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Pre-Law

Division of Humanities and Social Sciences

Planning to attend law school? Explore all the options available for you.  

  • Major in political science and choose the pre-law track.
  • Add the pre-law concentration to a different track in political science or a different major altogether.
  • Consult with the pre-law advisor, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., to select courses relevant to your area of interest.

Students from any major can attend law school. However, you should strongly consider either majoring in political science with the pre-law track or adding the pre-law concentration to a major in English, history, political science (standard or public policy tracks), or philosophy and religion. 

Pre-Law Concentration

Consists of 18 credit hours chosen from the following (a minimum of 9 credit hours must be in political science):

Explores the role of women in American and global politics in order to understand the role of identity institutions and social movements in democracy. Topics include womens influence on the development of the modern American welfare state feminism public policy issues of special importance to women and social movement strategies. Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 3

Examination of the development of US Supreme court decisions in the areas of federalism and the powers of the three branches of the federal government. Topics include judicial review the war powers of the President substantive due process government takings and the commerce clause. Alternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 3

Examination of the development of US Supreme Court decisions in the areas of civil rights and civil liberties. Topics include first amendment rights to freedom of speech press and assembly due process rights and rights to equal protection. Alternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 3

Examination of how Congress the Presidency and interest groups work together to make federal public policy. Topics include the legislative process interest group activities and the role of the presidency in the development of the federal administrative state. Students research policy-making on a topic of their choosing. Alternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 3

Explores the nature of international law and its similarities and differences with domestic law. Examines the institutions rules and organizations that provide the context for global interactions in an increasingly globalizing world. Case studies include issues such as human rights the International Criminal Court the World Trade Organization and the World Bank and International Monetary Fund. Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 and ENG 110 Writing Intensive Course Alternate years offered 2015-2016

Unit(s): 3

The internship program provides an opportunity for a student to gain field experience in an area related to the students concentration or career goals. Supervision of an intern is provided by an appropriate faculty member and by a staff member of the agency or business in which the student is an intern. A student who wishes to engage in an internship must consult with the appropriate faculty member at least eight weeks in advance of the start of the term in which the internship is to be completed. A description of the internship signed by the student and the faculty sponsor must be filed with the Director of Internships by the first day of the semester prior to the start of the internship. Approval of each application for an internship is made by the Director of Internships based upon policies and guidelines as approved by the Council on Education and the faculty. To be considered for an internship a student must have junior or senior status and at least a 2.00 grade point average. Internships are graded on an S or U basis. A student may enroll in an internship program for three credits per semester and internship credit may be earned in subsequent semesters subject to the limitations that no more than two internships may be pursued in any one agency or business and a maximum of nine credits in internships may be applied toward graduation.

Unit(s): 3

Examination of theories pertaining to the causes of crime and treatment of offenders. Theories of violent and property crimes (including white-collar crimes) are explored. Critical analysis of the social political and cultural context of the justice system in the United States of America with a special emphasis on questions of justice fairness and equality are also undertaken. Prerequisite SOC 101

Unit(s): 3

Analysis of juvenile crime and its connections to family structures peer groups and the educational system as well as gender race and class. Trends in juvenile corrections are examined along with current debates on reform. Special topics include gangs juvenile detention probation child advocates waiver to adult courts and hospitalization. Prerequisite SOC 101 Alternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 3

Investigation of the interaction between gender and social control in the United States and cross-culturally. The gendered nature of criminal activity is examined empirically and theoretically. The justice system including the correctional treatment of women is examined for its relationship to historical shifts in the status and treatment of women. Prerequisite SOC 101 Alternate years offered 2018-2019

Unit(s): 3

Comparative study of justice systems derived from major legal traditions. The development and application of these systems is examined with an emphasis on historical trends and social forces that shape them. Comparative themes include the role of political power public perceptions systems of morality constructions of guilt and corrections philosophies. Prerequisite SOC 101 Alternate years offered 2016-2017

Unit(s): 3

Analytical survey of ethical and legal issues pertaining to communication professionals focusing on the new digital media landscape. Issues explored include First Amendments rights public affairs journalism copyright defamation obscenity censorship licensing corporate and governmental communications and the Digital Millennium Act.

Unit(s): 3
E
The U.S. legal and regulatory environment including the sources of law the resolution of disputes the Uniform Commercial Code the laws of torts contracts agency partnerships corporations employment and equal opportunity and laws regulating competition. Prerequisite BUS 120 ENG 110 and junior or senior standing

Unit(s): 3

Skills of reasoning for solving problems found in ordinary language deductive and inductive formats and in common fallacies. A brief introduction to symbolic logic scientific method and probability. Prerequisite ENG 110 General Education philosophy or religion

Unit(s): 3

Pressing issues confronting professionals in a technological era. Utilizing the insights of philosophical and religious ethics the course examines the responsibilities of the professional person in business medicine law education the ministry and other fields. Problems considered include confidentiality accountability whistleblowing governmental regulation and ethical codes. Prerequisites PDP 150 or PDP 350 ENG 110 and junior or senior standing General Education philosophy or religion Ethical Reasoning Course

Unit(s): 3

This course will provide an overview of federal and state laws that are aimed at the conservation of natural resources andor protection of environmental quality. Major laws that will be covered include the National Environmental Protection Act Clean Air Act Clean Water Act the Endangered Species Act and others. Speakers from natural resourceenvironmental agencies such as the Va. Department of Environmental Quality Va. Department of Game and Inland Fisheries and U.S. Forest Service will provide practical insights into the application and implementation of environmental policy. Prerequisites BIOL 100 101 or 110 Alternate years offered 2017-2018

Unit(s): 3

Pre-Law Society

Join the Pre-Law Society to learn more about law school and legal careers. Activities include visits to law schools and courts, interviews with BC alumni who are lawyers, public forums and debates on legal issues and LSAT preparation sessions.

Law School Admission

All students applying to law schools must take the Law School Aptitude Test (LSAT) and register with the Credential Assembly Service (LSDAS).

Recent BC graduates have been admitted to law schools including the following:

  • George Mason University
  • University of Richmond
  • University of Pittsburgh
  • University of South Dakota School of Law
  • West Virginia University

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Questions? Contact Us!

Dr. Jim Josefson, Pre-Law Advisor
540-828-5322
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.