Cultural Studies Minor

Division of Humanities and Social Sciences

Consists of 18 credit hours including the following courses:

Introduction to the theory and practice of cultural studies engaging with major themes and scholarly research in the interdisciplinary field. A critical perspective on mass media and popular culture is emphasized. Topics include ideology neoliberalism recursivity patriarchy racism and celebrity fetishism. Prerequisite PDP 150 or 350

Unit(s): 3

A seminar comprised of weekly class outings to engage critically and comprehensively with public culture in all its forms deepening understanding of various cultural theories through direct exposure to a variety of public cultural events institutions and texts. Readings will be selected to correspond with these class outings and students will be expected to reflect on as well as analyze their experiences in public culture through writing assignments and semester-long projects relating to cultural change. Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 and SOC 232 General education Experiential Learning

Unit(s): 3

And four courses (at least one from each category) from the following electives:

Note: Courses for the minor must be taken in at least three different departments. No more than one May Term course will count toward the minor.

Cultural Theory

Critical study of the visual arts of the last 100 years with emphasis on understanding the implications of the concepts we know as modernism and postmodernism. Prerequisites PDP 150 or 350 ENG 110 General Education fine arts & music Writing intensive

Unit(s): 3

An introduction to the history and influence of communication technology in society. The class will explore the various social political cultural and economic impacts of new communication technology. Major topics include the origins of writing printing photography film the telegraph and telephone radio television and the internet. 2016 Summer Session II offered as an online course

Unit(s): 3

Examines how electronic media industries have changed the way we produce and consume media products. The course will examine how the digital age has impacted notions of interactivity virtual space media production networks and credibility. Particular attention will be paid to the social economic and political implications of these changes. 2015 Summer Session II offered as an online course

Unit(s): 3

An introductory methods course for the English majors and minors. Surveys a variety of rhetorical and critical theories their terminology and their application to a variety of texts in different genres. Modes of writing for diverse audiences are also practiced.

Unit(s): 3

Developments in the 20th and 21st century Western philosophy are analyzed using primary texts from both Analytic and Continental traditions. Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 and ENG 110 General Education philosophy or religion Writing Intensive Alternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 3

Analyzes philosophically the eras of the 20th century considered modernism and postmodernism. Some key ideas of relativity literary criticism modern warfare social norms and ethical values from art literature sciences social sciences and philosophy.

Unit(s): 3

Examination of the origins and development of contemporary notions of freedom democracy and equality from Nietzsche to contemporary political philosophy. Topics include liberalism libertarianism and post-modern political thought. Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 and ENG 110 General Education 2014 Philosophy or Religion Ethical Reasoning Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 3

Survey of contemporary sociological theory including the works of Erving Goffman Harold Garfinkel The Frankfurt School Bourdieu and others. Prerequisites PDP 150350 ENG 110 and SOC 301 or permission of instructor General education Writing Intensive

Unit(s): 3

Introduction to a diverse set of perspectives on culture and society using movies as a medium. Important lenses in cultural studies including critical theory postmodernism postcolonial theory feminismcritical race theory and psychoanalysis are introduced through textual examination of 21st-century films across the global landscape. This is less a film class than a survey of major contemporary theories in the humanities and social sciences. Highly recommended for students considering graduate studies in the humanities or social sciences or for anyone interested in developing a critical viewpoint on films and culture in general. Students should be prepared to view challenging films that may depict violence sexual situations substance abuse andor strong language. Prerequisite SOC 101 or permission of instructor

Unit(s): 3

THEA/
Contemporary theatrical forms of American and British drama. Begins with post-World War II dramatic works and moves sequentially to the present day. Areas of attention include the angry young men metadrama gender race and ethnicity the new brutalism and contemporary docudrama. Particular focus on how play texts engage with the cultural and historical moment of their creation. Students gain an understanding of the scope history techniques and influence of contemporary drama. Playwrights such as John Osborne Edward Albee Eduard Bond Jose Rivera Martin McDonagh Tony Kushner Sarah Kane Suzan Lori-Parks Nilo Cruz Moises Kaufman Sarah Ruhl and others are studied. Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 and ENG 110 General Education Literature & Writing Intensive Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 3

Cultural Politics

Students will develop theoretical and practical understandings of the role of sex and gender in verbal and nonverbal communication friendships families romantic relationships and professional relationships. This course also examines the issues of technology health power and violence as they related to sex and gender.

Unit(s): 3

Examines the medias role in creating and re-creating our understanding of gender race and class. Includes a historical perspective and traces how these representations have changed over time the forces that have affected representations of gender race and class and the current state of their representation in the media. A field trip to at least one museum in Washington D.C. is planned depending upon exhibits available at the time (e.g. National Museum of the American Indian Smithsonians American History Museum). 2017 Interterm Estimated Extra Cost 100

Unit(s): 3

Introduces students to the concept of folk groups and the ways they have been represented to mainstream cultures through the media of film and literature. Explores literature in conjunction with viewing of film and television depictions of the folk as well as documentary films made by folklorists. Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 and ENG 110 General Education global dynamics Alternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 3

Anthropological survey of Native North American and Meso-American cultures examining features such as traditional subsistence patterns kinship structures religious beliefs and practices social and political structures artistic expression and intellectual history. Focuses on the literary heritage of Native American cultures beginning with the oral tradition and storytelling and continuing on to the Native American Renaissance the proliferation of Native American authors and poets that began in the 1960s and continues to the present. Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 and ENG 110 General Education world cultures Alternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 3

Study of specific topics related to the French language culture and civilization. May be taken more than once provided different topics are covered. Taught in French. Prerequisites PDP-150 or PDP-350 and FREN 202 or permission of instructor

Unit(s): 3

Explores womens histories within various global contexts. It stresses the construction of gender norms and their evolution over time and encourages comparison of womens lives and experiences across various cultural contexts. Topics include womens political rights and participation womens education and literacy womens sexuality and reproduction andor womens work. Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 General education global dynamics

Unit(s): 3

Introduces ethical issues related to gender race and class. Surveys the development of identity-related critiques of traditional ethical theories and examines how the concept of the good life is related to identity. Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 and ENG 110 General Education philosophy or religion Ethical Reasoning & Writing Intensive Alternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 3

PSCI/
Interdisciplinary exploration of the power and dynamics of human similarities and differences on a global scale. Covers globalization from the perspective of identity and difference and provides opportunities to question contemporary assumptions values and patterns of behavior with the goal of making global interactions more constructive and more peaceful. Prerequisite PDP 150350 General Education Global Dynamics

Unit(s): 3

Explores the role of women in American and global politics in order to understand the role of identity institutions and social movements in democracy. Topics include womens influence on the development of the modern American welfare state feminism public policy issues of special importance to women and social movement strategies. Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 3

The nature of racial relations and inequalities in American society including their historical origins and relationship to Western capitalist development. The ethnic composition of contemporary American society impact of legal and illegal immigration patterns dynamics of modern structures and institutions the Civil Rights Movement inter-ethnic conflicts and attitudes multiculturalism and status of affirmative action are analyzed in the context of national and global social change. Prerequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350 and SOC 101 General education global dynamics

Unit(s): 3

Introduction to a variety of conceptual frameworks and theoretical lenses relating to human gender and sexualities including social constructionism political economy and cultural studies. A critical global historical and sociological approach will be emphasized to unpack gendered ad sexualized social structures like patriarchy heterosexism and hegemonic masculinity. Special attention will be paid to social movements and challenges to powerresource inequalities made by gender and sexuality-based minority groups. Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 and SOC 101 Offered alternate years 2016-2017 General Education global dynamics

Unit(s): 3

Examination of the growing ethnic diversity in the Shenandoah Valley through study of contemporary theories and research on immigration. Hands-on field experience includes first-hand interaction with local immigrants and is particularly beneficial for students seeking Spanish language intercultural andor service-learning experience. Prerequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350 and SOC 101 General Education 2014 Global Dynamics Alternate years offered 2015-2016

Unit(s): 3

Dilemmas tensions and theoretical and policy issues related to the position of Third World countries in the modern world. Questions of urbanization industrialization modernization westernization and distribution of economic resources are discussed. Various theories of development and underdevelopment are critically examined. Prerequisite PDP-150 or PDP-350 and SOC 101 General education global dynamics

Unit(s): 3

This course will examine the historical relationship between Spain and Africa as portrayed in literature film and cultural studies. We will specifically examine the Muslim conquest of Spain and the subsequent Spanish reconquest of the Iberian Peninsula and the history of the Hispano-African territories of Morocco Western Sahara and Equatorial Guinea and also the enclaves of Ceuta and Melilla and the Canary Islands. We will read about and study topics such as the AfricanMuslim heritage of Spain EuropeSpanish exploration and colonization of Africa the independence of the colonies postcolonial realities and contemporary issues such as globalization and immigration. We will also research and discuss the topics of race culture language religion and national identity. We will read fiction and nonfiction texts as well as view films and documentaries that discuss these issues. Our readings will primarily be in Spanish but may include academic or theoretical works in English. Class will be conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite PDP 150350 and SPAN 202

Unit(s): 3

Cultural Change

Studio exploration of sculptural forms that move. Projects include flip books mobiles and sculptures propelled by wind water and motors.

Unit(s): 3

Studio exploration of solving and designing and personal expression in metal fabrication using arc welding plasma cutting oxyacetylene welding and cutting cold metal work mechanical fastenings and MIG welding.

Unit(s): 3

Design and construct websites using current HTML and CSS standards and digital tools including Brackets Dreamweaver and Photoshop. Emphasis on design process content development and professional workflows.

Unit(s): 3

A studio based exploration into visual communication with typography and images using Adobe Creative Cloud applications. Emphasis is placed on the design process and creative thinking. Corequisite ENG 110 General Education fine arts and music

Unit(s): 3

A project based investigation of the materials practices and aesthetics of painting with emphasis on how these three elements work together to create compelling 2-D colored images. This course provides practical and theoretical foundations for four hundred-level courses in drawing and painting and for independent work in these media. Corequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350 General Education fine arts and music

Unit(s): 3

Learn to skillfully and confidently use digital cameras and software including Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop to create compelling photographs. Emphasis is placed on composition visual communication and creative process in a contemporary photography context. Note Students must provide a digital camera capable of manual exposure and Raw image capture. Corequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350 General Education fine arts and music

Unit(s): 3

Produce short videos using digital cameras and editing software. Emphasis is placed on developing skills in camera operation lighting audio and editing and development of effective narrative structure and non-fiction storytelling. Note Students must provide a DSLR or compact camera capable of HD video capture and external hard drive appropriate for video editing. Corequisite COMM 100 General Education fine arts and music

Unit(s): 3

COMM/
Teaches students the basic skills of researching investigating and writing in a variety of formats. Emphasis is on identification of the writing structures used by contemporary media writers and utilization of these structures in original pieces researched and written by the students. Prerequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350 and ENG 110 Writing Intensive

Unit(s): 3

COMM/
Builds on the skills-oriented approach of ENGCOMM-255W by putting behind the practice of writing. Through individual and group writing projects students work toward understanding the increasingly complex definition of news its blurring line with entertainment and the dynamic interplay between technologies and audiences. Prerequisite COMMENG 255W or permission of instructor Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 3

Students in this course will learn and apply investigative journalism and history research methodologies and techniques to produce long-form journalistic materials. This course will teach students how to identify collect analyze reproduce preserve and report on historical and difficult-to-access data and artifacts. Students will learn documentary production techniques and long-form journalism writing.

Unit(s): 3

Introduces the range of communication practices that characterize contemporary political campaigns. Students will process existing understandings of political communication theory in order to design and implement a semester-long campaign project.

Unit(s): 3

An intensive workshop providing an opportunity to gain deeper insight into literary techniques and practices through the production of original short and longer works of fiction poetry and drama as well as creative expository forms. Students will develop a single but substantial literary project unified by a common theme or themes. Group workshops and individual conferences will provide extensive feedback and critical response as the student progresses through the project. Prerequisites ENG 110

Unit(s): 3

Both a writing workshop and a reading course wherein students practice writing and analyzing poetry in consultation and comparison with practicing poets. A portion of the course includes participation in the Bridgewater International Poetry Festival a four-day event which is held in odd-numbered years. Students will manage promote host lead portions of the festival and some will read their own work. Prerequisites ENG 110 or permission of instructor

Unit(s): 3

Analysis of structure and style exercises in composition special attention to idiomatic use of language practical experience in writing poetry prose and drama in French. Prerequisite FREN 202 or permission of instructor

Unit(s): 3

The goal of this class is to improve students mastery and understanding of the Spanish language through the activity of translating texts from Spanish to English and from English to Spanish. In this class students will 1) study theoretical issues relating to the process of translating 2) analyze good and poor examples of translation 3) learn strategies for creating effective communicative translations that faithfully convey the original message 4) practice translating complex contextual and cultural documents and 5) work with a local non-profit organization to offer translating services in order to understand the practical realities involved in translating for a specific audience. Ultimately this course will help students to improve their communicative abilities in Spanish and English through critical reflection on the components of public communication and its translation. Prerequisites SPAN 202

Unit(s): 3

This course is an introduction to the many elements involved in Western theatre production with emphases on two of the primary areas of design construction and implementation scenery and costumes and an integration with stage management. The class will explore concepts techniques equipment and materials necessary for a successful theatrical production emphasizing problem solving through research experimentation and collaboration. Students will be challenged to engage and understand the interrelationships between the various elements involved in mounting a stage production and how these elements relate to and affect the other aspects of dramatic art. Previous experience with theatre is not necessary. Corequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 General education fine arts & music

Unit(s): 3

This course is a practical study of the various theories techniques and materials used in scenic painting. Focusing on theory and practice this course will encompass a systematic approach to painting theatrical scenery. Emphasis will be placed on traditional scene painting techniques including material selection (brushes and paints) and their practical application through design reproductions and faux finishes as well as the tools and paints that have been developed to support those techniques. Students will learn how the theories and techniques of scenic painting have changed historically and learn how these unique changes have impacted the material and techniques utilized by the scenic painter. This course will engage with the unique qualities of different types of paint noting how they will perform on different types of materials and how that knowledge can be used to created effective results. Projects will include painting stage drops creating stained glass windows with paint faux marble and wood grain finishes photos and designer renderings. Corequisite
Taught in the style of a seminar a small group of students learn thinking skills through discussion debate peer review and brainstorming. Context varies from section to section. Incoming students rank topic preferences and then are assigned to a section. Focuses specifically on two key areas of personal development (1) intellectual growth is stimulated through systematic critical questioning and (2) a sense of community involvement and responsibility is developed through classroom group work collaborative learning and a class community engagement project. The course also contains success skill exercises and college orientation information including an introduction to the portfolio program. General education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
or
An introduction to the academic community of Bridgewater College to the liberal arts and to the skills of critical thinking and reflective writing specifically designed for transfer students. Transfer students will explore the unique challenges of integrating into a liberal arts educational environment and will begin the process of documenting their experiences and growth in the four dimensions of personal development intellectual growth and discovery citizenship and community responsibility ethical and spiritual growth and emotional maturation and physical health. general education 2014 master core skills

Unit(s): 3
FILA general education fine arts & music (effective 2016-17)

Unit(s): 3

The production laboratory requires intense involvement with the process of translating a play text from script to performance. It will require students to work independently and as an ensemble interpreting rehearsing and performing a play. Those enrolled will be expected to rehearse five to six nights per week for eight weeks exhibiting a commitment to their peers and the production. Each student will be required to keep a journal of their process of character creation as well as submit a significant final paper that analyzes the entire production as well as their own participation. Significant in-class and out-of-class work is essential. Prerequisite By audition

Unit(s): 3

This production laboratory requires intense involvement with the process of translating a play text from script to performance. It requires students to work independently under faculty supervision interpreting and realizing theatrical design specific to their area of interest set design light design costume design property design. Students will be responsible for submitting such work as light plots ground plans rendering (lighting set costume) drawings andor sketches models and production workbooks. Furthermore students will be required to realize their ideas on stage whether through light set costume or prop construction. Students will be required to attend weekly production meetings in addition to selected rehearsals. Professionalism and dedication to theatrical production will be stressed. Each student will be required to submit a significant final paper that analyzes the entire production as well as their own participation. Significant in-class and out-of-class work is essential. Prerequisite Permission of the instructor

Unit(s): 3

This production laboratory will require intense involvement with the process of translating a play text from script to performance. It requires students to work independently under faculty supervision. Stage Management and Directing students will be required to attend rehearsals provide a detailed dramaturgical analysis of the production including production histories submit a dramaturgical note for the program organize and moderate post-performance talk backs with the cast crew and audience as well as submit a significant paper analyzing the production and their participation. Professionalism and dedication to theatrical production will be stressed. Significant in-class and out-of-class work is essential. Prerequisite Permission of the instructor

Unit(s): 3

Environmental theatre began in the 1960s in response to the social and political climate of the time. Performers and performance groups pushed the boundaries of what was traditionally thought of as theatre and as a result restructured and reinvigorated the fundamental understanding of what performance was and its function within society. Environmental theatre continues to be a powerful vehicle for social commentary. The objective of this course is three-fold to introduce the student to the cultural social and political richness of environmental theatre including site-specific performance to provide a historical understanding of the period by highlighting how the original practitioners and their works were directly influenced by cultural events of the time and to involve the student in the process of creating and performing their own individual and group site-specific environmental performance piece. Corequisite PDP 150 or PDP 350 General Education Fine arts and music

Unit(s): 3

Other elective courses, including those from study abroad programs, may be included with departmental approval.

Overlap Policy: No more than two courses in the minor (beyond any courses required for both programs) can also count toward a student's major.

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Dr. David Reznik, Assistant Professor
540-828-5349
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