent foundation for futurepostgraduate or professional studies in animalhealth & management. Course structure activelearning lectures and applied learning labs.Development of scientific thinking and writingare significant components of the course.Prerequisites
Taught in the style of a seminar a small groupof students learn thinking skills throughdiscussion debate peer review andbrainstorming. Context varies from section tosection. Incoming students rank topic preferencesand then are assigned to a section. Focusesspecifically on two key areas of personaldevelopment (1) intellectual growth isstimulated through systematic criticalquestioning and (2) a sense of communityinvolvement and responsibility is developedthrough classroom group work collaborativelearning and a class community engagementproject. The course also contains success skillexercises and college orientation informationincluding an introduction to the portfolioprogram.General education master core skills2017 Fall Semester TopicsPDP-150-01 A Mans Man and a Womans WomanPDP-150-02 The Power of Physical Activity andSportPDP-150-03 Human Behavior in a Computational AgePDP-150-04 Strange IdeasPDP-150-05 After the ScourgePDP-150-06 Swimming in a sea of misinformationPDP-150-07 A Mans Man and a Womans WomanPDP-150-08 Creativity in the Arts SciencesBusiness Sports... in LifePDP-150-09 How to Rock the BoatPDP-150-10 Superhero NarrativesPDP-150-11 Dog is My Co-PilotPDP-150-12 Leadership and the Art of DecisionPDP-150-13 Free PlayPDP-150-14 Knowledge The Only FrontierPDP-150-15 Music Sweet Music PDP-150-16 The Fine Line between Glory & GuiltPDP-150-17 The Souls of Black Folk CriticalReadings By and About African Americans in the20th and 21st CenturiesPDP-150-18 Whos Sorry Now Thinking ThroughApologies Made on the Public StagePDP-150-19 Chickens Chickens ChickensPDP-150-20 The Narnian The Life and Imaginationof C.S. LewisPDP-150-21 Liberal Arts of the Living DeadPDP-150-22 Liberal Arts of the Living DeadPDP-150-23 Human Behavior in a Computational AgePDP-150-24 Latino USAPDP-150-25 Tweet Friend Pin Social Media &You as a 21st Century CitizenPDP-150-26 The Power of Physical Activity andSportPDP-150-29 Free PlayPDP-150-30 Media Narratives Spinning the Truth

Unit(s): 3
or
An introduction to the academic community ofBridgewater College to the liberal arts and tothe skills of critical thinking and reflectivewriting specifically designed for transferstudents. Transfer students will explore theunique challenges of integrating into a liberalarts educational environment and will begin theprocess of documenting their experiences andgrowth in the four dimensions of personaldevelopment intellectual growth and discoverycitizenship and community responsibility ethicaland spiritual growth and emotional maturationandphysical health.general education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
Introduction to academic expository andargumentative writing with a focus on developingrhetorical skills and practices appropriate to arange of disciplines. Instruction in ethical useof material from sources and academicdocumentation systems. Supplementary writersworkshop required based on placement.General Education 2014 master core skill

Unit(s): 3
BIOL-110 and BIOL-111
A precalculus course for students continuing inmathematics. Includes topics in algebrafunctionsand relations and trigonometry.Prerequisites MATH 110 or satisfactoryperformance on placement test

Unit(s): 3
FILA general education writing intensive

Unit(s): 4

Introduction to the physiology of the human bodyincluding the physiology of enzymes andmembranes tissue physiology (nervous muscular)and a detailed survey of the physiology of themajor organ systems. Three lectures and one labper week.Prerequisites BIOL 111 or BIOL 110 and 305Credit may not be received for both BIOL 311 and314

Unit(s): 4

The molecular basis of cell structure andfunction. Topics include the chemistryarchitecture and analysis of macromoleculesoverview of thermodynamics and metabolismenzymology genetic processes and controlsrecombinant DNA technology and cell signalingmechanisms. Three lectures and one lab perweek.Prerequisites BIOL 111 and CHEM 161 orpermission of instructorCredit may not be received for both BIOL-216 andBIOL-325

Unit(s): 4

Ecology (1 course)

Analysis of the distribution and abundance oforganisms population growth and regulation andspecies interactions as well as community andecosystem processes. Three lectures and onelab per week.Prerequisites BIOL 111 and MATH 1302016 Summer Session I Begins 5-23-16

Unit(s): 4

Organismal Biology (1 course)

Explores the anatomy physiology ecology andbehaviors that have produced an extraordinarybiodiversity of bird species. The major groups ofmodern birds are introduced and their originand ecology are examined. Students learnto recognize local species in the field andexamine them in the lab using the ornithologycollections. Suitable for bothbiology majors and non-majors.Prerequisites BIOL 100 or 110Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

An introduction to the study of amphibians andreptiles. Lectures will focus on the origin andevolution of amphibians and reptiles and ontheir biology ecology and conservation. Lab willemphasize taxonomy anatomy speciesidentification and common field techniques usedto study these groups.Prerequisite BIOL 111Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

A comprehensive survey of mammals. Lectures willfocus on phylogenetics the origin and evolutionof mammals and their biology ecology andconservation. Lab will emphasize taxonomyspecies identification and common fieldtechniques used to study mammals.Prerequisite BIOL 111Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

A comprehensive survey of the plant kingdom thatwill include topics ranging from plant anatomyphysiology diversity and ecology. Studentsinterested in ecology forestry and wildlifebiology will find this course particularlyuseful. Three lectures and one lab per week.Prerequisite BIOL 111Alternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 4

Introductory survey of microbiology with anemphasis on bacteriology. The lecture componentcovers the structure nutrition metabolism andgenetics of microbes medical microbiologydiagnostic techniques microbial ecology andindustrial microbiology. The lab componentincludes biological safety microscopy culturetechniques media staining identification ofunknown bacteria and an independent researchproject. Two lectures and two labs perweek.Prerequisites BIOL 309 or permission ofinstructor BIOL 325 recommended

Unit(s): 4

Exploration of major human pathogens includingviruses bacteria fungi protozoa andhelminths.Topics include host-parasite interactions hostdefenses pathogenic mechanisms control ofmicroorganisms diagnosis and identification ofinfectious agents antibiotic therapy diseasetransmission and epidemiology. Class activitiesinclude discussion of medical case studiesliterature analysis identification of unknownsand field trips. Three lectures and onelab per week.Prerequisite BIOL-309 or permission ofinstructor BIOL-325 and BIOL-400 stronglyrecommended)

Unit(s): 4

Broad survey of the diversity andclassification of vascular plants. Students willlearn to recognize common and important plantfamilies as well as learn to identify local taxa.Traditional and modern methods of taxonomy andsystematics are presented.Prerequisite BIOL 111 BIOL 430 recommendedAlternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 4

BIOL/
A survey of diversity of fish (with an emphasison freshwater fish of North America). Topics willinclude taxonomy anatomy physiology behaviorand ecology. There will be special emphasis onmanagement of fish populations and diversityin the face of environmental threats includingpollution habitat alteration overharvest andinvasive species. Lab will include basic ecologyand behavior but will focus heavily on commonfisheries techniques.Prerequisite ENVRBIOL 301 or BIOL 350 orpermission of the instructorAlternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 4

Introduction to the theoreticalframework and the methodology of animal behaviorresearch. Students examine the causationdevelopment current function and evolutionaryhistory of behavior of invertebrates andvertebrates. Integrates concepts and principlesfrom multipledisciplines to understand behaviors such asforaging and predation mating systemscommunication parental care social hierarchiesand territoriality. Students also review thehistory of the field of animal behavior and thecontributions that animal behavior research canmake to applied disciplines such as environmentalconservation biomedical research and humanpsychology.Prerequisites Any one of the following BIOL311 314 or 350 PSY 210 or permission of theinstructorAlternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

Ecology and Organismal Biology (1 course)

Explores the anatomy physiology ecology andbehaviors that have produced an extraordinarybiodiversity of bird species. The major groups ofmodern birds are introduced and their originand ecology are examined. Students learnto recognize local species in the field andexamine them in the lab using the ornithologycollections. Suitable for bothbiology majors and non-majors.Prerequisites BIOL 100 or 110Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

Introduction to developmental biology witha focus on its fundamental aspectsembryogenesis growth cellular differentiationand morphogenesis. The study of theory issupplemented with hands-on observations of earlydevelopment in animal embryos (salamander andormouse or other animals). We also considerthe impact of recent advances in developmentalbiology on our society by exploring the ethicalmoral and religious implications as well as thelegal issues that inevitably arise from work inthis field.Prerequisites BIOL 111 and one additionalBIOL course numbered 200 or aboveAlternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 3

An introduction to the study of amphibians andreptiles. Lectures will focus on the origin andevolution of amphibians and reptiles and ontheir biology ecology and conservation. Lab willemphasize taxonomy anatomy speciesidentification and common field techniques usedto study these groups.Prerequisite BIOL 111Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

A comprehensive survey of mammals. Lectures willfocus on phylogenetics the origin and evolutionof mammals and their biology ecology andconservation. Lab will emphasize taxonomyspecies identification and common fieldtechniques used to study mammals.Prerequisite BIOL 111Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

A comprehensive survey of the plant kingdom thatwill include topics ranging from plant anatomyphysiology diversity and ecology. Studentsinterested in ecology forestry and wildlifebiology will find this course particularlyuseful. Three lectures and one lab per week.Prerequisite BIOL 111Alternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 4

Introductory survey of microbiology with anemphasis on bacteriology. The lecture componentcovers the structure nutrition metabolism andgenetics of microbes medical microbiologydiagnostic techniques microbial ecology andindustrial microbiology. The lab componentincludes biological safety microscopy culturetechniques media staining identification ofunknown bacteria and an independent researchproject. Two lectures and two labs perweek.Prerequisites BIOL 309 or permission ofinstructor BIOL 325 recommended

Unit(s): 4

BIOL/
An exploration of how microorganisms interactwiththeir environment and the implications of theseinteractions for humans. Specific topics willinclude antibiotic resistance biodegradationbiodiversity biofuels bioremediation extremeenvironments geochemical cycles methods forsampling culture and analysis of environmentalmicroorganisms microbiology of air water andsoil environmental pathogens andmicrobiologicaltreatment of sewage and water. Three lectures andone lab per week.Prerequisites BIOL 309 or ENVRCHEM 320Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

Exploration of major human pathogens includingviruses bacteria fungi protozoa andhelminths.Topics include host-parasite interactions hostdefenses pathogenic mechanisms control ofmicroorganisms diagnosis and identification ofinfectious agents antibiotic therapy diseasetransmission and epidemiology. Class activitiesinclude discussion of medical case studiesliterature analysis identification of unknownsand field trips. Three lectures and onelab per week.Prerequisite BIOL-309 or permission ofinstructor BIOL-325 and BIOL-400 stronglyrecommended)

Unit(s): 4

Broad survey of the diversity andclassification of vascular plants. Students willlearn to recognize common and important plantfamilies as well as learn to identify local taxa.Traditional and modern methods of taxonomy andsystematics are presented.Prerequisite BIOL 111 BIOL 430 recommendedAlternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 4

BIOL/
A survey of diversity of fish (with an emphasison freshwater fish of North America). Topics willinclude taxonomy anatomy physiology behaviorand ecology. There will be special emphasis onmanagement of fish populations and diversityin the face of environmental threats includingpollution habitat alteration overharvest andinvasive species. Lab will include basic ecologyand behavior but will focus heavily on commonfisheries techniques.Prerequisite ENVRBIOL 301 or BIOL 350 orpermission of the instructorAlternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 4

BIOL/
An introduction to aquatic ecosystems (lakesponds streams and wetlands). Students will learnabout the major chemical and physical processesthat determine the function of freshwatersystems. Students will be introduced to the majorgroups of aquatic organisms (algae vascularplants invertebrates and fish). Includes strongemphasis on the impacts that humans have onfreshwater systems. The lab will introduce thebasic skills necessary for the study andmanagement of fresh waters.Prerequisite ENVRBIOL 301 or BIOL 350 orpermission of the instructorAlternate years offered 2015-2016

Unit(s): 4

Introduction to the theoreticalframework and the methodology of animal behaviorresearch. Students examine the causationdevelopment current function and evolutionaryhistory of behavior of invertebrates andvertebrates. Integrates concepts and principlesfrom multipledisciplines to understand behaviors such asforaging and predation mating systemscommunication parental care social hierarchiesand territoriality. Students also review thehistory of the field of animal behavior and thecontributions that animal behavior research canmake to applied disciplines such as environmentalconservation biomedical research and humanpsychology.Prerequisites Any one of the following BIOL311 314 or 350 PSY 210 or permission of theinstructorAlternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

And 1 Environmental Science course numbered 300 or higher, listed as BIOL/ENVR (3-4 credits)

For the elective BIOL or ENVR courses in the tracks, only 3 credits may be chosen from BIOL or ENVR 460, 490, 491 or 499, and Internship (BIOL or ENVR 480) cannot be used to meet this requirement.

Environmental Chemistry Emphasis

The environmental chemistry emphasis allows students majoring in environmental science or biology to pursue additional depth of preparation in a unique combination of courses. Students learn chemical techniques, analytics, sampling methods and instrumentation which are relevant to the understanding of environmental issues. Learning to find trace atmospheric, soil and water-borne constituents of either human or natural origin are critical to identifying potential pollutants in water, soil and the organic tissues of living organisms. This emphasis gives students distinctive training in chemical analysis of the environment.

Structure nomenclature reaction mechanismssynthesis and identification of organicmolecules. Three hours of lecture and onefour-hour lab per week.Prerequisite CHEM 162 or permissionof the instructorCredit cannot be earned for both CHEM250 and 305

Unit(s): 4

-and-
Structure nomenclature reaction mechanismssynthesis and identification of organicmolecules. Three hours of lecture and onefour-hour lab per week.Prerequisite CHEM 305

Unit(s): 4

-or-
A continuation of organic chemistry startedin CHEM 305 including a study of theinterpretation of infrared spectroscopy protonand carbon NMR UV-visible spectroscopy and massspectrometry. The lab will be an introduction tochemical research that includes research methodsand techniques through a series of experiments.Prerequisite CHEM 305Credit may not be received for both 306 and310 or for both CHEM-308 and CHEM-310

Unit(s): 5


ENVR/
The chemistry and quantitative aspects ofenvironmentally important cycles (C N O P S)in the context of the atmosphere hydrosphere andlithosphere. Major environmental issues arediscussed such as acid rain sewage treatmentozone destruction anthropogenic climate changeair pollution and eutrophication. Laboratoriesinvolve sampling quantitative detection and dataanalysis. Three hours of lecture and onefour-hour lab per week. Prerequisites CHEM-162

Unit(s): 4

This course is a study of the environment on theEarths surface the boundary between the solidand liquid and interactions between rock andwater. This will include weathering and theformation of soil and the flow of water at thesurface and below ground level. Lab activitieswill include sampling and analysis of soilsurface water and groundwater.Prerequisites ENVR-301

Unit(s): 3


Choose two:

Exposure to methods of quantitation signalto-noise enhancement instrumental design andfunction methods of spectroscopychromatographyelectroanalytical analysis and massspectrometry. Three hours of lecture and onefour-hour lab per week.Prerequisite CHEM 250 or 305Alternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 4

ENVR/
This course will provide a framework for studyinghow animals function in their native environmentsat different stages of their life cycles. Itsscope is animal physiology blended withenvironmental science principles ofphysiological mechanisms are examined from theperspective of physiological adaptation in agiven environmental context including specificadaptations to environmental extremes. Coursestructure active learning lectures and appliedlearning labs. Development of critical scientificthinking and scientific writing are significantcomponents of the course.Prerequisites
Taught in the style of a seminar a small groupof students learn thinking skills throughdiscussion debate peer review andbrainstorming. Context varies from section tosection. Incoming students rank topic preferencesand then are assigned to a section. Focusesspecifically on two key areas of personaldevelopment (1) intellectual growth isstimulated through systematic criticalquestioning and (2) a sense of communityinvolvement and responsibility is developedthrough classroom group work collaborativelearning and a class community engagementproject. The course also contains success skillexercises and college orientation informationincluding an introduction to the portfolioprogram.General education master core skills2017 Fall Semester TopicsPDP-150-01 A Mans Man and a Womans WomanPDP-150-02 The Power of Physical Activity andSportPDP-150-03 Human Behavior in a Computational AgePDP-150-04 Strange IdeasPDP-150-05 After the ScourgePDP-150-06 Swimming in a sea of misinformationPDP-150-07 A Mans Man and a Womans WomanPDP-150-08 Creativity in the Arts SciencesBusiness Sports... in LifePDP-150-09 How to Rock the BoatPDP-150-10 Superhero NarrativesPDP-150-11 Dog is My Co-PilotPDP-150-12 Leadership and the Art of DecisionPDP-150-13 Free PlayPDP-150-14 Knowledge The Only FrontierPDP-150-15 Music Sweet Music PDP-150-16 The Fine Line between Glory & GuiltPDP-150-17 The Souls of Black Folk CriticalReadings By and About African Americans in the20th and 21st CenturiesPDP-150-18 Whos Sorry Now Thinking ThroughApologies Made on the Public StagePDP-150-19 Chickens Chickens ChickensPDP-150-20 The Narnian The Life and Imaginationof C.S. LewisPDP-150-21 Liberal Arts of the Living DeadPDP-150-22 Liberal Arts of the Living DeadPDP-150-23 Human Behavior in a Computational AgePDP-150-24 Latino USAPDP-150-25 Tweet Friend Pin Social Media &You as a 21st Century CitizenPDP-150-26 The Power of Physical Activity andSportPDP-150-29 Free PlayPDP-150-30 Media Narratives Spinning the Truth

Unit(s): 3
or
An introduction to the academic community ofBridgewater College to the liberal arts and tothe skills of critical thinking and reflectivewriting specifically designed for transferstudents. Transfer students will explore theunique challenges of integrating into a liberalarts educational environment and will begin theprocess of documenting their experiences andgrowth in the four dimensions of personaldevelopment intellectual growth and discoverycitizenship and community responsibility ethicaland spiritual growth and emotional maturationandphysical health.general education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
Introduction to academic expository andargumentative writing with a focus on developingrhetorical skills and practices appropriate to arange of disciplines. Instruction in ethical useof material from sources and academicdocumentation systems. Supplementary writersworkshop required based on placement.General Education 2014 master core skill

Unit(s): 3
BIOL-110 and BIOL-111 and
A precalculus course for students continuing inmathematics. Includes topics in algebrafunctionsand relations and trigonometry.Prerequisites MATH 110 or satisfactoryperformance on placement test

Unit(s): 3
FILA general education writing intensive

Unit(s): 4

An exploration of how microorganisms interactwiththeir environment and the implications of theseinteractions for humans. Specific topics willinclude antibiotic resistance biodegradationbiodiversity biofuels bioremediation extremeenvironments geochemical cycles methods forsampling culture and analysis of environmentalmicroorganisms microbiology of air water andsoil environmental pathogens andmicrobiologicaltreatment of sewage and water. Three lectures andone lab per week.Prerequisites BIOL 309 or ENVRCHEM 320Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

Freshwater Resources Emphasis

The freshwater resources emphasis allows students majoring in environmental science or biology to focus on availability, ecology and protection of water resources. While water is a basic resource for all life, many human activities degrade water quality requiring specialists who are able to help maintain water quality. This emphasis allows students to delve into the issues of water quality from a biological, chemical and geological perspective.

The chemistry and quantitative aspects ofenvironmentally important cycles (C N O P S)in the context of the atmosphere hydrosphere andlithosphere. Major environmental issues arediscussed such as acid rain sewage treatmentozone destruction anthropogenic climate changeair pollution and eutrophication. Laboratoriesinvolve sampling quantitative detection and dataanalysis. Three hours of lecture and onefour-hour lab per week. Prerequisites CHEM-162

Unit(s): 4

ENVR/
Introduction to aquatic ecosystems (lakesponds streams and wetlands). Students learnabout the major chemical and physical processesthat determine the function of freshwatersystems. Students are introduced to the majorgroups of aquatic organisms (algae vascularplants invertebrates fish and amphibians).Strongemphasis on the impacts that humans have onfreshwater systems. The lab introduces thebasic skills necessary for the study andmanagement of fresh waters.Prerequisites BIOLENVR 301 or BIOL 350 orpermission of instructorAlternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4


Choose three:

ENVR/
Survey of diversity of fish (with an emphasison freshwater fish of North America). Topicsinclude taxonomy anatomy physiology behaviorand ecology. Special emphasis onmanagement of fish populations and diversityin the face of environmental threats includingpollution habitat alteration overharvest andinvasive species. Lab includes basic ecologyand behavior but focuses heavily on commonfisheries techniques.Prerequisites BIOLENVR 301 or BIOL 350 orpermission of instructorAlternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 4

ENVR/
Exploration of how microorganisms interact withtheir environment and the implications of theseinteractions for humans. Specific topicsinclude antibiotic resistance biodegradationbiodiversity biofuels bioremediation extremeenvironments geochemical cycles methods forsampling culture and analysis of environmentalmicroorganisms microbiology of air water andsoil environmental pathogens andmicrobiologicaltreatment of sewage and water. Three lectures andone lab per week.Prerequisites BIOL 309 or ENVRCHEM 320Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

ENVR/
In this course students will learn aboutstormwater management practices and theireffectiveness as well as regulatory efforts. Inaddition rural and agricultural practices thatimpact water quality will be addressed.Presentations and field assignments will be partof the course so students see how local workaffects watershed quality. Students will learnmanagement techniques specific to urban and ruralenvironments as well as the economic politicaland sociological implications of these solutions.Prerequisites
Introduces basic biological conceptsand applies them to help students understand thecauses and solutions of environmental problems.Addresses a wide variety of environmental issuesincluding biodiversity loss the effects ofpollution on organisms and ecosystems and globalclimate change. Special emphasis given to helpstudents understand how scientific knowledge isdeveloped and scientific information can befound interpreted and applied by society. Threelectures and one laboratory per week.Corequisite MATH 118 or MATH 110FILA general education natural and physicalsciences

Unit(s): 4
or BIOL-111

Unit(s): 3

This course is an introduction to GeographicInformation Systems (GIS). GIS is a computerizedsystem that allows users to collect storevisualize and analyze locationalgeospatial data.Students learn basic cartographic concepts andthe use of common GIS software programs. Thecourse focuses on environmental and biologicalapplications of GIS while the technology also hasmany applications in earth sciences urbanplanning business etc.Prerequisites
A precalculus course for students continuing inmathematics. Includes topics in algebrafunctionsand relations and trigonometry.Prerequisites MATH 110 or satisfactoryperformance on placement test

Unit(s): 3


Unit(s): 4

This course is a study of the environment on theEarths surface the boundary between the solidand liquid and interactions between rock andwater. This will include weathering and theformation of soil and the flow of water at thesurface and below ground level. Lab activitieswill include sampling and analysis of soilsurface water and groundwater.Prerequisites ENVR-301

Unit(s): 3

Wildlife Biology Emphasis

The Wildlife Biology emphasis allows students wanting the breadth of the biology or environmental science major to also focus in areas of wildlife biology and management. In this program, students will take 11–17 additional credits on top of their major to specialize in wildlife. The program offers directed study in wildlife management and techniques, botany, zoology, and policy and ethics. This program along with the biology or environmental science major and the general education requirements will support students wishing to pursue careers with state and federal agencies, graduate degree programs in wildlife biology, as well as those who wish to pursue Wildlife Biologist Certification through the Wildlife Society.

Consists of 23 credits. The requirements are as follows:

Wildlife Management and Techniques
Take one course:
BIOL/

Explores the ecology and management of wildlifewith an emphasis on North American mammals andbirds. Topics include habitat quality forestrynutrition disease population dynamics anddiversity. Also explores human dimensions in theNorth American stakeholder model of wildlifemanagement. Lab emphasizes field techniques.Three lectures and one lab per week.Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 ENG 110 andBIOL 111 or permission of instructorAlternate years offered 2016-2017Writing Intensive

Unit(s): 4

BIOL/
This primarily field-based course will provide abroad overview of techniques and conceptsinvolvedin field biology (especially ecology) includingbasic scientific method and a variety of samplingtechniques. Course content also has a strongemphasis on basic natural history as studentslearn about and experience a wide variety oforganisms (e.g. plant fungi insects fishamphibians and mammals) ecosystems (e.g.forests grasslands wetlands ponds andstreams)and ecological interactions. Students will alsodiscuss techniques for interpretingteachingthesebiological concepts to others.Prerequisites BIOL 111 or permission ofinstructor2017 Summer Session I Begins 5-30-17 HybridOnline Course Meets on Campus

Unit(s): 4

BIOL/
Survey of the methods used bythe public and private sectors to manage ourenvironment and natural resources. The primaryemphasis will be on restoration ecology andconservation biology. Other topics that will beaddressed will include environmental engineering(e.g. green chemistry and design of pollutioncontrol devices) economic considerations inconservation (e.g. conservation land easementsand ecotourism) and government regulation. Thelab will provide students with experienceapplyingstandard methods of monitoring biologicalresources. The lab will also provide anopportunity for students to hear talks fromenvironmental experts and to travel to localsites where management activities are occurring.Prerequisite BIOL 111 or permission of theinstructorAlternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 4

Molecules, Anatomy and Physiology
Take one course:

Introduction to both classical Mendelianinheritance and molecular genetics with one labper week.Prerequisites BIOL 111 or permission ofinstructor CHEM 161 recommendedBIOL-216 may not be substituted for BIOL-309

Unit(s): 4

Introduction to animal physiology - how animalsfunction at cellular systems and organismallevels. Knowledge that is acquired in this courseserves as an excellent foundation for futurepostgraduate or professional studies in animalhealth & management. Course structure activelearning lectures and applied learning labs.Development of scientific thinking and writingare significant components of the course.Prerequisites
Taught in the style of a seminar a small groupof students learn thinking skills throughdiscussion debate peer review andbrainstorming. Context varies from section tosection. Incoming students rank topic preferencesand then are assigned to a section. Focusesspecifically on two key areas of personaldevelopment (1) intellectual growth isstimulated through systematic criticalquestioning and (2) a sense of communityinvolvement and responsibility is developedthrough classroom group work collaborativelearning and a class community engagementproject. The course also contains success skillexercises and college orientation informationincluding an introduction to the portfolioprogram.General education master core skills2017 Fall Semester TopicsPDP-150-01 A Mans Man and a Womans WomanPDP-150-02 The Power of Physical Activity andSportPDP-150-03 Human Behavior in a Computational AgePDP-150-04 Strange IdeasPDP-150-05 After the ScourgePDP-150-06 Swimming in a sea of misinformationPDP-150-07 A Mans Man and a Womans WomanPDP-150-08 Creativity in the Arts SciencesBusiness Sports... in LifePDP-150-09 How to Rock the BoatPDP-150-10 Superhero NarrativesPDP-150-11 Dog is My Co-PilotPDP-150-12 Leadership and the Art of DecisionPDP-150-13 Free PlayPDP-150-14 Knowledge The Only FrontierPDP-150-15 Music Sweet Music PDP-150-16 The Fine Line between Glory & GuiltPDP-150-17 The Souls of Black Folk CriticalReadings By and About African Americans in the20th and 21st CenturiesPDP-150-18 Whos Sorry Now Thinking ThroughApologies Made on the Public StagePDP-150-19 Chickens Chickens ChickensPDP-150-20 The Narnian The Life and Imaginationof C.S. LewisPDP-150-21 Liberal Arts of the Living DeadPDP-150-22 Liberal Arts of the Living DeadPDP-150-23 Human Behavior in a Computational AgePDP-150-24 Latino USAPDP-150-25 Tweet Friend Pin Social Media &You as a 21st Century CitizenPDP-150-26 The Power of Physical Activity andSportPDP-150-29 Free PlayPDP-150-30 Media Narratives Spinning the Truth

Unit(s): 3
or
An introduction to the academic community ofBridgewater College to the liberal arts and tothe skills of critical thinking and reflectivewriting specifically designed for transferstudents. Transfer students will explore theunique challenges of integrating into a liberalarts educational environment and will begin theprocess of documenting their experiences andgrowth in the four dimensions of personaldevelopment intellectual growth and discoverycitizenship and community responsibility ethicaland spiritual growth and emotional maturationandphysical health.general education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
Introduction to academic expository andargumentative writing with a focus on developingrhetorical skills and practices appropriate to arange of disciplines. Instruction in ethical useof material from sources and academicdocumentation systems. Supplementary writersworkshop required based on placement.General Education 2014 master core skill

Unit(s): 3
BIOL-110 and BIOL-111
A precalculus course for students continuing inmathematics. Includes topics in algebrafunctionsand relations and trigonometry.Prerequisites MATH 110 or satisfactoryperformance on placement test

Unit(s): 3
FILA general education writing intensive

Unit(s): 4

The molecular basis of cell structure andfunction. Topics include the chemistryarchitecture and analysis of macromoleculesoverview of thermodynamics and metabolismenzymology genetic processes and controlsrecombinant DNA technology and cell signalingmechanisms. Three lectures and one lab perweek.Prerequisites BIOL 111 and CHEM 161 orpermission of instructorCredit may not be received for both BIOL-216 andBIOL-325

Unit(s): 4

BIOL/
This course will provide a framework for studyinghow animals function in their native environmentsat different stages of their life cycles. Itsscope is animal physiology blended withenvironmental science principles ofphysiological mechanisms are examined from theperspective of physiological adaptation in agiven environmental context including specificadaptations to environmental extremes. Coursestructure active learning lectures and appliedlearning labs. Development of critical scientificthinking and scientific writing are significantcomponents of the course.Prerequisites
Taught in the style of a seminar a small groupof students learn thinking skills throughdiscussion debate peer review andbrainstorming. Context varies from section tosection. Incoming students rank topic preferencesand then are assigned to a section. Focusesspecifically on two key areas of personaldevelopment (1) intellectual growth isstimulated through systematic criticalquestioning and (2) a sense of communityinvolvement and responsibility is developedthrough classroom group work collaborativelearning and a class community engagementproject. The course also contains success skillexercises and college orientation informationincluding an introduction to the portfolioprogram.General education master core skills2017 Fall Semester TopicsPDP-150-01 A Mans Man and a Womans WomanPDP-150-02 The Power of Physical Activity andSportPDP-150-03 Human Behavior in a Computational AgePDP-150-04 Strange IdeasPDP-150-05 After the ScourgePDP-150-06 Swimming in a sea of misinformationPDP-150-07 A Mans Man and a Womans WomanPDP-150-08 Creativity in the Arts SciencesBusiness Sports... in LifePDP-150-09 How to Rock the BoatPDP-150-10 Superhero NarrativesPDP-150-11 Dog is My Co-PilotPDP-150-12 Leadership and the Art of DecisionPDP-150-13 Free PlayPDP-150-14 Knowledge The Only FrontierPDP-150-15 Music Sweet Music PDP-150-16 The Fine Line between Glory & GuiltPDP-150-17 The Souls of Black Folk CriticalReadings By and About African Americans in the20th and 21st CenturiesPDP-150-18 Whos Sorry Now Thinking ThroughApologies Made on the Public StagePDP-150-19 Chickens Chickens ChickensPDP-150-20 The Narnian The Life and Imaginationof C.S. LewisPDP-150-21 Liberal Arts of the Living DeadPDP-150-22 Liberal Arts of the Living DeadPDP-150-23 Human Behavior in a Computational AgePDP-150-24 Latino USAPDP-150-25 Tweet Friend Pin Social Media &You as a 21st Century CitizenPDP-150-26 The Power of Physical Activity andSportPDP-150-29 Free PlayPDP-150-30 Media Narratives Spinning the Truth

Unit(s): 3
or
An introduction to the academic community ofBridgewater College to the liberal arts and tothe skills of critical thinking and reflectivewriting specifically designed for transferstudents. Transfer students will explore theunique challenges of integrating into a liberalarts educational environment and will begin theprocess of documenting their experiences andgrowth in the four dimensions of personaldevelopment intellectual growth and discoverycitizenship and community responsibility ethicaland spiritual growth and emotional maturationandphysical health.general education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
ENG-110BIOL-110 and BIOL-111 and
A precalculus course for students continuing inmathematics. Includes topics in algebrafunctionsand relations and trigonometry.Prerequisites MATH 110 or satisfactoryperformance on placement test

Unit(s): 3
FILA general education writing intensive

Unit(s): 4

Comparative study of the major organ systems invertebrate animals. Lectures examine topics suchas the origin and adaptive evolution ofvertebrate anatomy and the systematicrelationships between vertebrate groups. The labprovides a detailed examination of vertebrateanatomy. Three lectures and one lab per week.Prerequisite BIOL 111Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

Botany
Take one course:

Survey of the vascular flora of the ShenandoahValley and surrounding mountain areas.Field-based course that introduces students tothe identification of plants in the field oftheirecology. Plant collection and specimenpreservation are also included.Prerequisites BIOL 1112017 Summer Session I Begins 5-30-17 CANCELED

Unit(s): 4

A comprehensive survey of the plant kingdom thatwill include topics ranging from plant anatomyphysiology diversity and ecology. Studentsinterested in ecology forestry and wildlifebiology will find this course particularlyuseful. Three lectures and one lab per week.Prerequisite BIOL 111Alternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 4

Broad survey of the diversity andclassification of vascular plants. Students willlearn to recognize common and important plantfamilies as well as learn to identify local taxa.Traditional and modern methods of taxonomy andsystematics are presented.Prerequisite BIOL 111 BIOL 430 recommendedAlternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 4

Zoology/Organisms
Take two courses:

Explores the anatomy physiology ecology andbehaviors that have produced an extraordinarybiodiversity of bird species. The major groups ofmodern birds are introduced and their originand ecology are examined. Students learnto recognize local species in the field andexamine them in the lab using the ornithologycollections. Suitable for bothbiology majors and non-majors.Prerequisites BIOL 100 or 110Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

An introduction to the study of amphibians andreptiles. Lectures will focus on the origin andevolution of amphibians and reptiles and ontheir biology ecology and conservation. Lab willemphasize taxonomy anatomy speciesidentification and common field techniques usedto study these groups.Prerequisite BIOL 111Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

A comprehensive survey of mammals. Lectures willfocus on phylogenetics the origin and evolutionof mammals and their biology ecology andconservation. Lab will emphasize taxonomyspecies identification and common fieldtechniques used to study mammals.Prerequisite BIOL 111Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

BIOL/
A survey of diversity of fish (with an emphasison freshwater fish of North America). Topics willinclude taxonomy anatomy physiology behaviorand ecology. There will be special emphasis onmanagement of fish populations and diversityin the face of environmental threats includingpollution habitat alteration overharvest andinvasive species. Lab will include basic ecologyand behavior but will focus heavily on commonfisheries techniques.Prerequisite ENVRBIOL 301 or BIOL 350 orpermission of the instructorAlternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 4

Introduction to the theoreticalframework and the methodology of animal behaviorresearch. Students examine the causationdevelopment current function and evolutionaryhistory of behavior of invertebrates andvertebrates. Integrates concepts and principlesfrom multipledisciplines to understand behaviors such asforaging and predation mating systemscommunication parental care social hierarchiesand territoriality. Students also review thehistory of the field of animal behavior and thecontributions that animal behavior research canmake to applied disciplines such as environmentalconservation biomedical research and humanpsychology.Prerequisites Any one of the following BIOL311 314 or 350 PSY 210 or permission of theinstructorAlternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 4

Policy/Ethics
Take one course:

Confronts a number of modernscientific and ethical problems includingabortion genetic testing genetically modifiedplants and animals stem cells gene therapyresearch on humans and physician-assistedsuicide. Biology and biotechnology often confoundour notions of right and wrong and what ethicalbehavior is.Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 and ENG 110General Education philosophy or religion andEthical Reasoning Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 3

Pressing issues confronting professionals in atechnological era. Utilizing the insights ofphilosophical and religious ethics the courseexamines the responsibilities of the professionalperson in business medicine law education theministry and other fields. Problems consideredinclude confidentiality accountabilitywhistleblowing governmental regulation andethical codes.Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 ENG 110 andjunior or senior standingGeneral Education philosophy or religionEthical Reasoning Course

Unit(s): 3

Examines the historical development ofenvironmental ethics in the U.S. major ethicalapproaches to contemporary environmental issuesand the application of those theories toparticular topics such as ecojusticebiodiversity and global warming. Readings willbe drawn from a wide range of sources fromancient scripture to current news reports.Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 ENG 110 andone of the following courses BIOL 100 BIOL-101BIOL-110 CHEM-102 or CHEM-161General Education philosophy or religionEthical Reasoning & Writing Intensive

Unit(s): 3

This course will explore the ethical implicationsof wildlife management research and stewardshipby applying ethical frameworks to issuessurrounding wildlife. Possible topics includereintroduction of wolves to Yellowstone andsubsequent delisting predator controlsupplemental feeding loggingwildlife conflictshunting culture etc.Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 ENG 110 andBIOL 100 or 110Ethical Reasoning

Unit(s): 3

This course will provide an overview of federaland state laws that are aimed at the conservationof natural resources andor protection ofenvironmental quality. Major laws that will becovered include the National EnvironmentalProtection Act Clean Air Act Clean Water Actthe Endangered Species Act and others. Speakersfrom natural resourceenvironmental agencies suchas the Va. Department of Environmental QualityVa. Department of Game and Inland Fisheries andU.S. Forest Service will provide practicalinsights into the application and implementationof environmental policy.Prerequisites BIOL 100 101 or 110Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 3

Activities and Clubs

Pre-Med Society

As a Pre-Med Society member, you’ll have access to information and opportunities to explore a variety of medical careers. Pursue your interest in fields such as medicine, nursing, dentistry, optometry, veterinary medicine, clinical lab sciences, dental hygiene, and physical and occupational therapy.

For more information about joining the Pre-Med Society, contact:

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Beta Beta Beta (Tri-Beta) National Biological Honor Society

Network with your fellow students and faculty in the national honor society for biology.

Careers and Graduate Schools

What can you do with your biology degree?

Like our recent graduates, you might enter graduate or professional schools such as:

Biology/Biomedical Sciences –

  • Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • Auburn University
  • Clemson University
  • George Mason University
  • James Madison University
  • Ohio State University
  • Tennessee Tech
  • West Virginia University

Nursing –

  • Johns Hopkins University
  • Shenandoah University
  • Virginia Commonwealth University

Optometry –

  • Pennsylvania School of Optometry

Pharmacy –

  • Virginia Commonwealth University

Physician Assistant –

  • Jefferson College of Health Sciences

Veterinary Science –

  • Colorado State University
  • North Carolina State University
  • Ohio State University
  • Ross University
  • University of Georgia
  • University of Tennessee
  • Virginia Tech

Or pursue a career in:

  • Environmental Quality and Consulting
  • Government
  • Hospital Administration
  • Industry
  • Laboratory Research
  • Marine Biology
  • Medicine and Health
  • Pharmacy
  • Quality Assurance and Control
  • Teaching
  • Veterinary Medicine

Learn more about career paths, employment and advancement in the field of biology from the American Institute of Biological Sciences.

The Smithsonian-Mason Semester for Conservation Studies

Bridgewater College is a member institution of the Smithsonian-Mason Semester which is run by George Mason University out of the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) in Front Royal, Va. In this program, students live on the SCBI campus (a world-class conservation research facility) and learn about the theory and application of conservation biology (including the social, political and economic dimensions). Students participate in one of two 16 credit hour programs: Ecology for Effective Conservation Practices or Applied Conservation Strategies (for any student interested in conservation). Interested students should visit the program’s website (smconservation.gmu.edu/programs/undergraduate) and contact the biology department or the coordinator of international education. Both programs are appropriate for juniors and seniors. There are no specific prerequisite classes for the Applied Conservation Strategies. That program is open to all majors. The Ecology for Effective Conservation Practices semester has Ecology (BIOL-350) as a prerequisite.

Students are charged Bridgewater’s standard tuition, fees, room and meals for the consortium semester and institutional financial aid from BC is limited to $7,000 for the semester.

Visit the Department Homepage

Questions? Contact us!

Dr. Robyn Puffenbarger, Department Chair
540-828-5713
rpuffenb@bridgewater.edu